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Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 529768 Khan Academy
Bonds: Spot Rates vs. Yield to Maturity
 
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What's the difference between a spot rate and a bond's yield-to-maturity? In this video you'll learn how to find the price of the bond using spot rates, as well as how to find the yield-to-maturity of a bond once we know it's price. Simply put, spot rates are used to discount cash flows happening at a particular point in time, back to time 0. A bond's yield-to-maturity is the overall return that the investor will make by purchasing the bond - think of it as a weighted average!
Views: 5486 Arnold Tutoring
Bonds | Confused between the rates: Spot, Forward, Coupon, Current Yield, IRR, YTM, BEY
 
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CFA | FRM | SFM | Excel Live Classes | Videos Available Globally For Details: www.aswinibajaj.com WhatsApp: +91 9831149876 or https://api.whatsapp.com/send?phone=919830497377&text=Want%20to%20know%20more%20about%20classes & we shall get back to you. E-mail: [email protected] Hope you had a great learning experience! Do Like and Subscribe! And check our other videos on Finance (CFA, FRM, SFM), Resume making, Career options, etc. Click to access playlist. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyt8... Thank you.
Views: 13224 ASWINI BAJAJ
Bonds: Spot Rates from Forward Rates
 
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Learn the difference between a forward rate and a spot rate, and how to determine spot rates from forward rates by setting up equivalent expressions. Then you can use those spot rates to calculate the price of a coupon-paying bond.
Views: 6984 Arnold Tutoring
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 515191 Khan Academy
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
How rising interest rates may impact bonds
 
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Pacer ETFs President Sean O’Hara discusses how rising interest rates are impacting bonds and where investors should allocate their capital.
Views: 1288 Fox Business
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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Why buy a bond that pays no interest? This video helps you understand what a zero coupon bond is and how it can be beneficial. It details when you should expect to receive a return after buying a zero coupon bond and some of its unique features. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 37179 Zions TV
3 Bond Funds to Protect Against Rising Interest Rates
 
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When interest rates rise, investors with exposure to longer-term bonds could see their value fall. We explain what can you do to protect against duration risk. Studio Guest: Emma Morgan, Portfolio Manager, Morningstar http://www.morningstar.co.uk -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Should You Be Worried About the Economy?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUzqTPeI9IM -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 6865 Morningstar UK
Bonds, the Bond Markets and Interest Rates
 
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This video is an introduction to bonds, the bond markets, and how the bond prices affect interest rates and GDP.
Views: 635 mcneilecon
Currencies and rates. Works just like bonds
 
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When rates go up bond prices go down and vice-versa. Same exact thing with currencies.
Views: 657 Michael Norman
What rising interest rates mean for municipal bonds
 
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John Miller, Nuveen head of municipals, discusses how municipal bonds have been performing in an environment of rising rates.
Views: 472 CNBC Television
Face value, Coupon and Maturity of Bonds - SmarterWithMoney
 
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Investing in bonds can be tricky in today's market. Understanding the fundamental concepts associated with bonds is a good place to start.
Views: 24036 Religare
Bonds - Coupon and Market Rates Differ
 
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Lesson discussing how the value of a bond changes when coupon rates and market rates differ. Looks at why a bond will trade at a premium, discount, or at par For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 3766 Harpett
Bonds, Interest Rates, and the Impact of Inflation
 
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This educational video discusses the basics of bonds. People interested in investing should speak with their financial advisor. The video was produced by Mark Matos, a financial advisor in Naples FL. Blog: http://www.globalwealthconsultants.com/Blog.aspx Follow me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mark.matos Google+: https://plus.google.com/+MarkMatos1 Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markamatos Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarkAMatos Music by Chris Zabriskie
Views: 5099 The Rebel Outpost
Rising Interest Rates and Bonds
 
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Adam Bold, founder and CEO of The Mutual Fund Store, worries about a bond bubble in the current interest rate environment.
Views: 1600 Financial Engines
Market Decode: The Relationship Between Rising Interest Rates and Bonds (and Why Bonds Still Matter)
 
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Rising interest rates can push down the price of existing bonds (also referred to as fixed income), which in turn could directly affect the current value of your bond holdings. As Diczok notes in this latest episode of Market Decode, this doesn’t make bonds any less essential to a well-diversified portfolio—especially as volatility or a market drop can have an impact on the value of your stocks. For more on this topic, go to https://www.ml.com/articles/stocks-or-bond-what-happens-when-rates-rise.html
Views: 301 MerrillLynch
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 245759 Khan Academy
How Will Higher Interest Rates Affect High Yield Bonds?
 
