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How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
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Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 286119 David Taylor
The psychology of self-motivation | Scott Geller | TEDxVirginiaTech
 
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Never miss a talk! SUBSCRIBE to the TEDx channel: http://bit.ly/1FAg8hB Scott Geller is Alumni Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech and Director of the Center for Applied Behavior Systems in the Department of Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, and the World Academy of Productivity and Quality. He has written numerous articles and books, including When No One's Watching: Living and Leading Self-motivation. Scott will examine how we can become self-motivated in "The Psychology of Self-Motivation." In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 7065104 TEDx Talks
32 Psychological Tips to Read People's Mind
 
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Sometimes we do something weird and then think, ‘What was the logic of my behavior?’ Was it there? In fact, there’s always some logic, but most often it hides in certain peculiarities of your mind. The human psyche is a pro at hiding its own secrets. Scientists have been working for years to understand everything about the mind and brain, yet there’s still so much left to find out. But you don't necessarily have to be an expert in psychology to understand what's going on in other people's heads and use it to your advantage. There are some psychological tips that work on a subconscious level that help you win another person's trust, get somebody's approval, and relax when you’re stressed out. Watch the video till the end to understand why we always want something that is impossible to achieve and why we act one way or another! TIMESTAMPS: Who people look at when they're laughing 1:04 Constant changing of your memories 2:09 How to get any information you need 4:42 Clustering illusion 7:15 The secret of a small mirror 8:29 The Kuleshov Effect 11:28 How much time you spend in La-la Land 12:11 "Body Negative" 13:52 What 3 things you can't NOT notice 14:10 Survivorship Bias 15:30 Hard-to-Reach Effect 17:32 The Fear of Beauty 19:30 #psychologicaltricks # Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY: - After a good joke or in the middle of an interesting discussion, every person instinctively looks at the person they like the most. This is because they want to make sure that the object of their desires approves of and shares their sense of humor. - People often imagine their memories like short films or video clips. You store them somewhere in the attic of your brain, and they stay there collecting dust and never changing. But this isn't exactly true. - If you don't like the answer someone has given you, or it seems like they’re not telling you the whole story, just keep staring at them. - If you have to talk to a lot of people at work, hang a small mirror behind your desk. You’ll be surprised that many people will be more polite and ready to meet you halfway in negotiations. This is because nobody likes to see themselves angry or annoyed. - The effect when a viewer, after seeing two unrelated frames, unconsciously makes up a logical connection between them is called the Kuleshov effect. - Scientists from the University of California are saying that every single day people spend 30% of their time in La-la Land. - "Body negative" is a condition where a person thinks they’re ugly, and this is why their personal life is a fail. And their whole life is a fail. Most often such people are attractive, and the problem is more about self-esteem than real flaws. - You can't NOT notice 3 things: food, sex, and danger - Most often we judge a situation only by successful people ("survivors"), and that’s why we know just one side of it. - Roughly speaking, this is the phenomenon telling that the hard-to-reach is always more desirable. Even if we look at it from a human level: closed, high-status, "no-one-knows-what’s-on-their-mind" people always seem more attractive than others. - Some people feel excessive tension next to beautiful people: excitement, double control of one’s actions, the desire to save face, and fear of comparison. Such stress doesn’t arise next to an average person. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 520884 BRIGHT SIDE
10 Psychological Effects That Affect Your Behavior
 
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How to make people like you? How to understand people and your own behavior? Sometimes we do something weird and then think, ‘What was the logic of my behavior?’ In fact, there’s always some logic, but most often it hides in certain peculiarities of your mind. We’re going to tell you about ten psychological effects that affect you almost every day. TIMESTAMPS The Anchoring Effect 0:41 Deflection to the Result 1:10 The Paradox of Choice 1:39 Clustering Illusion 2:07 Pratfall Effect 2:29 The Kuleshov Effect 2:53 "Body Negative" 3:42 Survivorship Bias 4:02 Hard-to-Reach Effect 4:28 The Fear of Beauty 4:51 SUMMARY - People feel it much easier to evaluate something if they have the original price (even if it’s wrong) as a kind of anchor. - We often judge the correctness of a decision by the final result, not by the actions taken to achieve it. This effect is often used by those ads which concentrate you only on the final result (for example, on buying).  - The paradox of choice says that the more options there are, the less the possibility we’ll be happy with our final choice.  - Clustering Illusioт is characterized by the tendency to see a certain system in random coincidences. This especially applies to gamblers and lovers of fate signs. - Perfection is repulsive, and mistakes are attractive — they make us more human. That’s why you shouldn’t get too upset having stumbled in front of anyone.  - The effect when a viewer, after seeing two unrelated frames, unconsciously makes up a logical connection between them is called the Kuleshov effect. - "Body negative" is a condition where a person thinks they’re ugly, and this is why their personal life is a fail. And their whole life is a fail. - Most often we judge a situation only by successful people ("survivors"), and that’s why we know just one side of it. For example, we envy a businessperson who got rich selling Bengal lights, but we don’t know how many businesspeople failed with them.  - Even if we look at it from a human level: closed, high-status, "no-one-knows-what’s-on-their-mind" people always seem more attractive than others. - Some people feel excessive tension next to beautiful people: excitement, double control of one’s actions, the desire to save face, and fear of comparison. Such stress doesn’t arise next to an average person. Do you know any interesting psychological tricks that help in communicating with anyone? Share them in the comments! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1506865 BRIGHT SIDE
LOOT BOXES = GAMBLING! (Psychological Study Results)
 
