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For English Teachers: Context build approach to teaching USED TO
 
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Pictures for this grammar presentation: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By1dIh1IwzK-RWFsMDBHTlJCQWc/view?usp=sharing __________________________________________________ If you want to make a donation please use these information details: Paypal: [email protected] Sberbank: 4276 3800 2452 1630 Any help will be appreciated and will inspire me to make more videos with interesting ideas on a weekly basis. Thank you very much! Sincerely yours Empire of English.
Views: 2246 Empire of English
English Articles  -  3 Simple Rules To Fix Common Grammar Mistakes & Errors
 
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Grab the short course for $1! 👇👇👇 Stop making the 10 most common Mistakes English Learners Make! https://www.mmmenglish.com/grammar-challenge/ In this course you’ll practise what you learned in this lesson about English articles with quizzes and worksheets. PLUS, there are 9 more grammar lessons and quizzes to help you practise! This lesson will teach you three simple rules to help you to use English articles better. I KNOW this is a lesson that you need to watch because articles are one of the most complicated parts of English grammar! There are lots of rules and lots of exceptions for using English articles, so in this lesson, I've tried to explain it more clearly for you. There are three English articles - a, an and the. It is also possible to have no article. Using each of these articles changes the meaning of your sentence. Even though articles are a challenging part of speaking English, they are a really important part of English! They give information about the noun they come before. Using articles incorrectly can make your sentences confusing or sound strange! To improve your English fluency and sound more natural you need to use English articles well. To get better exam results, you need to improve the way you use articles - especially in your writing tests! I hope these three simple rules will help you to do that! Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/07/19/using-english-articles-3-simple-rules-fix-common-grammar-mistakes-errors/ mmmEnglish RECOMMENDS: Grammarly Grammar Checker can help you to use articles better - Get the Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE when you use this link: https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SHp9 Rype - Where Busy People Practice English with real English teachers: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ English Listening Practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Improve your English pronunciation and speaking skills by practicing with the mmmEnglish Imitation Technique! (SERIES 1) Storytelling: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation/ (SERIES 2) Describing people's personality and behaviour: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2 CONTACT mmmEnglish: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish Find me on Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB Find me on Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 267696 mmmEnglish
Bringing Cultural Context and Self-Identity into Education: Brian Lozenski at TEDxUMN
 
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Brian Lozenski is a doctoral student in the Culture and Teaching program at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on youth participatory action research as an educational project that positions youth as agents of societal transformation. Prior to enrolling at the University of MN, he taught secondary math for eight years in public schools in Philadelphia, PA and St. Paul, MN. Brian has combined his work as an educator dedicated to social justice with his passion for community organizing and music. Brian is currently developing a youth research partnership between the U of M and a local non-profit. ---- The individuals involved with TEDxUMN have a passion for bringing together the great thinkers at the University of Minnesota and giving them the opportunity to share their ideas worth spreading and to discuss our shared future. We provide these great people the opportunity to share these ideas on a global stage and with an incredibly diverse audience. We believe in the power of ideas to change attitudes, lives and ultimately the world. Check out TEDxUMN at http://www.TEDxUMN.com/ In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 63692 TEDx Talks
Grammar Rulz! Teach grammar in the context of social studies
 
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Story units, set in historical periods commonly studied in middle school, are divided into daily grammar exercises students correct. CD includes SMART Notebook and Mimio INK files.
Views: 4574 MaupinHouse
In The Bedroom | Basic Vocabulary Practice | ESL | EFL
 
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Hello Everyone! This video is designed for students, teachers and anyone wanting to learn English. My videos are vocabulary-based for conversation practice. Each video is themed to provide context for learning. To insure success, every video is designed with open slots for vocabulary substitution practice. These patterns allow students to practice on their own and teachers can have their class practice together as a group. These videos also work great for icebreakers and class discussions. Please have fun and speak English now! Thank you for your kind support :) Mark Kulek Here is my eBook for 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume One. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MT6OZ54 and 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume Two: For those of you who are interested in teaching English to young learners. Please have a look at my blog, Sharing My Whiteboard. http://sharingmywhiteboard.blogspot.jp Thank you for your time.
Views: 95403 Mark Kulek
Articles (a,an,the)
 
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Here I am going to tell you great facts about articles and sharing my knowledge which may help you to keep strong your Grammar basics.
Views: 164 Manoj Prajapati
Transition words in reading and writing
 
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Transition words help writers connect ideas between sentences and paragraphs. When you read, transitions help you understand not only the ideas themselves but also the relationship between them. EN ESPAÑOL Palabras de transición ayudan a escritores conectar ideas entre oraciones y párrafos. Cuando se lee, transiciones ayudan a comprender no sólo las ideas en sí mismas, sino también la relación entre ellas. EM PORTUGUÊS Palavras de transição ajudam o escritor a conectar ideias entre orações e parágrafos. Quando você lê, transições ajudam-no a compreender não só as ideias propriamente ditas, mas também a relação entre elas. FURTHER READING Transition words in reading and writing (article): http://snap.roundpath.org/index.php/articles/articles-language/56-transition-words-in-reading-and-writing Short list of transitions and transition words and expressions: https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html Exercises (with answers) by Oxford University Press: https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html REFERENCES Transitional Words and Phrases (web page) https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by Dokashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Solitude" in Artificial Music by Aryll Fae
Views: 100677 Snap Language
Teaching reading skills in a business context
 
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What do you give a business English learner to practise their reading? In Company 3.0 co-author Ed Pegg gives tips on using source material related to learners’ working lives, rather than the usual practice of relying on long articles from the business pages of a newspaper. In the workplace, our business English learners need to read emails, memos, agendas another sources of workplace texts, and Ed provides advice on ways to get the most out of teaching and using this skill and choosing the right text for the right purpose.
ESL Writers: Grammar - Articles (the, a, an)
 