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May 28 -- Franklin Templeton Fixed Income Group Senior Vice President Eric Takaha discusses the bond markets. He speaks on “Market Makers.” -- Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg Bloomberg Television offers extensive coverage and analysis of international business news and stories of global importance. It is available in more than 310 million households worldwide and reaches the most affluent and influential viewers in terms of household income, asset value and education levels. With production hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong, the network provides 24-hour continuous coverage of the people, companies and ideas that move the markets.
Views: 4192 Bloomberg
How Do Interest Rates Affect Bonds?
 
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The traditional view of bonds as safe places to stash money you’ll soon need to access doesn’t square with the current rising-interest-rate environment. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a retail investor in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a low-risk asset class in which to stash some of it, and that bonds are among the best options of that type. But -- with deepest thanks and apologies to Jane Austen -- universally acknowledged truths sometimes turn out to be false, under certain circumstances. Case in point, from deep in this month's Motley Fool Answers mailbag comes a query from a listener who was disturbed to read an article in The New York Times asserting that corporate debt is experiencing a valuation bubble, and that bond funds have become a riskier place to invest than most people recognize. Is this true, he asks, and if so, what should an investor do in response? To answer, special guest Buck Hartzell, director of Investor Learning and Operations at The Motley Fool, joins hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp in this segment. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 353 The Motley Fool
Is It a Bad Idea to Buy Bonds When Interest Rates Are Going Up?
 
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http://IncredibleRetirement.com 800-393-1017 Here’s something I bet you didn't know. The U.S. stock market, the size of the U.S. stock market is about $30 trillion. If you added up the value of all publicly traded stocks in the U.S., the market value of all those companies would come up to around $30 trillion, but what about bonds? Bonds are hardly ever mentioned or talked about in the financial media, but I bet you might be surprised to discover that the U.S. bond market is actually much bigger than the stock market. The U.S. bond market is estimated to be $40 trillion or more. That's right, the bond market is actually larger than the stock market and yet the financial media has almost all their attention and therefore our attention on the stock market. So what about bonds? Should you be buying bonds when interest rates are going up? You may have heard that when interest rates go up, bond values go down, which is true. Think of a seesaw or a teeter totter, the end that goes up is interest rates and the end that goes down is the underlying value of the bond. Bonds by the way are nothing more than a loan to a company or government or government agency. Typically bonds pay their interest twice a year, every six months, and when the loan comes due, they have a maturity date which could range anywhere from 90 days to 30 years, when you get your money back. If you look at long term returns of investments, let's say 15 year timeframe or longer, then it's no secret stocks have outperformed bonds by a large, large margin; so if stocks do better than bonds over the long term why not just have all of your money in stocks? Well the problem is while stocks tend to deliver nice, long term returns, but the short term oh, that could be a whole other story. Stocks on the short term can be extremely volatile. Just look what happened in the financial crisis of 2008. The S&P 500, the 500 largest publically traded companies in America, lost about 38% in value. So $100,000 in the S&P 500 at the end of 2008 was now worth $62,000. Ouch! That's a lot of short term volatility which tends to make you and I uncomfortable, to say the least. So how do we dampen or minimize that volatility? Imagine you have a sailboat and you have entered it into a race. One way to make your sailboat go faster is to make it lighter. But the lighter the sailboat, the more likely it is to capsize with a gust of wind. To prevent that you add weight or ballast to the sailboat. That slows the speed of the boat down but it reduces the odds of the boat capsizing and sinking. This is how you should think of bonds in your overall investment strategy. They are going to slow down the overall growth of your investment accounts but they are there to keep you from capsizing, to keep you from sinking during short-term periods of market volatility. So the answer to the question should you buy bonds, even when interest rates are going up, as a long term investor, the answer is a qualified yes, and here's what I mean by that. If you buy individual bonds and hold the bond until it matures or is called away early by the issuer then you'll receive the interest and get all your money back when the bond matures. The value of the bond can and will fluctuate while you own it, but it doesn't affect you if you hold it to maturity because then you get all your money back. This is why it's important to own individual bonds, especially in a rising interest rate environment, you don't lose money if you hold the bond until maturity. Why not just use a bond mutual fund? The problem with a bond mutual fund is it doesn't have a maturity date. People are constantly adding or withholding money from the mutual fund itself and typically at the wrong time. In a rising interest rate market, a lot of people in bond mutual funds take some or all of their money out of the mutual fund which forces the mutual fund manager to sell bonds even if they didn't want to. They have to generate the money to pay back the investors and that could drive the value or the price of bonds down even further. Ideally, you want to use individual bonds so you know for sure you get your money back when the bond matures. If you have a small account, and I would say a small account would be $200,000 or less, then you may not have enough money to properly diversify into individual bonds and you may have to still use bond mutual funds and if that's the case in a rising interest rate market you want to focus on short term bond funds or floating rate bond funds. Buying individual bonds as part of your investment strategy will help you move one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want, when you want.
Views: 1087 Brian Fricke
Bonds & Yields - part 3 (Hindi), Inflation vs Interest rates, बॉन्ड्स और यील्ड - 3
 