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An Australian study has found that Loot Boxes in Video Games are psychologically akined to gambling. In this video I discuss this study and what it could mean for video games that contain loot boxes such as call of duty and overwatch just to name a few. Let me know your thoughts, drop a like if you enjoyed, and subscribe for more black ops 4 tips and tricks, news, and more ❤️Subscribe on YouTube http://goo.gl/TtnxFN Join my Notification Squad: click the 🔔Bell https://www.pcgamer.com/loot-boxes-are-psychologically-akin-to-gambling-according-to-australian-study/ https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2018-04-25-now-belgium-declares-loot-boxes-gambling-and-therefore-illegal https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/2/15517962/china-new-law-dota-league-of-legends-odds-loot-box-random ●Black Ops 4: NEW Clans & Teams Feature +"Running The Gauntlet" EVENTS! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1mdTN0BfE8& ●Blackout Battle Royale = The FUTURE of Gaming! (Blackout BETA Week 1 Review) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofyAdov_NSI ●Blackout Battle Royale: HUGE eSports Event w/ Ninja & Shroud + More Updates! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNJErkWaqZ0 ⚔️ Check out more Black Ops 4 News, Tips, and Guides below ⚔️ 🔶 Stay Connected! ● Twitter - https://twitter.com/MrTheRevertz ●Twitch.Tv - https://www.twitch.tv/mrtherevertz_ ● 2nd Channel - goo.gl/c8N7LA ● PSN ID: MrTheRevertz ● Gamebattles http://profile.majorleaguegaming.com/MrTheRevertz/ ● UMG: http://www.umggaming.com/mrtherevertz 🔷Black Ops 4: Specialist Guides: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V47U_-v4oYo&list=PLgGZuG6ZdsPn8TqqYkzOVvo12yqRAkrto 🔷Black Ops 4: Tips & Tricks: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgGZuG6ZdsPl6ciMl8IJxnpm26jkkQNiT&disable_polymer=true 🔷Black Ops 4 Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgGZuG6ZdsPlJOPDbyNM6YJs3d5QOHybG 🔸Call Of Duty WWII: Tips & Tricks: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgGZuG6ZdsPmE82cVRwLUz8WSnVRMKU9R 🔸Call Of Duty: WWII Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgGZuG6ZdsPlkbR2mvqOMwkSRCiJHP9E8
Views: 71 MrTheRevertz
20+ Psychology Tricks to Read Anyone Like a Book
 
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We get over 55% of information through nonverbal communication, like facial expressions, gestures, and other body movements. Pay attention to the signals that other people send without even realizing it. You’ve probably wondered how convenient life would be if you could read other people's minds. Some people use their intuition for this, but if you’re not so perceptive, there’s only one choice left: learning to read people's body language. TIMESTAMPS Closing their eyes 0:45 Covering their mouth 1:00 Chewing on their glasses 1:26 “Presenting” their face 1:52 Rubbing their chin 2:16 Crossed arms 2:34 Fixing their posture 3:02 Leaning forward 3:22 Leaning back 3:50 Swinging from their heels to their toes 4:14 Rubbing their hands 4:37 The "glove" handshake 4:59 A handshake with the palm facing the floor vs ceiling 5:29 Cupping someone’s hands during a handshake 5:57 A handshake with a touch 6:25 Fixing their tie 7:09 Collecting imaginary lint 7:30 Putting their feet on the desk 7:50 Mounting a chair like a horse 8:11 Playing with their shoe 8:35 Eye contact 8:57 Avoiding eye contact 9:34 Unbroken staring 9:50 A lot of blinking 10:16 SUMMARY - If a person is talking to you and closing their eyes, you should know that they’re trying to hide from the outside world. - A few fingers, a palm, or even a fist near the mouth helps us hold back the words we don't want to let out. - If you see someone chewing on the earpieces of their glasses, try having a heart-to-heart with them and cheering them up. They’re definitely subconsciously worried about something. - Crossed arms are a clear sign that a person is not feeling it today. - When a woman wants a man to notice her, she tries to present herself in the best way possible. She straightens her back to emphasize her breasts, and she may also cross her legs. - When people like someone and want to get to know them, they usually lean forward. - If someone sits back in their chair, they’re showing that they’re tired of the conversation and don't want to keep it going. - If a person doesn't swing back and forth but bounces up and down on their toes, it might be a sign that they’re feeling confident. - Rubbing the hands together generally means that a person has a positive feeling about something, and they’re hopeful. - While you’re shaking hands with someone, if that person takes your wrist with their free hand, they’re showing that they’re trustworthy, friendly, and honest. What psychological approaches do you use to read others? Share your secrets in the comments below. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 9289625 BRIGHT SIDE
How Restaurants Use Psychology to Make You Spend More Money
 
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Restaurants have a whole bucket-load of tricks up their sleeves to get you to spend more money. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, Inerri, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Bella Nash, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.nutr.24.012003.132140 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900704001510 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13411-015-0046-9 http://scholarship.sha.cornell.edu/chrpubs/169/ http://www.le.ac.uk/press/ebulletin/news/havingtherighttaste.html http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-459X.2009.00267.x/abstract http://www.acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?Id=8588 http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/662615 https://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/discoveries/color-your-plates-matters http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.2466/pms.2002.94.2.671 https://academic.oup.com/jcr/article-abstract/30/3/455/1790637/Bottoms-Up-The-Influence-of-Elongation-on-Pouring http://www.mdpi.com/2306-5710/3/3/33/htm http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329314001542 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0043007 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329315000907 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13411-017-0052-1 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329317301192 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-1-12 https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-1-7 https://cpl.revues.org/398 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0013916506295574 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329311000966 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-459X.2011.00351.x/full https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-4 https://www.psy.ox.ac.uk/publications/322876 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/oby.2005.12/full Images: https://flavourjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2044-7248-3-7
Views: 1213607 SciShow Psych
10 Psychology Tricks That Work ON ANYBODY
 