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This video was recording during a live training session in August 2013 for new Writing Assistants at the College of Southern Nevada Writing Center.
Views: 108 CSN Writing Center
Grammar subject knowledge for teachers: The importance of context
 
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This video explains why we need to teach grammar or sentence level work in the context of sentences.
Views: 1115 Joy Simpson
Reading Comprehension in English
 
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Instructions on how to understand what you read in English. We call this Reading Comprehension.
Teachers form band to teach grammar
 
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Grammerheads: Local teachers put lessons on adverbs and prepositional phrases to music. View article at http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/218607
Views: 1208 LancasterOnline
011 - a/an vs. the (Rule 2) English Articles - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! كيف تتعلم إنجليزي بسهولة Ты поняла разницу между 'a' и 'the'? With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 11 - Indefinite & Definite Articles 2 A & an are indefinite articles. The is the definite article. a/an vs the: Use a/an when you are selecting one of a group and the when there is only one of something. For more great tips and videos, and to get fluent in English faster with our FREE Email Video Course, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/
Views: 60975 EnglishAnyone
When to use CAPITAL LETTERS in English
 
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Do you know when to use capital letters in titles? It seems so confusing. Some letters are capitalized and some are not. In this lesson, I focus on the extra-confusing words -- the ones that are sometimes capitalized and sometimes not! You'll learn the easy capitalization rules for writing about subjects, courses, companies, workplaces, occupations, and job titles. You'll also learn how to capitalize the names of movies, shows, books, songs, reports, articles, and more. You can do this -- watch and learn! Then take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/capital-letters-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid, and this lesson is about confusing capitals. Now, usually when you learn the rules of English capitalization, certain words are always capitalized. Okay? For example, the first word in a sentence, the word "I", the names of people and places, and so on. Okay? Some words are always capitalized, but in this lesson I'm not going to review all of the rules of capitalization, but I am going to show you about when to capitalize certain words and when not to capitalize them, because sometimes the same words are capitalized in one context, but not capitalized in another context. But it's not hard to understand; it's actually very easy. Okay? So I'm going to explain it to you right now. Let's get started. So, the first one is in the area of a subject or a course. For example, if we're talking about a subject that you study, for example, algebra, then you do not capitalize it. For example, if you say: "I'm studying algebra this year." Okay? So you're just talking about the subject, and therefore it's not capitalized. But if you're talking about the subject as a course, as the name of a course, then you do capitalize it. Okay? For example: "This year I'm taking Algebra 101." Okay? That's the name of that course, so you do capitalize it then. Okay? Let's look at another example. "She's studying psychology. This year she's studying... She's taking Psychology 201." Or: "She's enrolled in the Psychology 201 class." Okay? Excuse me. All right. Another example: "I would like to study business in university." Okay? The person is being very general, just talking about the subject. But: "This year I'm taking a course called Global Business." Okay? Now you're giving the name of the course, right? So what's the rule here? If we're just talking about the general subject, no capital; if we're talking about the course, then yes, we do capitalize it. Okay? All right. There is one little exception: When we're talking about languages, and this is always true. So if you're studying French or whether you're taking French 101, you're always going to capitalize the name of a language. Okay? And that's just because in English we always capitalize the name of a language; doesn't matter which one. Okay? That's it. All right. Now, when it comes to places, let's look at how it works. So, for example, if I say: "She works in a bank." Okay? A bank, the bank, it's just the place, the building or whatever. Okay? The business. So then it's not capitalized. But if I say: "She works at the Brookfield Bank", now I gave you the name of the bank, so therefore it is capitalized. Okay? Because, again, the name of something is capitalized; the name of a person, or a place. Right? So then it will be capitalized. Or I say: "I went to the library." Okay? "I often study at the library." Okay? Just a library in general, not capitalized. Or: "I often visit the Toronto Public Library." Now I'm giving you the name of a specific library, right? So, of course, it gets capitalized. Got it? Okay. Or: "He goes to university." Okay? He's in university, just a regular word so we don't capitalize it. But: "He got admission to the University of Oxford." Okay, now we're giving the name of the university, so you do have to capitalize it. Okay? Got it? All right. So I hope that's pretty clear so far. All right? So when we're giving the name of a course or we're giving a name of the particular place, like a bank, a library, university, a school, a business-right?-then you're going to capitalize it; and otherwise, in general, not. Okay. Now let's look when we're talking about professions and titles. So, the rule is like this: If you're just talking about... Let's say: "I went to see the doctor." Okay? Or: "I need to see a doctor." So if before the profession you say the word "a" or "the"-okay?-then you don't capitalize it because you're just talking about a doctor in general; you're not giving the name of the doctor, you're not saying which doctor. So, here we just say: "I need to see a doctor." Or: "I have an appointment with Dr. Patel." Now this is the name of the doctor, right? So then we need to capitalize the "D" for "Doctor" and, of course, his or her name. All right? Next: "I would like to speak to the professor." Okay? "The professor", again, general, so no capital, but here: "You need to make an appointment to see Professor Brown." […]
Countable and uncountable nouns | English grammar lesson
 
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Learn the difference between countable and uncountable nouns with this English grammar lesson. Countable nouns are separate objects that we can count. They have a singular and a plural form and we can use the indefinite article with them ("a" or "an") Uncountable nouns are things like liquids, materials or a mass of substance with no boundaries. They only have a singular form and we cannot use "a" or "an" before them. We can use the word "some", for example "There is some rice." Some nouns can be both countable and uncountable depending on the context or situation. It is very important to learn if a noun is countable or not because the English grammar rules for both types of nouns are different. There are subtitles (closed captions) during the video and the accent is a British English accent. Private English lessons & speaking practice: http://goo.gl/Fv0ybA More grammar lessons: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpS4_AM1c0s0ozpROeE2A9ff Listening exercises: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpRdmnAzmYwdc0Az0ZOG2XNA Vocabulary videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpTlYAYSitjwWn29BEdCBi9j Andrew, Crown Academy of English http://www.crownacademyenglish.com http://www.youtube.com/user/CrownAcademyEnglish https://twitter.com/Crown_English Photo credits: "Business Women Pointing" Image courtesy of photostock | FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Views: 278447 Crown Academy of English
Summary Writing |  Learn How to Write Summary
 