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This video explains the relationship between inflation and interest rates along with bond prices and rates. This video explains inflation and its effect on interest earned by investors. यह विडियो महंगाई दर और इंटरेस्ट रेट के बीच के सम्बन्ध को समझाता है, की किस प्रकार से महंगाई दर के बढ़ने और घटने का असर इंटरेस्ट रेट आदि पर पड़ता है.
Views: 8916 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
Should I Invest in Bonds When Interest Rates are Low?
 
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Since interest rates are at all-time lows, does that mean we should sell our bonds? Joe answers this viewer’s question in 60 seconds. Important Points 0:09 "We certainly believe in the asset allocations; we have approximately 40%-50% in bonds. With bonds doing so well over the past thirty years, I'm concerned with the direction of the bonds and [wondering] if perhaps we should put more into other equities" 0:32 "We're in a huge bond bull market because when interest rates go down, bond prices go up. So interest rates are basically at all-time lows" 0:47 "You have to look at bonds a little bit differently; you want to look at bonds to damper the overall volatility of the overall portfolio" 0:55 "Depending on what your time frames, your goals and everything else is, you don't want to look at bonds as an income stream potentially...you want to look at a total return portfolio" 1:09 "You absolutely want to make sure that you have some safety in your overall portfolio. 40% in bonds sounds reasonable; the other 60% in equities you want to make sure that it's globally diversified - when equities go up your bond prices are going to stay straight. When equities go down, your bonds are going to save you" 1:24 "You definitely want to keep bonds in your portfolio even in a low-interest environment" 1:37 "The key I would say is look at a total return, don't look at each individual asset class" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” Channels & show times: yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Who buys negative-yielding bonds? | FT Markets
 
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Read 'Why bond yields are so low' : http://on.ft.com/2e9kOE0 Negative yielding bonds are bonds which have a negative interest rate. It means that when a person buys those bonds, instead of generating profit, they lose money. Why would anyone buy such bonds then? Some institutions are forced legally, others are betting and hope to make money. ► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
Views: 4912 Financial Times
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 362232 Khan Academy
Rising Interest Rates Bad for Bonds - Everything Investments
 