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10 Mind Game Tricks You Can Do On Your Friends. 10 Edible Makeup Ideas / 10 Funny Pranks https://youtu.be/UiOkZ-DAGTE Jake Paul's Team 10 Members Reimagined As Cartoon Characters https://youtu.be/-uFZyx70_n8 Subscribe: https://goo.gl/Hnoaw3 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The human brain is a powerful organ, but not so powerful that you can’t easily manipulate the minds of others. By using these sneaky tricks, you can fool people into doing exactly what you want them to do, without them even knowing what’s going on! From defusing a sticky situation in the boardroom to catching a stalker, these are 10 psychology tricks that work on anybody. If you ever find yourself in a sticky situation with a colleague at work, use this easy method. When you think someone is going to talk bad about you, or get aggressive with you at a meeting, just sit next to them. People are less likely to get aggressive with someone who is nearby. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheTalko Twitter: https://twitter.com/thetalko Instagram: https://instagram.com/the_talko ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.thetalko.com/
Views: 14379986 TheTalko
Peer Review in 3 Minutes
 
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How do articles get peer reviewed? What role does peer review play in scholarly research and publication? This video will explain. This video is published under a Creative Commons 3.0 BY-NC-SA US license. License, credits, and contact information can be found here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/peerreview/ Feel free to link to / embed our videos!
Views: 239092 libncsu
How to write a Psychology Personal Statement (Oxford, Bangor, Greenwich and Sussex University)
 
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Admissions tutors give their advice on how to write a great Psychology Personal Statement. READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=26328-How-to-write-an-excellent-personal-statement-in-10-steps
Views: 10891 thestudentroom
26 PSYCHOLOGY FACTS YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT PEOPLE
 
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Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz For copyright matters please contact us at: [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Learning something new about yourself is always interesting and entertaining. And understanding the psychology behind the way we behave, treat others, and express ourselves can be even more appealing. Today, we here at Bright Side have compiled a list of the most surprising psychology facts that can help you better understand yourself and others. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2493745 BRIGHT SIDE
Study Shows People Who Post Gym Selfies Have Psychological Problems
 
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Study Shows People Who Post Gym Selfies Have Psychological Problems ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Read the article you can access the source: fitnessandpower.com ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The channel owners like to thank the site source of this valuable information and wish all viewers their support in every way If you believe that there is something contrary to the rights of authorship and publication, send us a message on Youtube messages and comment below the video and we will contact you because we do not want to be exposed to your rights and we do not mean policy violations and we are in advance happy with you ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Summer Day Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ARTICLE CREDITS: **DISCLAIMER** The materials and the information contained on articles Health Life channel are provided for general and educational purposes only and do not constitute any legal, medical or other professional advice on any subject matter. None of the information on our videos is a substitute for a diagnosis and treatment by your health professional. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers prior to starting any new diet or treatment and with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem, promptly contact your health care, provider. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted. "Fair Use" guidelines: www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17/107
Why an Entire Field of Psychology Is in Trouble
 
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Learn why an entire field of Psychology is in trouble. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Coda Buchanan, Lucy McGlasson, Accalia Elementia, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Saul, Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Christopher Collins, Thomas J., charles george, Andreas Heydeck, Patrick D. Ashmore, Justin Lentz, Will and Sonja Marple, Ed Shelley, Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Philippe von Bergen, Fatima Iqbal. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://faculty.washington.edu/jdb/345/345%20Articles/Baumeister%20et%20al.%20(1998).pdf http://www.simplypsychology.org/psyche.html https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/willpower-limited-resource.pdf http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/cover_story/2016/03/ego_depletion_an_influential_theory_in_psychology_may_have_just_been_debunked.html http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20876879?dopt=Abstract https://static1.squarespace.com/static/550b09eae4b0147d03eda40d/t/5525fa8de4b0788926c389cb/1428552333890/running-on-empty.pdf http://www.slate.com/articles/business/productivity/2014/10/decision_fatigue_ego_depletion_how_to_make_better_decisions.html http://www.uky.edu/~njdewa2/gailliotetal07JPSP.pdf http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/04/the-chocolate-and-radish-experiment-that-birthed-the-modern-conception-of-willpower/255544/ http://www.psychologicalscience.org/redesign/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Sripada-Kessler-Jonides-Commentary_final2-002.pdf http://www.psychologicalscience.org/redesign/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/RRR-comment-BaumeisterVohs-revised-March17-002.pdf http://www.vox.com/2016/3/22/11284528/explain-replication-crisis-psychology http://www.psy.miami.edu/ehblab/PubBiasSelfControlEgo.pdf
Views: 2104860 SciShow
15 Psychological Tricks That Rule Your Life
 