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This animation teaches the learner to define a summary, list the steps for creating a summary and create a sample summary based on the learning. This is a product of Mexus Education Pvt. Ltd., an education innovations company based in Mumbai, India. http://www.mexuseducation.com, http://www.ikenstore.in
Views: 619108 Iken Edu
In The Bathroom | Basic Vocabulary Practice | ESL | EFL
 
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Hello Everyone! This video is designed for students, teachers and anyone wanting to learn English. My videos are vocabulary-based for conversation practice. Each video is themed to provide context for learning. To insure success, every video is designed with open slots for vocabulary substitution practice. These patterns allow students to practice on their own and teachers can have their class practice together as a group. These videos also work great for icebreakers and class discussions. Please have fun and speak English now! Thank you for your kind support :) Mark Kulek Here is my eBook for 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume One. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MT6OZ54 and 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume Two: For those of you who are interested in teaching English to young learners. Please have a look at my blog, Sharing My Whiteboard. http://sharingmywhiteboard.blogspot.jp Thank you for your time.
Views: 63656 Mark Kulek
ARTICLE WRITING FORMAT CBSE// EASY LEARNING
 
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This video explains article writing according to CBSE format in a very quick and easy to understand way. 1. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HIMAALeasylearning/ 2. Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/easylearningwithhimaal/ 3. Email: [email protected]
MY TOP TIPS! Learn & Use More Phrasal Verbs | English Lesson
 
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Check your grammar with the Grammarly grammar checker: https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish WHY are PHRASAL VERBS so DIFFICULT to learn? - Because there are so many of them? - Because they are so commonly used that they can be overwhelming. - Because one phrasal verb can have multiple meanings - Many phrasal verbs are idiomatic, so their meaning is not always as the individual words suggest. In this lesson, I'll share 6 tips to help you learn and use more phrasal verbs, including: - What exactly is a Phrasal Verb? - Is it transitive or intransitive? - Is it separable or inseparable? - They're just multi-word verbs - HOW TO find the right phrasal verbs to practice - Practice USING phrasal verbs... The right way! Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/11/01/6-tips-learn-use-more-phrasal-verbs/ *I recommend* ⭐️Speak with native teachers... 30mins every day! Get a free 14-day trial here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ ⭐️Try Grammarly Grammar Checker - it's FREE! https://www.grammarly.com/mmmenglish ⭐️English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish On Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB On Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrRiVfHqBIIvSgKmgnSY66g?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO! Do your friends a favour and help to translate this lesson into your native language! Contribute subtitles translations here: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=8-ktHXX0BkI&ref=share Your name will be featured underneath the video 😃 Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 306919 mmmEnglish
Relative Pronouns & Clauses - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, we're going to look at the use of words such as 'who', 'whom', 'whose', 'which', 'that' etc. when they are used as relative pronouns to connect two clauses. We will also look at when you can drop these words in a complex sentence. Join my complete self-study programme to reach all your English language goals: https://www.anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Happy studies!
Views: 925208 Anglo-Link
Grammar: Using THE with common and abstract nouns
 
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An abstract noun is a word that means a general concept or idea, like "life" or "friendship". We can use "the" with common nouns, as in "the sky is blue". But can we use "the" with abstract nouns? For example, would you say "happiness is important" or "the happiness is important"? If you are not sure, watch this lesson to learn when to use "the" with general and abstract nouns. Don't forget to take the quiz afterwards to test your understanding! http://www.engvid.com/grammar-the-common-abstract-nouns/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. Many English learners have trouble deciding when to use "the" or no "the", so I understand that problem, I know it can be a little bit confusing, but I believe that by the end of this lesson, you're going to find it much easier. Okay? So let's start with a little quiz first to see where you stand regarding that word "the". So, let's look at this first example. Should you say: "Life is beautiful." or "The life is beautiful."? Okay. Think about it. Decide. Another one: "Friendship is precious." or "The friendship is precious."? Which one is right? Think for yourself. We'll do one more, and then I'll give you the answers. "Happiness is important." or "The happiness is important."? Which one is correct? Do you know? How do you know? How do you decide which one is right? I'll tell you. When we're talking about something which is a general concept or idea, then we do not use "the". Okay? For example, let's take the first one. "Life is beautiful." Now, life is a general concept, so we do not need "the". So, this is the correct answer. All right? Not this. "Life is beautiful." Because life is a general idea, a general concept. Okay? We're not talking about anything specific. If we say: "The life of wise people is beautiful." that is something specific, and then we would be correct to say: "The life". Okay? But if we're just talking in general, then no "the". Let's look at the next example. "Friendship is precious." Again, friendship is a general idea or a general concept, so this is correct. Okay? In this example, this one was wrong. But if I said, for example: "The friendship between those two children is precious." then that would be fine, because now I'm specifying which friendship. Right? The friendship between those two children, so then it becomes specific, and then we would use "the". But in this example, this is correct. Okay? Just like this was, and this is wrong, because this is a general idea. Okay? Next one: "Happiness is important." By now you know, again, happiness is a general idea, a general concept, so this is correct. In this example, it would be wrong to say: "The happiness", because: The happiness of what? So, if we say: "The happiness of my family is important." that's fine. That's very good. That would be a perfect sentence. But in this case, we cannot say: "The happiness is important." because we didn't specify which happiness. Okay? So, in this case, that's wrong, and this is correct. Okay? Now, the same principle applies to these. See if you can figure it out. Okay? "I want to make money." or "I want to make the money."? Which one do you think is right? Are we speaking in general, or are we speaking specifically? Well, we are speaking in general right now, so this is correct, because we're just talking about money; we didn't say which money. I want to make money. Right? General idea. If I said, for example: "I want to make the money I need to pay my rent." that's specific, so then I could say: "the money", because I'm explaining after that which money. Okay? But in this example, no. Next one: "She wants to lose weight." or "She wants to lose the weight."? Is it general or is it specific? What do you think? It's still general. Good. By now you're getting really smart. "She wants to lose weight." is a general term. Right? We're just talking about weight in general; not any specific weight. But if I say: "She wants to lose the weight she put on during the holidays." that's specific, and then I need "the". Okay? But not in this example. So, last one here: "He needs to earn respect." or do we say: "He needs to earn the respect."? Is it general or is it specific? By now you know, you'll really know. It's general. Very good. Okay? Because we didn't talk about any specific respect; we're talking about respect in general. So: "He needs to earn respect." But if this was being used, it would be something like: "He needs to earn the respect of his peers." Peers are people your age. Okay? Or: "He needs to earn the respect of his employees." for example, or "of his parents". Then it becomes specific. Which respect? The respect of his parents, the respect of his employees. All right? So, if it was specific, then we could say "the", but when we're just talking in general, we don't need "the". "Life is beautiful.", "Friendship is precious.", "Happiness is important.", "I want to make money.", "She wants to lose weight.", "He needs to earn respect."
Teaching grammar in school context
 