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Interest Rates Bad for Bonds - Everything Investments Sign up for our newsletter today http://eepurl.com/ES-x5 Find out more about this at our website http://www.everythinginvestments.com When interest rates go up, bond prices fall. The reason for this is because income investors looking to loan money out, wonʼt buy a lower rate bond, if they can purchase one today for a higher rate. The opposite is true for when interest rates fall, this causes investors to pay a higher price for bonds issued out with higher rates, so when interest rates fall, bonds rise in value. Lets use an example, lets say the U.S. Treasury is issuing out bonds at 2% today, this means that for every $100 invested, you are receiving $2 per year until the date of maturity. However if rates rise to 4%, your bond could fall in value 50%, why? Because in order for a new investor to receive the same 4% maturity he will get from a new bond issued, he will need to purchase your bond for $50, giving him $2 a year in interest which is 4% return. It is important to understand this only effects bond traders, if you hold any bond to maturity, assuming the borrow doesnʼt default, you will receive your entire principal plus interest. So as long as you hold a bond to maturity, you wonʼt lose money. However this
Understanding Fixed-Floating Bonds
 
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Understanding Fixed-Floating Bonds
Views: 1426 InvestingForMe
Valuation 101: How Interest Rates Impact Bonds
 
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And how do fundamentals like inflation and interest rates factor into the investment value equation? In investing, as in so many other arenas, the questions with the most complex answers tend to start with one word — “why.” In this month's Motley Fool Answers mailbag comes a particularly good “why question" from a listener who’s curious about why we gauge the values of companies and assets with the metrics we do, and why different industries and businesses seem to be held to such different standards. To answer, special guest Buck Hartzell, director of Investor Learning and Operations at The Motley Fool, joins hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp. In this segment, he talks about the relative merits of different industries, and the inescapable relationships between inflation rates, interest rates, and risk and reward in investing. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 355 The Motley Fool
Betting on Long Term Interest Rates: Bonds
 
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Spread betting on bonds http://www.financial-spread-betting.com/Spread-bet-bonds.html Betting on long term interest rates. When spread betting you can usually bet on short term interest rates or long term interest rates which relate to government bond issues. Government bonds are fixed interest securities.
Views: 436 UKspreadbetting
This is how Professional Traders Trade Bonds - Interest Rate Futures trading interest rates
 
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Let me show the Correct Way to Trade Bond Futures Bond Futures LIVE Register HERE http://www.infinityfutures.com/webinarsRose83b.aspx Infinity Futures, Trading Bond Futures, how to trade the yield curve, using /ZN and /ZB Nobs Bubs Fits Fyts... interest rate futures, learn to trade CME Bond Futures bonds interest rates futures contract
Views: 2511 Jonathan Rose
Tariffs, Interest Rates, Bonds: What It All Means for the CEF Space
 
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Joining us for discussion around CEF discounts and opportunities is Eric Boughton, CFA, Portfolio Manager, Chief Analyst - Matisse Capital.
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation (2016)
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 3536 TheFinCoach
Podcast #84- Bonds in a Rising Interest Rate Environment
 
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I was asked for some good strategies for investing in bonds in a rising interest rate environment. Show notes: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/bonds-rising-interest-rates-podcast-84/ These strategies include short term bonds, money market funds, inflation adjusted bonds, and stable value funds. Don’t extrapolate the past into the future. Interest rates may go up, down, or stay flat. Like you, I have no idea what the answer is. Neither does anybody else. Make sure you have an investing plan that is highly likely to reach your goals no matter what happens with interest rates in the short run and in the long run. I prefer a fixed asset allocation strategy. If you had a working crystal ball, stay in cash until rates are done going up, then switch to long term bonds until rates are done going down then switch again. You can hedge your bets by staying short, but there is a very real cost to doing that and we discuss that in this episode. For more thoughts on including bonds in your investment portfolio, try this post: https://www.whitecoatinvestor.com/thoughts-on-bonds-at-the-end-of-2014/ To learn more about how to allocate your assets and reach your financial goals, check out our Fire Your Financial Advisor course: https://whitecoatinvestor.teachable.com/p/fire-your-financial-advisor
Using Bonds & Notes to Predict Interest Rates & Economic Activity | Closing the Gap: Futures Edition
 