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Who is the main choice-maker and action-taker in your life? You? And is there anyone or anything affecting your decisions? No one? Are you sure? When we say our actions are a result of only our own decisions, we lie a bit. In fact, your brain is constantly tricking you, impairing your perception of reality. Bright Side gathered 15 psychological effects that override our behavior and leave us none the wiser. Do you know, for example, what the boiling syndrome is? It's named after a real experiment involving a frog in boiling water, hence the name. If you place a frog into a pot with water of a comfortable temperature and start heating it slowly, the frog will exhaust itself trying to stabilize its body temperature and won’t be able to jump out when the water’s boiling. If, however, you place it in boiling water, it’ll jump out right away. It works the same with humans. When we find ourselves in an annoying situation, we prefer to suffer little inconveniences until they drain us to the limit. Difficult relationships and joyless work are both traps we herd ourselves into because we are so reluctant to change things. TIMESTAMPS: The “Boiling Frog” Syndrome 1:07 Conservative Thinking 1:52 The Ostrich Effect 2:27 The Blind Spot Effect 3:00 Availability Heuristic 3:49 The Dunning-Kruger Effect 4:15 Zero-Risk Preference 4:40 The Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon 5:07 Audience Effect 5:46 The Halo Effect 6:26 Decoy Theory 7:15 The IKEA Effect 7:36 The “Crab Bucket” Effect 8:04 The Dr. Fox Effect 8:39 Emotional Anticipation 9:06 #psychologicaltricks #psychologicaleffects #boilingsyndrome Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - Your brain tends to cling to old beliefs and neglect new and verified data. Here’s a good example: For centuries, people believed Earth was flat. It was just more comfortable to think about it like that! - You ignore information that upsets you, preferring not to think about the problem. Perhaps you’re glad the teacher hasn’t checked the exam papers yet because you don’t want to know the result. - This may sound paradoxical, but the inability to see cognitive biases in ourselves is also a bias. The blind spot effect is all about that. People tend to see someone else’s behavioral issues while being blind to their own faults — even the most obvious ones. - We often overrate the value of available information, especially when making decisions. For instance, a person defending their bad habit would say they know someone who smoked 3 packs of cigarettes a day and lived to be 100. - When we get the hang of something new, our idea of our talent becomes biased, resulting in inflated self-esteem. That’s why newbies give advice they consider valuable to more experienced colleagues and don’t notice their own mistakes. - A study by Howard Kunreuther, a professor at the Wharton School, showed that if you give people the choice of either reducing a small risk to zero or dramatically cutting a huge one, the majority choose the former — even if it’s counterproductive. - Have you ever noticed how you learn a new word or concept and it starts haunting you? In reality, your brain is merely excited since you’ve learned something new, and you start subconsciously looking for it everywhere. - People perform much better in the presence of their colleagues, clients, or any other audience. However, it only relates to simpler tasks that they’re very familiar with. Performing new and more complicated tasks tends to be harder with a passive audience. - We usually deem beautiful and talented celebrities to be good people without knowing them personally. Supervisors often judge employees by just one positive or negative characteristic, which affects the big picture. - The decoy theory is used by smart marketing professionals. When they want you to buy the more expensive of 2 products in the same range, they’ll position a third product that’s overpriced right next to them. - The more effort you put into something, the more you love and value it. - People subconsciously don’t want anyone around them to change their life for the better because they themselves will look worse by comparison. - Most people trust the words of an eloquent speaker, often failing to notice breaches in logic or even false information. At the same time, the words of more competent but less convincing people seem less important - The more you wait for something, the more excited you feel about it in advance, and the less happy you are when the wait is finally over. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 78684 BRIGHT SIDE
Reading Music to Concentrate | Ambient Study Music | Atmospheric Music for Studying, Concentration
 
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3 Hours of some of the best ambient study music and reading music to concentrate. Relaxing atmospheric music for studying, concentration and focus memory for work: soothing music for reading. Use it as background study music for final exam study time and studying music to concentrate on homework, learning, working, reading or writing. Enjoy this beautiful calming music! Thank you so much for watching this video by Just Instrumental Music channel. I hope you enjoy it and don't forget to Subscribe :) Music: "I am a man who will fight for your honor" by Chris Zabriskie (chriszabriskie.com) (CC BY 4.0)
Views: 2222761 Just Instrumental Music
APA Style Journal Article Reporting Standards
 
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As part of its promotion of greater transparency and the assessment of rigor in psychological science, the American Psychological Association has released new Journal Article Reporting Standards for researchers seeking to publish in scholarly journals. The standards are specific to psychological research and offer guidelines on the information needed in a research article to ensure that the elements included are comprehensible and that the study can be replicated. The new standards: - Recommend the division of hypotheses, analyses and conclusions into primary, secondary and exploratory groupings to allow for a full understanding of quantitative analyses presented in a manuscript and enhance reproducibility. - Offer modules for authors reporting on N-of-1 design, replication, clinical trials, longitudinal studies and observational studies, as well as the analytic methods structural equation modeling and Bayesian analysis. - Address the plurality of inquiry traditions, methods and goals, providing guidance on material to include across diverse qualitative research methods. - Provide standards for reporting research using mixed-method designs, drawing on both qualitative and quantitative standards. For more information: “Journal Article Reporting Standards for Quantitative Research in Psychology: The APA Publications and Communications Board Task Force Report” - http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-amp0000151.pdf “Journal Article Reporting Standards for Qualitative Primary, Qualitative Meta-Analytic, and Mixed Methods Research in Psychology: The APA Publications and Communications Board Task Force Report” - http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-amp0000151.pdf "Editorial: Journal Article Reporting Standards” - http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/amp-amp0000263.pdf __ The American Psychological Association is the leading scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States, with more than 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students as its members. To learn more about the APA visit http://www.apa.org Follow APA on social media: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AmericanPsychologicalAssociation/ Twitter https://twitter.com/apa LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/10738/ Google+ https://plus.google.com/+americanpsychologicalassociation
Do you trust psychology? The Rosenhan Experiment
 
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The battle of Sane vs. Insane. The Rosenhan experiment was a famous experiment done in order to determine the validity of psychiatric diagnosis, conducted by psychologist David Rosenhan, a Stanford University professor, and published by the journal Science in 1973 under the title "On being sane in insane places". Despite the provocative title, which is designed to initiate date, Lifelong Learners would like to acknowledge the huge amount of value provided by expert psychologists. Do you have positive or negative experiences with psychologists? Post below. My equipment: Hardware (1) Microphone: http://amzn.to/2wRW60p (2) Phone Recording: http://amzn.to/2htNLuh (3) DSLR Recording: http://amzn.to/2xF17h4 (4) Laptop: http://amzn.to/2hsHI9x Software: (1) Visual/ Animation software: (a) Videoscribe, (b) Adobe Premiere Pro, (c) Powtoon. (2) Audio: Audacity (3) Thumbnails: Powerpoint To learn more see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6bmZ8cVB4oTo see more information http://psychrights.org/articles/Rosenham.htm Check out other great content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KScrHGrbaxs
Views: 3274 Lifelong Learners
11 Secrets to Memorize Things Quicker Than Others
 