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This video shows an English teacher conducts a lesson in which she helps students learn how to use adjectives and adverbs.
My teaching approach for Spanish grammar teaching in Indian context
 
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Description of the pedagogy used by Spanish language teaching professional Mr. Anshu Shekhar (New Delhi, INDIA)
Views: 133 Anshu Shekhar
Live English Class | At Home | Rooms and Household Items | Teaching Children | ESL | EFL
 
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Hello Everyone! This video is designed for students, teachers and anyone wanting to learn English. My videos are vocabulary-based for conversation practice. Each video is themed to provide context for learning. To insure success, every video is designed with open slots for vocabulary substitution practice. These patterns allow students to practice on their own and teachers can have their class practice together as a group. These videos also work great for icebreakers and class discussions. Please have fun and speak English now! Thank you for your kind support :) Mark Kulek Here are my T-Shirts / Coffee Mug: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/100051466?noCache=true Here are my Conversation Cards: http://www.englishbooks.jp/catalog/index.php/MSC-Press-m-147 Here are my ebooks: 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume One: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MT6OZ54 25 Short Simple Conversations Volume Two: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B014MN7ESQ For those of you who are interested in teaching English to young learners. Please have a look at my blog: Sharing My Whiteboard. http://sharingmywhiteboard.blogspot.jp Thank you for your support. #EnglishSpeakingPractice
Views: 19997 Mark Kulek
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
Khan Academy Live: SAT Reading Class
 
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Need help with SAT reading? Join Eric, one of Khan Academy’s SAT experts, for an SAT reading class. During class, Eric explains a proactive approach to answering reading questions and walks through some of the most common types of questions. This is an edited version of our livestream from March 2, 2017. RSVP for our additional live SAT classes: Khan Academy Live: SAT Writing on 3/9 https://www.facebook.com/events/1207342579373551/ Check out Official SAT Practice on Khan Academy - it’s free! http://www.khanacademy.org/sat
Views: 165268 Khan Academy
Indian Constitution - Complete Course on Indian Polity for UPSC CSE
 
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Indian Constitution - Complete Course on Indian Polity for UPSC CSE: This lesson is a complete course on Indian Polity and will deal with the ground norm of the country - The Indian Constitution. The Constitution of India is the supreme law of India. It lays down the framework defining fundamental political principles, establishes the structure, procedures, powers and duties of government institutions and sets out fundamental rights, directive principles and the duties of citizens. It is the longest written constitution of any sovereign country in the world. The nation is governed by it. B. R. Ambedkar is regarded as its chief architect. This course will be helpful for the IAS exam aspirants and aspirants of all government exams. Download the Unacademy Learning App from the Google Play Store here:- https://goo.gl/02OhYI Download the Unacademy Educator app from the Google Play Store here: https://goo.gl/H4LGHE Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://goo.gl/gycFVs
Views: 726176 Unacademy
Definite and Indefinite Articles in English A, An, The How to use articles 'a', 'an', and 'the'?
 
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An orange or the orange? Definite and Indefinite Articles in English A, An, The How to use articles 'a', 'an', and 'the'? Noun indefinite article (plural indefinite articles) (grammar) A word preceding a noun to indicate that the noun refers to any member of the class of objects named by the noun. Noun definite article (plural definite articles) (grammar) An article that introduces a noun and specifies it as the particular noun that is being considered; in English, the only definite article is the. Skype: agharta78 The Definitive Collection: English Prepositions Solved Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Definitive-Collection-Prepositions-Real-World-Examples-ebook/dp/B00D48GQO4 Paperback: http://www.amazon.com/Definitive-Collection-English-Prepositions-Grammar/dp/1493775367/
Views: 2752 THIS IS NOT GRAMMAR
SCHOOL SCN Grammar of Context
 
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Secondary School Grammar of Context
Views: 632 Rodney Jones
How The Buddha Taught - The Importance Of Context December 20 2017
 