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https://www.tastytrade.com/tt/ The difference between the yield on the 10-year notes and 30-year bonds is known as the NOB spread (notes over bonds). The NOB spread is used by many to gauge economic expectations and also the shape of the yield curve. Pete Mulmat from the CME discusses strategies using /ZN and /ZB to trade yield curve assumptions. ======== tastytrade.com ======== Finally a financial network for traders, built by traders. Hosted by Tom Sosnoff and Tony Battista, tastytrade is a real financial network with 8 hours of live programming five days a week during market hours. From pop culture to advanced investment strategies, tastytrade has a broad spectrum of content for viewers of all kinds! Tune in and learn how to trade options successfully and make the most of your investments! Plus, access our visual trading platform, dough, to learn the basics of options trading and manage your portfolio! With hours of tutorial videos and unique tools on a simple, easy-to-use trading interface, dough.com is here to make learning how to trade options fun! Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://goo.gl/s2bAxF Watch tastytrade LIVE daily Monday-Friday 7am-3:15pmCT: https://goo.gl/OTv3Ez Follow tastytrade: Twitter: https://twitter.com/tastytrade Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tastytrade LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/tastytrade Instagram: http://instagram.com/tastytrade Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/tastytrade/
Views: 3408 tastytrade
BONDS, BOND YIELD, INTEREST RATES,  INFLATION AND QUANTITATIVE EASING (HINDI)
 
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THIS IS THE VIDEO IN ECONOMIC DICTIONARY WHICH SHORTLY COVERS TOPICS LIKE BOND, BOND YIELD, INTEREST RATES, INFLATION, DEFLATION AND QUANTITATIVE EASING IN HINDI. DONATION LINKS PAYTM: 9179370707 BHIM: 9179370707 INSTAMOJO: https://www.instamojo.com/@idealcoaching
Views: 381 Ideal Coaching
Bonds & FX
 
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FX traders want to own currencies of countries where interest rates are heading higher. Understand why keeping a close and constant watch on the bond market matters.
Views: 1434 Bloomberg
Bonds Explained for Beginners | Bond Trading 101
 
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Earn up to 1 Year Free: https://bit.ly/2oul70h Free Resources: https://bit.ly/2wymZbJ A bond is a type of loan issued to some type of entity such as a business or government by an investor. It’s similar to borrowing money from a lender if you’ve ever purchased a home or car before. Sometimes businesses need more money than the banks will offer them, so they issue bonds as a way to raise more capital. Governments can also issue bonds when they need more money for things like roads or parks. Bonds are considered safer on the risk spectrum for investments, but they also typically carry a lower return. Benjamin Graham, author of the intelligent investor and Warren Buffets mentor, recommends holding a portfolio of 75% stocks and 25% bonds during a bull market and 75% bonds and 25% stocks during a bear market. As opposed to other investments which are considered equity, bonds are considered debt which means that if a company goes under, it must repay all bondholders before stockholders. This is due to the fixed interest nature of the bond. When the investor purchases a bond at what’s called the face value, they are paid interest, known as the coupon or yield. The reason it’s referred to as coupon is because back when bonds were actually paper, investors would physically have to clip coupons to redeem their interest. Anyway, the investor is paid a coupon on the bond until the loan is fully paid back by the issuer. This is known as the maturity date. Interest payment frequency and the maturity date is determined prior to the purchase of the bond. For example, if I purchase a $1,000, 3-year bond with a 5% coupon, I know I’ll receive $50 in interest each year for 3 years. Now it’s important to note that Bonds can vary in risk and return A AAA bond is the best bond you can buy while a Ba bond and lower are more speculative and are known as Junk bonds When it comes to bonds, the higher the return, the higher the risk. The lower the return, the lower the risk. Bonds with a longer maturity date are also riskier and carry a higher return. Typically government bonds will be safer than corporate bonds. When it comes to taxation, corporate bonds are taxed regularly while some bonds like municipal and other government bonds are tax-exempt. A bond can also be secured or unsecured With an unsecured bond, you may lose all of your investment if the company fails while with a secured bond, the company pledges specific assets to give shareholders if they fail to repay their bonds. Although bonds are considered a “safer” investment, they still do come with risks. When you purchase a bond, interest rates are out of your control and may fluctuate. Interest rates are controlled by the U.S. treasury, the federal reserve, and the banking industry. This means that if specified in your agreement, the company may be able to issue a call provision which is an early redemption of the bond. While not always the case, companies will take advantage of lower interest rates to pay back loans early. This leaves you with a lower return than what you expected. Bonds are also inversely proportional to interest rates so when interest rates go up, bonds go down and vice versa. Bonds can also be traded between investors prior to its maturity date. A bond that’s traded below the market value is said to be trading at a discount while a bond trading for more than it’s face value is trading at a premium. Bonds can be a great way to diversify your investment portfolio, however, they can also be quite complex. You can use investment platforms like Fidelity, E-Tade, or Charles Shwabb to learn more about specific types of bonds. For today’s video, we will be using Fidelity. Social Links: Website: http://www.wharmstrong.com Twitter: http://bit.ly/2DBEhdz Facebook: http://bit.ly/2F5uB8a Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wharmstrong1/ Disclaimer: Nothing published on my channel should be considered personal investment advice. Although I do discuss various types of investments and strategies, I am not a licensed professional. Please invest responsibly. This post contains affiliate links
Views: 2251 Will Armstrong
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
High Yield Bonds and Rising Rates: Opportunity or Risk?
 