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We learn things throughout our entire lives, but we still don’t know everything because we forget a lot of information. Bright Side will tell you about 11 simple memorizing tips that will help you remember everything and improve your memory. TIMESTAMPS Why we forget things 1:04 How to remember everything 2:00 How to memorize something quickly 2:30 How to memorize something for a long time 3:20 Try to understand what you learn 4:17 Learn the most necessary information 5:11 Serial position effect 5:45 Interference theory 6:06 Learn opposite things 7:22 Build your own «mind palace» 7:22 Use «nail words» 8:19 Make up stories 8:40 Use a tape recorder 9:10 Visualize 9:51 Choose only the best materials 9:59 SUMMARY - Your brain is like a hard drive — the space is limited. Remember Sherlock Holmes? He couldn’t name all the planets of the Solar system — this was not because he missed school or something like that, but because he was too smart to have such irrelevant information in his memory. He deliberately erased facts he would never need. This is what your brain does: it protects you from overloading with information. That’s why all new data is stored in the short-term memory, not the long-term one. So, if you don’t repeat it or use it, you forget it very quickly. A German psychologist, Hermann Ebbinghaus researched the memory and its mechanisms. He described the Forgetting Curve which shows that just one hour after learning something new we forget more than half of the learned information. One day later we remember only about 30% percent. Well, you see where this is going. - There is a memorization technique called «Spaced repetition». To keep some information in your head for a longer time, you need to try to put it into your long-term memory. Forced memorization is not very effective in this case because your brain can’t make sense of the information quickly and form strong associations. Here it all depends on the reason why you are learning something. - To memorize something quickly, repeat the information right after learning it. The second repetition should be after 15-20 minutes. You don’t need to return to the information between repetitions — just rest and do something different. Let your brain relax. Repeat the learned material the third time after 6-8 hours. And you should have the final repetition 24 hours after the first contact with the information. Do you know any other memorizing tips? If yes, share them in the comment section below! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 8880249 BRIGHT SIDE
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 13753298 LastWeekTonight
How to Write the Academic Critique Assignment--Critique of Academic Journal Article
 
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Review of a model APA paper for the critique and presentation assignment of PSYC 334, Summer 2014.
Views: 89747 David Taylor
12 Smart Psychological Tips You'd Better Learn
 
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How to make people like you? Bright Side is sharing 12 tips that will work every time and can help you out in any situation and help you win another person's trust. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 4181614 BRIGHT SIDE
13 Study Tips: The Science of Studying Smart
 
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Our brain can potentially memorize 2.5 petabytes of information, which is roughly the equivalent of 3 million hours of YouTube videos. In order to use some of that staggering capacity a little more effectively when you study, here are some tips that are based on widely accepted research by neuroscientists and learning experts. Support our channel at http://www.patreon.com/sprouts Books: - The Mind within the Net: Models of Learning, Thinking, and Acting, by Manfred Spitzer (http://a.co/5zaSMdF) - How we Learn, by Benedict Carey (http://a.co/aOJM4BW) - A Mind For Numbers, by Barbara Oakley, (http://a.co/7T1Gur4) Sources: Brain Capacity https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-is-the-memory-capacity/ Spaced Repetition http://science.sciencemag.org/content/344/6188/1173.full http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/while-you-were-sleeping-synapses-forged-amyloid-purged https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition#Research_and_applications Find your own Style http://www.br-online.de/jugend/izi/english/publication/televizion/25_2012_E/huether_learning.pdf Good Night Sleep http://www.mcgill.ca/channels/news/give-it-time-and-sleep-25022 Spaced Repetition https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition#Research_and_applications Pomodoro https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomodoro_Technique Hard Stuff first https://staciechoice1010.wordpress.com/category/learning-solutions-in-action/ Expertise, Meditate, Converse https://www.ted.com/talks/sandrine_thuret_you_can_grow_new_brain_cells_here_s_how https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3004979/ Go Places https://www.tamu.edu/faculty/stevesmith/SmithMemory/SmithSageChapter.pdf Take Fun Seriously https://www.edutopia.org/blog/neuroscience-behind-stress-and-learning-judy-willis Space Your Studies http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/users/shkim/Bahrick%20et%20al.%20(1993)%20spacing%20effect.pdf 70% Recite vs 30% Memorizse https://archive.org/details/recitationasfact00gaterich Instant Self-Test http://learninglab.psych.purdue.edu/downloads/2006_Roediger_Karpicke_PsychSci.pdf
Views: 3303658 Sprouts
Psychological Advantages of Morning Routines
 
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We’ve head it time and time again: Morning routines are very important. Whether it’s our parents telling us how crucial a hearty breakfast is, or various online articles that talk about “the best morning routines,” the notion that efficiency is crucial when we start our day is a much echoed one. But the real question is whether or not there is actually any science behind these claims. What is happening to our brains when we first wake up? How does that effect our morning routines? Original Article: https://www.psych2go.net/psychology-morning-routines-entrepreneurs/ Script: Lazolia Buzuzi Voice Over: Jim Monteforte Animation: Joleen Oltmanns Feedback Editor: Risha Maes Project Manager: Erin Bogo Producer: Psych2Go More Psych2Go here: http://youtube.com/psych2go Website: http://psych2go.net Twitter: http://twitter.com/psych2go Facebook: http://facebook.com/psych2go Tumblr: http://psych2go.me Feel free to reupload our video but please credit us! :)
Views: 38052 Psych2Go
7 Psychological Tricks That Work On Anybody
 