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This is my Wednesday Dhamma talk on the direct teachings of the Buddha as preserved in the sutta Pitaka, the second book of the Pali Canon. These talks are streamed live every Wednesday at noon Eastern US time. My Wednesday noon podcast on December 20, 2017 will be on the importance of understanding the overall context of the Buddha’s teachings in order to appropriately apply and individual teaching. A related article is here: https://becoming-buddha.com/becoming-explained-the-loka-bhava-and-mula-suttas/ Siddartha Gotama awakened, gained full human maturity, and became Buddha. He spent the last forty-five years of his life teaching anyone interested to do the same. The purpose of these talks is to clearly present these teachings free of the adaptations, alterations, and embellishments that have developed since Siddartha Gotama’s passing. Siddartha Gotama awakened to Dependent Origination which clearly and directly shows that it is ignorance of Four Noble Truths results in ongoing disappointment, unsatisfactoriness, and suffering - in a word Dukkha. He taught an Eightfold Path to become empty of ignorance. Subtle but very effective strategies have developed due to the need for continued self-establishment to ignore this basic ignorance. I will occasionally discuss the confused and contradictory modern “dharma’s” and the continuation of ignorance and suffering that follows. An audio only version of this video is available at my podcast archive: https://becoming-buddha.com/becoming-buddha-podcast/ A video of our classes including a beginning Shamatha-Vipassana meditation is available here: https://becoming-buddha.com/dhamma-stream-videos/ Here is the archive for all of my Dhamma articles and talks: https://becoming-buddha.com/dhamma-articles-and-talks-archive/ If you find benefit from this talk please consider a donation: https://becoming-buddha.com/support-john-and-becoming-buddha-com/ Thank You. Peace.
Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes - Present, Past, Future | Simple, Continuous, Perfect
 
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Learn all of the 12 tenses in English easily in this lesson. This lesson features simple explanations, lots of example sentences and illustrations. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 5. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 2016254 Learn English Lab
PHILOSOPHY - Plato
 
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Plato was one of the world's earliest and possibly greatest philosophers. He matters because of his devotion to making humanity more fulfilled. For gifts and more from The School of Life, visit our online shop: https://goo.gl/3ZFSG4 Download our App: https://goo.gl/1dAqFd FURTHER READING “Athens, 2400 years ago. It’s a compact place: around 250,000 people live here. There are fine baths, theatres, temples, shopping arcades and gymnasiums. Art is flourishing, and science too. You can pick up excellent fish down at the harbour in Piraeus. It’s warm for more than half the year....” You can read more on this and other topics on our blog TheBookofLife.org at this link: https://goo.gl/jz5X7R MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://goo.gl/2wgdOx Watch more films on PHILOSOPHY in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLphilosophy Do you speak a different language to English? Did you know you can submit Subtitles on all of our videos on YouTube? For instructions how to do this click here: https://goo.gl/eHxZmW SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Download our App: https://goo.gl/1dAqFd Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Mad Adam http://www.madadamfilms.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 3135038 The School of Life
10 Tips To Build Your Vocabulary | Learn More English Words
 
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Mentioned in this video: ➡️ mmmEnglish Imitation lessons: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2/ ➡️ AUDIBLE (Get your first audiobook for FREE!) http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish ➡️ RYPE: Speak with native teachers... As much as you want! https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ What's the best way to learn English vocabulary? How can I learn more words? The truth is, that to successfully learn new vocabulary, you need to create good study habits, keep it interesting and make sure that you are having fun! Building your English vocabulary is something that you should be doing, every day... So, you need to find fun and interesting ways to do it! In this video, I’m going to talk about a number of different tools and techniques that you can use to improve your vocabulary - you might not like all of them, but you will definitely enjoy some of them! And hopefully, you can make them part of your daily or weekly routine. AND if you’ve got your own suggestions about ways to learn vocabulary, make sure you add them in the comments!! Share the love! 10 TIPS FOR LEARNING NEW VOCABULARY! 1. Get better at studying new words! 2. When you do learn new words, don’t learn words on their own! 3. Learn new vocabulary through stories. Stories are FULL of new words, phrases and interesting expressions that show you how words come together in an interesting, fun and engaging way! You’re not only learning what words to use but how to use them! For pre-intermediate/intermediate learners, I recommend: - Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney - Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown - Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher - Charlotte’s Web by E.B.White For upper-intermediate/advanced learners: - James and The Giant Peach by Roald Dahl - The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Animal Farm by George Orwell 4. Listen while you read. You can find the AUDIO books for almost any book you can imagine. Which is great, because HEARING how English words are pronounced is so important I use Audible to download my audio books and listen to them while I’m jogging, travelling or even drifting off to sleep! Choose your first audiobook and TRY IT FOR FREE here: http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish 5. Learn new vocabulary through songs. You can easily find the lyrics to heaps of other English songs at metrolyrics: http://www.metrolyrics.com/ (If you know some good songs to practice with, post your suggestions in the comments below and share your love of English music!) Lyrics Training is great - lots of fun! https://lyricstraining.com/ Here’s a couple on the mmmEnglish website: The Lazy Song – Bruno Mars https://www.mmmenglish.com/2015/12/16/sing-english-the-lazy-song/ (Sitting On) The Dock of the Bay – Otis Reading https://www.mmmenglish.com/2016/01/09/sing-english-sitting-on-the-dock-of-the-bay/ 6. Get Better At Using Online dictionaries! Macmillan Dictionary - http://www.macmillandictionary.com/ Oxford Dictionary - https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/ Cambridge Dictionary - http://dictionary.cambridge.org/ 7. Use labels & flashcards Anki App - https://www.ankiapp.com/ 8. Describe the world around you. 9. Imitate a native speaker. Imitating a native English speaker will help you: - learn new vocabulary and expressions, in context - improve your English pronunciation - sound more natural, like a native English speaker - feel more confident in conversations with native speakers Try the mmmEnglish imitation Lessons! Series 1 (Storytelling) https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation/ Free sample: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZGf8JY5_ck Series 2 (Describing People) https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2/ Free sample: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmU_pN0bEn8 10. If you are at an Intermediate English level, speak and practise being in conversations. Cambly: https://www.cambly.com Lingoda: https://www.lingoda.com If you are a busy person trying to learn English, you need to try Rype! Practice at any time, as often as you like… With native teachers! And I can help you to try Rype for TWO WEEKS, FOR FREE! , right here: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/07/24/10-tips-to-build-your-vocabulary/ *I recommend* Get Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE! grammarly.com/mmmenglish English Listening practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Speak with native teachers... As much as you want! https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ CONTACT mmmEnglish: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish Find me on Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB Find me on Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 876238 mmmEnglish
Context Clue Practice Review
 