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Shawna Millman, Vice President and Director, TD Asset Management, shares her analysis on the high yield bond market and the impact of rising rates.
Views: 1133 TD
Treasury Bonds, Interest Rates, The Dollar, and Stock Market
 
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This video describes the recent Treasury Bubble, and explains why that bubble will soon burst.
Views: 4625 Stock Traders Daily
'Bonds are the new bonds': CNBC's Santoli on tipping point for interest rates
 
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CNBC's Mike Santoli reports on the tipping point for interest rates. He said that there is no key yield threshold and that having a balanced portfolio is best.
Views: 371 CNBC Television
Global Bonds Will Suffer Biggest Crash IN HISTORY! If Rates Go Higher, Collapse Will be TRIGGERED!
 
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LOOK THROUGH MY BOOKS!: http://books.themoneygps.com SUPPORT MY WORK: https://www.patreon.com/themoneygps PAYPAL: https://goo.gl/L6VQg9 BITCOIN: 1MbAUXsHa8XRFMHjGurd7L5nRDYJYMQQmq ETHEREUM: 0xece0Dd6D0b4617A8D94cff634C64155bb1cD8C2C LITECOIN: LWh6fji4WrJT7FAbFvFSZ9jVNCgVM3dHod DASH: Xj9RXrvhXbaL3prMDvdzAxM8gDB2vDiZrh MONERO:47q5qDPkDBLRadwcSXDsri3PNniYRYY1HYAhidXWAg8xXHFFZHFi7i9GwwmZN9J5CJd8exT4WARpg2asCzkuoTmd3dfcXr6 ******************************************************************** STEEMIT: https://steemit.com/@themoneygps DTUBE: https://dtube.video/c/themoneygps VIDME: https://vid.me/themoneygps T-SHIRTS: http://themoneygps.com/store ******************************************************************** Sources Used in This Video: https://goo.gl/UpprQe
Views: 9759 The Money GPS
Bonds | YTM | INTEREST RATES | COUPON | YIELD | HINDI
 
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This video will help in understanding various topics like Bonds, Interest rates, YTM, Coupon Rate, Maturity, Yields, Relation of Interest rates with Bond Price
Views: 251 GeekDonkey
Interest Rates on Discount Bonds
 