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The human mind is a complex system and with some simple psychological tips you can control yourself, look more attractive, and even spend less money. These 7 psychological effects have the power to control a lot of your actions, but as long as you keep them in mind you can stand strong against them and use them for your own good. Ask yourself from time to time, "Am I doing this simply to make somebody like or notice me or because it's what I really want?" And be honest! Try to keep your mind clear and stay critical. Taking part in a questionnaire or survey doesn't automatically mean that you're supposed to give a positive review of the product just because somebody considered you an expert in this particular field. The best way to get something off your brain is to always finish what you’ve started. If there's no way you can do that in real life, then do it in your head. Every time you buy something really expensive, try to be honest with yourself and ask, "Am I paying for the quality or the ‘ooh’s’ and ‘aah’s’ of people around me?" Don't be afraid to look clumsy or do something stupid. In fact, this will only make you cuter and more relatable! These kinds of people seem more approachable than those who strut down the street like royalty. Not nearly as many people as you think actually notice your mishaps because they’re all too busy worrying about themselves! If you have a coffee stain on your shirt or a big zit on your cheek, don't focus on it so much. If you suddenly feel unwell in a public place and you need help ASAP, don't address the whole crowd by shouting “Help!” or “Call 911!” Choose one specific person. This way, you’ll have better chances at being heard and getting the help you need. Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music TIMESTAMPS The Social Facilitation Effect 0:44 The Hawthorne Effect 1:45 The Zeigarnik Effect 2:49 The Veblen Effect 3:51 The Pratfall Effect 4:54 The Spotlight Effect 5:44 The Bystander Effect 7:00 SUMMARY -People tend to act differently depending on whether they’re alone or in the presence of others. -The Observer Effect happens when people modify their behavior if they know they're being watched. When you’re involved in something new and are interested in some experiment, you subconsciously act in a more eager or enthusiastic way. -People are better at remembering information or events that were left incomplete or unfinished. -If you’re a slave to the constant new releases of some phone or luxury bag or whatever, then you've already fallen into the Veblen Effect trap. -People who make silly mistakes or even sometimes look funny seem more attractive and charming. -The Spotlight Effect makes people believe that others notice them more than they really do, especially their faults. -The Bystander Effect says that people are less likely to provide help to a victim if there are others present. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1053892 BRIGHT SIDE
The 9 BEST Scientific Study Tips
 
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Ace any exam with these study tips! How To Learn Faster: https://youtu.be/B9SptdjpJBQ 7 Exam Anxiety Tips: https://youtu.be/FyBdA61GmJ0 Check out TD http://td.com/student SUBSCRIBE (it's free): http://bit.ly/asapsci GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ Written by Amanda Edward, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading: [1] http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052970204644504576653004073453880 [2] http://ideas.time.com/2013/01/09/highlighting-is-a-waste-of-time-the-best- and-worst-learning-techniques/ [3] http://college.usatoday.com/2014/07/29/aiming-for-an-a-study-habits-you- should-adopt-and-avoid/ [4] http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/which-study- strategies-make-the-grade.html [5] http://www.csc.edu/learningcenter/study/studymethods.csc [6] http://www.educationcorner.com/habits-of-successful-students.html [7] http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/07/magazine/why-flunking-exams-is- actually-a-good-thing.html?_r=0 [8] http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/how-does-the-brain-learn- best-10-smart-studying-strategies/ [9] https://news.usc.edu/71969/studying-for-finals-let-classical-music-help/ [10] http://psych.wustl.edu/memory/nestojko/NestojkoBuiKornellBjork(2014).pdf [11] http://www.educationcorner.com/habits-of-successful-students.html
Views: 9543985 AsapSCIENCE
Flow By Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
 
01:23:55
GET 2 AUDIOBOOKS FREE ► http://goo.gl/Vj9NYH Get the Mind Map... ► http://www.josephrodrigues.com/download Mind Map Training ► https://goo.gl/bEKJyV Social Media: Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/officialjosephrodrigues/ Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/officialjosephrodrigues/ iTunes ► https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/insights-perspectives/id1248981048?mt=2 Stitcher ►https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/joseph-rodrigues/insights-perspectives Flow By Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi Csikszentmihalyi is noted for his work in the study of happiness and creativity, but is best known as the architect of the notion of flow and for his years of research and writing on the topic. He is the author of many books and over 120 articles or book chapters. Martin Seligman, former president of the American Psychological Association, described Csikszentmihalyi as the world's leading researcher on positive psychology.[4] Csikszentmihalyi once said: "Repression is not the way to virtue. When people restrain themselves out of fear, their lives are by necessity diminished. Only through freely chosen discipline can life be enjoyed and still kept within the bounds of reason."[5] His works are influential and are widely cited.[6]
Views: 80135 Joseph Rodrigues
19 Psychological Tips That Will Change Your Life
 