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Teacher think aloud reviewing answers to a practice exercise using context clues to guess at meanings of unfamiliar words in a passage from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
Views: 281 frazerenglish
HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN - How to Use These Forms Correctly (with Examples) - English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use have been / has been / had been correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. Most Common MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://goo.gl/n8BJ7v 2. HAVE HAD / HAS HAS / HAD HAD: https://goo.gl/Aj3hRD 3. SHOULD HAVE / COULD HAVE / WOULD HAVE: https://goo.gl/X2bw7J 4. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://goo.gl/oC2qKX 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://goo.gl/A3VuGh 6. All MODAL VERBS lessons: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 Transcript: ‘Have been’, ‘has been’ and ‘had been’. These forms cause a lot of confusion for many people. Well, in this video, I will clear up that confusion. I’m going to teach you the three main uses of these forms how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. Alright, let’s get started. Before we talk about the uses, you need to know the basics of where to use have, has and had been: in the present, if the subject of a sentence is I/You/We/They or a plural noun, then we use ‘have been’. If the subject is He/She/It or a singular noun, then we use ‘has been’. This is when we talk about the present. When we talk only about the past, it’s very easy. For any subject, we use ‘had been’. OK, let me test you: what do we use with He/She/It or a singular noun in the present? We use ‘has been’. What about with I/You/We/They or plural nouns? We use ‘have been’. And in the past tense? We use ‘had been’ for all subjects. Good, so let’s now look at the first use of these forms. This is in the present perfect tense. That is, to talk about actions or situations that started in the past and are still continuing. Here’s an example: “I have been working as a teacher for 7 years.” In speech, we usually shorten ‘I have’ to ‘I’ve’ – “I’ve been working as a teacher for 7 years.” Let’s look at a timeline for this. You know that I started working as a teacher seven years ago (or in 2010 because at the time of filming this video, right now, it’s 2017), and I’m still a teacher, so this action – ‘working’ is continuing. In this sentence, we can also say: “I have been working as a teacher since 2010.” The difference between ‘for’ and ‘since’ is that if you want to mention the duration (or amount of time), then you use ‘for’ (like ‘for 7 years’). If you want to mention the starting point of the action or situation, use ‘since’ (as in ‘since 2010’). Here’s another example: let’s say that this lady wants to see the doctor. Her appointment was at 3 o’clock. She came to the hospital at 3, but the doctor wasn’t there. So she started waiting at 3 o’clock and she’s still waiting – let’s say it’s 5 o’clock now, so two hours have passed. So what can we say? We can say: “She has been waiting for two hours.” or “She has been waiting since 3 o’clock.” In natural speech, we say he‘s been and she’s been: “She’s been waiting”. OK have a look at this sentence: “He has been the CEO of the company for four months” or we can say ‘since June’ because that’s when he started. Here, we don’t have an –ing verb like ‘working’ or ‘waiting’. That’s because we don’t want to focus on any action, we just want to express the situation – that he became the CEO in June and he’s still the CEO. Here’s another example: “They’ve been married for 25 years / since 1992.” When did they get married? In 1992. Are they still married now? Yes. So, they’ve been married for 25 years now. OK, so what about ‘had been’? Well, let’s change our sentences a little bit: “I had been working as a teacher for 7 years when I quit my job.” Ah, we see a different meaning here. It means that I started working as a teacher at some point in the past, I was a teacher for 7 years, but then I quit. So now, I am no longer a teacher. I want you to notice that there are two past actions here: one continuous action (“I had been working as a teacher”) and a single finished action at the end of that (“I quit”). Compare this to the previous sentence – “I have been working as a teacher” – here, there is only one continuous action and it’s still continuing, it’s not finished. So, please remember this rule: only use ‘had been’ if there were two events in the past: a continuing action or a situation and a single, finished action. So let’s go back to the other sentences. With these, we can say: “She had been waiting for two hours when the doctor finally arrived.” “He’d been the CEO of the company for only four months when it went bankrupt.” ‘Went bankrupt’ means the company lost all its money and closed down. “They had been married for 25 years when they divorced.” So are they still married? Unfortunately, no. Just like the sentences with ‘have been’ and ‘has been’ are in the present perfect tense, the sentences with ‘had been’ are in the past perfect tense.
Views: 1679240 Learn English Lab
How to write the problem statement in your research proposal, manuscript or thesis
 