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I show how the bond price and the interest rate are inversely related.
Views: 8828 Mike Fladlien
Minyanville Webcast Series: Bonds, Interest Rates & Fixed Income Investing
 
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Kevin Ferry and Vince Foster discuss Bonds, Interest Rates & Fixed Income Investing. Take a risk-free, 14-day Buzz & Banter trial to see why they've been Buzzing for years. http://mvp.minyanville.com/buzz-banter-step-2-youtube/ About the presenters: Kevin Ferry has been a CTA pool operator and advisor since 2007. He has over 25 years of experience as an interest rate specialist at the CME and is also a contributor to the Contrarian Corner blog. Vince Foster is a capital markets veteran with over 15 years of experience covering multiple asset classes. He is currently an interest rate strategist and portfolio manager for a commercial bank.
[Economy Lecture] L2/P2: Inflation Indexed Bonds (IIB), Nominal vs Real Interest rates
 
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1. What is the difference between nominal interest rate vs real interest rate? 2. Why do people invest in gold and real-estate during inflation? 3. Why is excessive gold-consumption bad for Indian economy? How to prevent it? 4. Differences between IIB an IINSS-C 5. Computation mechanism for interest paid on IIB, how is it linked with inflation? 6. Why are inflation indexed bonds (IIB) losing their sheen in 2015? Powerpoint available at http://Mrunal.org/download Venue: Sardar Patel Institute of Public Administration (SPIPA), Satellite, Ahmedabad, Gujarat,India Exam-Utility: UPSC CSAT, CDS, CAPF, SSC, IBPS, Banking, MBA interview
Views: 291974 Mrunal Patel
How to Invest in Bonds & Debentures in 2018? - Hindi
 
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Let us learn how to invest in Bonds and Debentures in hindi. You can invest in Corporate Bonds or Debentures, Government Bonds or Tax Saving Bonds of Public Sector Units (PSU). There are 2 main ways - (1) Through Debt Mutual Funds and (2) Directly. In this video, we will understand all avenues through which you can invest in Bonds and Debentures and what kind of returns you can expect. You can choose to invest in corporate debentures, government securities or tax saving bonds like REC Bonds, NHAI Bonds and PFC Bonds. Related Videos: Bonds vs Debentures: https://youtu.be/BdMg5RmMj_0 Shares vs Bonds/Debentures: https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Types of Bonds and Debentures: https://youtu.be/5YN_Uo7stms हिंदी में जानें कि bonds और debentures में invest कैसे करें। आप Public Sector Units (PSU) के Corporate Bonds or Debentures, Government Bonds or Tax Saving Bonds में Invest कर सकते हैं। 2 main तरीके हैं - (1) Debt Mutual Funds के माध्यम से और (2) Directly। इस वीडियो में, हम उन सभी avenues को समझेंगे जिनके माध्यम से आप Bonds और Debentures में invest कर सकते हैं और आप किस तरह के returns की उम्मीद कर सकते हैं। Share this video: https://youtu.be/hC9OsIzAoEk Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Finance Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g To access more learning resources on finance, check out www.assetyogi.com In this video, we have explained: How to invest in bonds and debentures? How to invest in debt mutual funds to get exposure to bonds and debentures indirectly? How to buy government bonds? What kind of returns you can expect in different types of bonds? What are the avenues through which we can invest in debentures? What do tax saving bonds mean? What are the main methods to invest in bonds and debentures? What is the indirect way of investing? How to invest in tax-saving bonds? What are the advantages and disadvantage in an indirect way of investing i.e. through debt mutual funds and hybrid mutual funds? What is the direct way of investing? Are government bonds traded on the stock market? Why the interest rates on tax-saving bonds is less? How to invest in corporate bonds? What does buyback facility mean? Make sure to like and share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “How to invest in Bonds and Debentures"
Views: 7268 Asset Yogi
How do mortgage bonds affect interest rates
 
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David Luecke of Capitol Homes discusses mortgage bonds and how they affect interest rates on the Money Man Mike Show.
Views: 28 Capitol Homes, Inc
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 35556 TheFinCoach