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19 Psychological Tricks That Will Improve Your Life. We try so hard to become better, smarter, stronger, and we often don’t look for easy ways. That’s too bad because there are less stressful ways that will give you the same outcome. However, there are less stressful ways to reach your goals. TIMESTAMPS Eye level 0:41 Long light 1:11 Google colors 1:30 Eating slowly 1:51 Zoo uniform 2:23 Banana joy 2:54 Workout coffee break 3:21 Hot spoon 3:47 Location importance 4:09 Saving nap 4:35 Amazing watermelon 4:53 Magic music 5:18 Memory fingers 5:39 Helping hand 6:01 Little men 6:24 Loud relaxation 7:02 Green tea wonders 7:33 Sleeping gymnastics 7:52 Calming yogurt 8:28 BONUS 8:43 SUMMARY - We are likely to buy those things that we see right in front of us. That's why marketing experts put more expensive products (or those that they need to sell fast) right at the level of your eyes. - The candles will last longer if you put them in the freezer before lighting them up. Let some physics in your life. When the wax is frozen, it melts twice as long. - To check the quality of your printer ink, just print the Google logo. We are not sure if this has been done intentionally, but the logo has all the necessary main colors in it. - There is also an experiment stating that “fast eaters” gained about 4lbs in a month only because they were eating too fast, while “slow eaters” ended up with 1,5lbs of weight gaining. - . If you love going to the Zoo, but animals hide from you, you can improve the situation with uniform-like clothes. Take on those things, which are similar to the Zoo workers’ uniform of shape and color. - This yellow fruit is even called “the fruit of happiness,” in case you don’t know. The thing is, only one banana per breakfast is capable of lifting your mood for a half of your usual day. - Fitness and workouts can be tiresome and slowly transform into a routine activity. So, it’s not a secret that people use various additional tricks for the fast fat-burning. - This itching can nearly drive you insane. But there is a simple and very popular hack to cope with it. You just need to place a hot spoon on the bite, and you’ll forget about any itching. - Before calling “911”, first disclose your location. And only then start describing the issue. - A nap during a day improves your memory and protects you from the cardiovascular disease. - Scientists surely know their job! Recently they have proved that watermelon is the natural Viagra with the similar effects: dilation and relaxation. - If you are listening to the music during your workout, you become 15% more productive in lifting weights. - To remember something immediately, clench your fist. This will boost the memory recalling the skills of your brain. - Try to challenge your brain and make any of your ordinary habits (for example, brushing your teeth) with the nondominant hand. - When you have to spend your time with a lot of children, you surely need all of your nerves and patience. If they become too annoying, we usually get upset, and everything ends up in anger and headaches. There is a small funny tip to help you. Try to think of them as of little drunk men. - If you listen to the loud music at home, you feel happier and more relaxed than while doing it at a regular sound level. - Green tea, as well as other metabolism boosters, can be helpful in your slimming. Just drink a cup of green tea and go to bed! - We are happy to share the secret: the “4-7-8” exercise can help you. You need to inhale through your nose for a count of 4, then hold your breath for a count of 7, then exhale through your mouth for the count of 8. Four cycles and you are nearly sleeping! - If you feel anxious, just eat some fat-free yogurt and two spoonfuls of nuts. Amino-acids will help you to calm down. - If you want to know how a person treats you, try to read the body language. Crossed legs and arms mean the “closed” position. Such a person is not ready to trust you. If the person is relaxed and doesn’t cross the limbs – this is the “open” position. And it means this person likes spending time with you and enjoys the conversation. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 11506987 BRIGHT SIDE
Experimental Design - Psychology
 
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The experimental design is a testing method commonly used to test hypotheses in research methods. Although used in all the sciences, this video will more focus on it being applied to psychological studies. This video highlights the experimental method in the infamous Facebook Study. Last Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7uBeshFGN9c Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=designingdonna Twitter: https://twitter.com/designingdonna Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/donnayatz/ Articles: http://www.simplypsychology.org/experimental-designs.html http://www.simplypsychology.org/experimental-method.html http://www.pnas.org/content/111/24/8788.full Transcript: Welcome to Psych IRL. My name is Donna. Today I'm going to be explaining the experimental method to you through a study Facebook may be doing to you right now. The experimental design is the only design that allows you to identify cause and effect relationships. Let's take a look at the famous controversial facebook study as an example. Step 1 of the experimental design is to ask a question. In this case, "can someone's emotions by what their friends post on social media"? So, like I can be happy one minute, I log onto facebook, see my friends posting depressing stuff, and then I start posting depressing stuff. Step 2, Do background research. Studies have shown this emotional contagion in face to face interaction. Step 3 Formulate a Hypothesis. Predict what will happen based on the research you found. I think that if my friends post more sad things then I will be sad. Step 4 Experiment. Figure out your independent variable. This is the variable you will manipulate. In this case it will be emotional content expressed on facebook newsfeed. Next figure out your dependent variable or what you will measure. In this case it will be emotionality expressed in one's own status updates. Who your experiment will affect refers to the population. In this case, it's facebook users. We then take a sample of the population and randomly assign them into 2 groups, the control group or the experimental group. The experimental group will have the variable manipulated. Participants in this group will either have positive statuses shown to them or more negative statuses shown to them. this is the defining characteristic of what makes this an experimental design. You're able to randomly assign participants to either condition. If the experiment asked, "are males more aggressive than females after playing violent video games" then the independent variable would be males and females, but since you can't assign people to gender, this wouldn't be an experimental design. The control group will be used as a comparison to the experimental group. They will have the same number of positive and negative statuses shown to them. Step 5 analyze the data and make conclusions. So, people who had positive content reduced in their news feed, a larger of their words in their own status updates were negative and a smaller percentage of their words were positive. when the negativity was reduced the opposite pattern occurred. So, how did facebook get away with this you ask. Well you know that thing where you accept the terms and use when you first sign up. Yup, that pretty much gives them clearance experiment on you and other stuff. So, this is just a brief overview of the facebook study, if you want to read more about it, check out the article in the description below. I've also linked more articles about the experimental design below, if you're still confused. I will see you next time.
Views: 6865 Psych IRL
The Psychology of Tyranny: Did Milgram Get It Wrong? | Alex Haslam | TEDxUQ
 
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Professor Alex Haslam’s work reviews the famous Milgram’s experiment to show how tyranny and obedience actually work. His talk explores current thinking around the psychology of tyranny centering on a reinterrogation of the conclusions derived from Milgram’s ‘obedience to authority’ research. Alex Haslam is Professor of Psychology and Australian Laureate Fellow at the University of Queensland. His research focuses on the study of group and identity processes in social and organizational contexts. Together with over 200 co-authors, Alex has written and edited 11 books and published over 200 peer-reviewed articles on these topics, and his work had been cited over 20,000 times. In 2013 his book The New Psychology of Leadership won the International Leadership Association’s Outstanding Leadership Book Award. He is a Senior Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and former Editor of the European Journal of Social Psychology. In 2016 he won the British Psychology Society Presidents’ Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Knowledge. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 15633 TEDx Talks
Types of Case Study. Part 1 of 3 on Case Studies
 