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I am going to show you how to captivate your reader so your paper or proposal will be the absolute best. In this video I am going to talk about making the research problem clear. If you are watching this, you probably already know that you need a problem statement. But did you know that articulating your problem statement may actually be the most important step for justifying your research purpose? ~~~~ References Annersten, M., & Wredling, R. (2006). How to write a research proposal. European Diabetes Nursing, 3(2), 102-5. Colling, J. (2003). Demystifying nursing research. Demystifying nursing research: defining the problem to be studied. Urologic Nursing 23, no. 3: 225-226. Creswell, J. W., & Poth, C. N. (2018). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. LoBiondo-Wood, G., Haber, J., Cameron, C., & Singh, M.D. (2013). Nursing research in Canada: Methods, critical appraisal, and utilization (3rd Edition). Toronto, Canada: Mosby/Elsevier. Merrill, K. C. (2011). Developing an effective quantitative research proposal. Journal of Infusion Nursing, 34(3), 181-186. DOI: 10.1097/NAN.0b013e3182117204 Siedlecki, S. (2008). Making a difference through research. AORN Journal, 88(5), 716-6+. doi:10.1016/j.aorn.2008.07.023 ~~~~ Clearly articulating the gap in current knowledge logically leads the reader to how your study will contribute to existing knowledge. This gap is broken down in the background section by critiquing previous research, but you also need to make sure you explicitly outline the gap in a problem statement. Your goal is to make it clear enough that anyone will see the problem the way you do. Make sure you understand what the problem is before you start to write. In order to create a logical argument to study an issue you need to know what the problem is. Your problem should be interesting, clinically significant and feasible. If you aren’t sure what the problem is talk to people in the field because they are the best position to identify meaningful issues in need of study and ask important questions that will impact outcomes. If you pick a problem that aligns with the needs of an organisation or funding agency you are more likely to get funding. ... A general problem statement should be found in the introduction section of a paper. Tell the reader why the topic matters. This statement will lead to the background or literature review, which examines the scope and magnitude of the issue in more detail. The purpose of placing a problem statement in the introduction section of your paper is to catch the reader’s attention early. Your teacher may call this part of the paper or proposal the significance of the issue. ... Before you state the problem you should start by recapping what you just told the reader the current state of knowledge is about your topic within your discipline. Think of this sentence as the lead-in to the problem. Now comes the critical step of articulating the problem that your study will then help to solve. The actual problem statement serves as a clear transition from the literature review to the study purpose. Your purpose or research question will help to solve your problem. Therefore the problem statement and research purpose need to support each other. By the time the reader reaches your purpose they should already have an idea what it will be and know why it is an important. It is also helpful to state the consequences of either filling or not filling the gap in knowledge. If you establish the importance of the issue for your audience here your proposal will be more likely to get the attention of other researchers, key stakeholders or funding agencies. ... Articulating the problem statement is a difficult task. Like the purpose, you should revisit, critique and revise it several times throughout your proposal or paper writing process. Every time you make a decision about the study ask yourself if what you are doing helps to solve your problem and answer your question. ~~~~ http://youstudynursing.com/ Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GLH8R9C Related Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AcDWoE3fxbfd37_NXSEDq5w Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/youstudynursing https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 39893 NurseKillam
9/11 Timeline: The Attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City | History
 
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A timeline of the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001. #HistoryChannel Subscribe for more from HISTORY: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=historychannel Check out exclusive HISTORY content: Website - http://www.history.com Twitter - https://twitter.com/history/posts Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/History Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+HISTORY HISTORY®, now reaching more than 98 million homes, is the leading destination for award-winning original series and specials that connect viewers with history in an informative, immersive, and entertaining manner across all platforms. The network’s all-original programming slate features a roster of hit series, epic miniseries, and scripted event programming. Visit us at HISTORY.com for more info.
Views: 3951383 HISTORY
The Handmaids Tale Part 1: Crash Course Literature #403
 
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In which John Green teaches you about Margaret Atwood's speculative fiction novel, The Handmaid's Tale. John looks at some of the themes in this classic dystopian novel, many of which are kind of a downer. The world of Gilead that Atwood created looks at a lot of the issues that we deal with today, and the very human impulse to return to an imagined golden era, thereby solving all of our modern world's problems. Yeah, it doesn't work like that. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, Robert Kunz, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Daniel Baulig, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, Jessica Wode, Cami Wilson, Eric Prestemon, Evren Türkmenoğlu, Alexander Tamas, Justin Zingsheim, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Tom Trval, mark austin, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Kathrin Janßen, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, Cody Carpenter, Annamaria Herrera, Nathan Taylor, William McGraw, Bader AlGhamdi, Vaso, Melissa Briski, Joey Quek, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Alex S, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Montather, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters, Sandra Aft, Jason A Saslow, Steve Marshall -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 448362 CrashCourse
How to write a literature review
 
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How to write a literature review. It’s easier than you might think! In this video, I demonstrate how to search the literature and identify relevant papers for your literature review. I do a pubmed search using Boolean operators and MeSH terms (these are extremely powerful tools that will help you sift through the large number of academic papers out there). So if you’re doing a master’s thesis or a PhD, or you’re doing research and writing a paper, at some point, you’ll need to do a lit review. A big part of that review is the search and this video is going to help you get that right. You might be doing a systematic literature review or meta-analysis – again, you’ll need to do a good PubMed search that identifies the right studies. Thanks to BMC !!! ----------------------------- This video was sponsored by BMC – (click here to go to BMC: https://goo.gl/RFaUA2 ). As a pioneer of open access publishing, BMC has an evolving portfolio of high-quality peer-reviewed journals including broad interest titles such as BMC Biology and BMC Medicine, specialist journals such as Malaria Journal and Microbiome, and the BMC series. BMC is committed to continual innovation to better support the needs of research communities, ensuring the integrity of the research we publish, and championing the benefits of open research. BMC is part of Springer Nature, giving us greater opportunities to help authors connect and advance discoveries across the world. I’m particularly excited about having BMC’s support because I’ve been working with them for nearly 15 years as the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Globalization and Health. I’ve been extremely impressed by them as a company that has integrity and that is truly making the world a better place. LEARN MORE about literature reviews ------------------------------------------------------------ Of course, there is more to a literature review than just the search. You need to have a structured approach to selecting paper, extracting data, writing the review itself and creating a bibliography. For more detail on these aspects of a literature review, go to www.learnmore365.com where I have a full course on literature review (it takes about 30 minutes to complete). About this channel ------------------------------ This channel posts global health and public health teaching videos and videos about how to find the right job in global health. If you haven't already, please consider subscribing to this channel and becoming part of this community. SUBSCRIBE: -------------------- Click here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=YourChannelNameHere LETS CONNECT: --------------------------- Twitter: @drgregmartin Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drgregmartin/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisweekinglobalhealth/ SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL ----------------------------------------- Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/drgregmartin
Theoretical Framework
 
07:55
A short introduction to theoretical frameworks and how to approach constructing one
Views: 221823 Francois J. Desjardins
017 - Can, Could, Be Able To & May - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! كيف تتعلم إنجليزي بسهولة With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Beginning English - 17 - Modal Verbs - Can, Could, Be Able To & May Lesson 17 - Modal Verbs - Can, Could, Be Able To & May Can, Could & Be Able To: (Possibility/Ability - Past) I/you/he/she/it/we/they could (not) verb./could(n't) verb. I was (not) able to verb. You were (not) able to verb. He/she/it was (not) able to verb. We/they were (not) able to verb. (Possibility/Ability - Present) I/you/he/she/it/we/they can(not) verb./ca(n't) verb. I am (not) able to verb. You are (not) able to verb. He/she/it is (not) able to verb. We/they are (not) able to verb. (Possibility/Ability - Future) I/you/he/she/it/we/they can(not) verb./could (not) verb./will (not) be able to verb. I am (not) going to be able to verb. You are (not) going to be able to verb. He/she/it is (not) going to be able to verb. We/they are (not) going to be able to verb. Permission Common, spoken English - Can I borrow a pen? More polite English - Could I borrow a pen? Most polite, standard English - May I borrow a pen? To learn more about our monthly Master English Conversation audio and video lessons, and to get fluent in English faster with our FREE newsletter and Email Video Course for students, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/
Views: 120352 EnglishAnyone
What's the Context? — Part 2 (Pilgrim's Progress Radio Broadcast, 8-21-2018)
 
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After a quick review of context (and the associated word textile) Jim Kerwin takes us through a "what is the context?" thought-exercise: from considering a single embroidered thread in a blouse (like a single verse); next seeing that thread in the context of an embroidered flower (like a small scripture passage or pericope); expanding our context, we appreciate the overall effect of the embroidered blouse (a larger section, like a chapter); then the full blouse (perhaps equivalent to a complete book of the Bible); and on to the outfit (a entire Testament, perhaps even the whole of the Scriptures); before finally seeing the person inside the outfit, an interesting way of illustrating Jesus' words in John 5:39. Jim does some unavoidable, reluctant, but equal-opportunity toe-stomping. Along the way, he comments on the deceptive nature of those late-date, man-made additions to the text, additions which we call chapters and verses, then begins to give examples of context and how it affects our understanding of some typical Scripture passages, including: how passages like the Gospel accounts of the Last Supper and the women who washed or anointed Jesus' feet are illuminated by knowing that the participants didn't sit in chairs at a table; John 3:16; Philippians 4:13; 1 Corinthians 13:8-11, in the context of 1 Corinthians 13; then 1 Corinthians 13 in the context of chapters 12-14; and chapters 12-14 in the light of the entire First Corinthian epistle, especially the clear limitation of what Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 3:1-3. Tomorrow: We finished today's broadcast with a head-first dive into "wives, submit" and "husbands, love" in Ephesians 5:22-24, and hint at where the surprising context of those controversial commands is going to lead us tomorrow! Also in the next broadcast (Lord willing): We deal with the bugbear of Romans 7, and then march right up to the Gate of Hades in Matthew 16. Follow-Along Notes: Jim had provided us with a PDF of his presentation slides for Hermeneutics 1. Download them free from this link: Hermeneutics-1-slides-NPC-2018-08-20-24. Links: For more of Jim's teaching (and those of his teacher/father in the Lord, Percy Gutteridge) visit http://FinestOfTheWheat.org. Be used by the Lord to make the October/November missions-teaching trip to Perú possible by contributing at https://finestofthewheat.org/paypalmissions. Sign up for the monthly newsletter at https://finestofthewheat.org/ccnpc for mission reports, insights, announcements on new Bible-teaching articles, and more. Like Finest of the Wheat Fellowship's Facebook page -- https://finestofthewheat.org/fb -- for featured Bible-teaching articles each week, as well as regular Powerful Poetry links. Visit our webpage, http:/www.nationalprayerchapel.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NationalPrayerChapel/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/NtlPrayerChapel
Views: 29 Pilgrim's Progress
Modal verbs - Can and Could - English Grammar lesson
 
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Modal verbs - Can and Could - English Grammar lesson : In this lesson Rachna explains the difference between 'could' and 'can' when expressing possibility? Most of the time it is clear from the context, but use of can can also express possibility (rather than ability). For example, giving advice answering the question: How can/could I improve my English? You can/could listen to the radio, watch TV and read the newspaper. Both are possible. Students want to know when to use 'could' and when to use 'can'. Similarly, How could I improve my English? is more a request for advice, whereas How can I improve my English?is more a factual question about available options. (But of course we can also answer this question by giving advice.) Can and could, like the other modal verbs, have developed quite a range of meanings and uses. You ask how to explain the difference, and explanation can certainly help, but learning all the ins and outs of these verbs is a long process which requires plenty of experience, observation and experiment. Watch this video lesson to understand when to use Can and Could. Enjoy!
001 - Singular & Plural Nouns (cup→cups) 1 - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! Learn basic English grammar! With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 1 - Singular and Plural Nouns Learn some basic nouns, their plural forms, the numbers one and two and how to use not (negation). For more tips, lessons and videos, and to discover the 7 secrets to becoming a confident, fluent English speaker easily and automatically, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/.
Views: 253775 EnglishAnyone
Globalization explained (explainity® explainer video)
 
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Globalization is a topic that is often debated controversally. It concerns all of us, but what exactly is globalization and what is its impact on every single one of us? explainity tackles exactly this question and gives some answers in this short clip. Script download: www.explainity.com/education-project/transskripte/ ------- This explainer video was produced by explainity GmbH Homepage: www.explainity.com E-Mail: [email protected] This explanatory film was produced and published for private, non-commercial use and may be used free of charge in this context for private purposes without consultation or written authorization. Please note, however, that neither the content nor the graphics of this explanatory film may be altered in any way. Please always give explainity as the source when using the film, and if you publish it on the internet, provide a reference to www.explainity.com. For commercial use or use for training purposes, such as projection of the film at training events (e.g. projection of the film as a teaching aid in school or in adult education), a licence is required. Further information on this subject will be found here: https://www.explainity.com/education-project If you are interested in an own explainity explainer video, visit our website www.explainity.com and contact us. We are looking forward to your inquiry.
Views: 1259756 explainitychannel
Indian Constitution Telugu HD
 
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Ambiment - The Ambient by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100630 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 180757 Digital Reading

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