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A lecture on case studies as a research strategy taken from a series on research methods and research design given to masters (graduate) students by Graham R Gibbs at the University of Huddersfield. This is part 1 of three, and deals with the different kinds of case studies and looks at some key examples from the social sciences such as single cases, community studies and organizations, institutions, events, roles and relationships as cases. Somer references on case studies Edwards, D. 1. A. (1998) Types of case study work: A conceptual framework for case-based research, Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 3 8(3), pp. 36-70. Gerring, John (2007) Case Study Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Gomm, R., Hammersley, M. & Foster, P. (eds) (2000) Case Study Method. London: Sage. Miles, A B, & Huberman, A.M. (1994) Qualitative data analysis. an expanded sourcebook, Sage. Robson, C. (1993) Real World Research, Oxford: Blackwell. Simons, H. (2009). Case study research in practice. London: SAGE. Stake, R. (1994) Case Studies, In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln Handbook of Qualitative Research, Sage. Swaborn, P (2010) Case Study Research, London: SAGE. Tight, M (2017) Understanding Case Study Research: Small Scale Research with Meaning. Thousand Oaks, CA; London;: SAGE. Thomas, Gary (2016) How to do your case study, 2nd Ed. London: SAGE Travers, M. (2013). Qualitative research through case studies. Thousand Oaks, CA;London;: SAGE. Wilson, S. L. (1995) Single case experimental designs. In G. M. Breakwell, S, Hammond & C. Fife-Shaw (Eds.), Research Method in Psychology, Sage. Yin, R. & (1998) The Abridged Version of Case Study Research: Design and Method. In: L. Bickman & D. J. Rog (Eds.), Handbook of Applied Social Research Methods. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage. pp 229 - 259. Yin, R. K (2014) Case Study Research: Design &Methods, 5th Ed, Sage. Yin, R. K. (2011) Applications of Case Study Research. 3rd Ed. London: Sage.
Views: 170481 Graham R Gibbs
12 Cognitive Biases Explained - How to Think Better and More Logically Removing Bias
 
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We are going to be explaining 12 cognitive biases in this video and presenting them in a format that you can easily understand to help you make better decision in your life. Cognitive biases are flaws in logical thinking that clear the path to bad decisions, so learning about these ideas can reduce errors in your thought process, leading to a more successful life. These biases are very closely related to logical fallacies, which may help you win an argument or present information better. Ismonoff: https://www.youtube.com/user/ismonofftv 1)Anchoring Bias 2)Availability Heuristic bias 3)Bandwagon Bias 4)Choice Supportive Bias 5)Confirmation Bias 6)Ostrich Bias 7)Outcome Bias 8)Overconfidence 9)Placebo bias 10)Survivorship Bias 11)Selective Perception Bias 12)Blind Spot Bias What I make my videos with: http://bit.ly/2fPakuK Insta: https://www.instagram.com/practical_psych/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/practical_psych Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/practicalpsych Check out MY Passive Income Ebook: http://bit.ly/PsychologyIncome
Views: 529988 Practical Psychology
The Impact of Early Emotional Neglect
 
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A lot of our adult problems come down to varieties of emotional neglect suffered in childhood. In this film, we look at one of the most famous experiments in the history of psychology, The Still Face Experiment, devised by Professor Ed Tronick - which gives us an insight into the vulnerability of, and need for love in young children. For gifts and more from The School of Life, visit our online shop: https://bit.ly/2v1rTho Join our mailing list: http://bit.ly/2e0TQNJ Our website has classes, articles and products to help you think and grow: https://bit.ly/2NVwt89 Download our App: https://bit.ly/2Aib6f4 FURTHER READING “Many of us are wandering the world bearing a lot of emotional damage. We may be depressed, anxious or very difficult around sex and relationships. We might in certain moods ask ourselves where the difficulties came from. It’s a continually weird, provocative and yet – in The School of Life’s view – extremely accurate answer that the damage comes, almost always, from childhood, especially early childhood.” You can read more on this and other subjects on our blog, here: https://bit.ly/2LvbX1a MORE SCHOOL OF LIFE Visit us in person at our London HQ: https://bit.ly/2Lx7gnM Watch more films on SELF in our playlist: http://bit.ly/TSOLself You can submit translations and transcripts on all of our videos here: https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7IcJI8PUf5Z3zKxnZvTBog&tab=2 Find out how more here: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623?hl=en-GB SOCIAL MEDIA Feel free to follow us at the links below: Download our App: https://bit.ly/2Aib6f4 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theschooloflifelondon/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheSchoolOfLife Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theschooloflifelondon/ CREDITS Produced in collaboration with: Matt Knott https://www.curtisbrown.co.uk/client/matthew-hammett-knott #TheSchoolOfLife #Psychology #Love
Views: 287551 The School of Life
5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now
 
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Your brain may never be the same! Watch our Q&A: http://youtu.be/thYzq0TEwbs Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. BOX 93, Toronto P, TORONTO, ON, M5S2S6 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71 Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Further Reading-- Abnormal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Internet Addiction Disorder: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0030253 Phantom vibrations among undergraduates: Prevalence and associated psychological characteristics http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563212000799 Cognitive control in media multitaskers http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15583.abstract?sid=113b39d8-d0b5-4f46-b2a5-362ee79d0b61 Amygdala Volume and Social Network Size in Humans http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3079404/ What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience? http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/research&labs/berridge/publications/Berridge&RobinsonBrResRev1998.pdf
Views: 4017493 AsapSCIENCE
6 Types of Childhood Abuse
 
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Childhood abuse can have far reaching effects. From insecurities to intimacy issues, from not daring to trust people to difficulties making friends, the effects of childhood abuse can show in any area of your life. Childhood abuse can develop into lifelong issues, or even Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Today on psych2go, we will learn about different types of abuse. Needless to say, these might be triggering for people so be watchful of what you are comfortable with reading about. There are many more types, so feel free to add others in the comments. Article & research by Kayleigh H: https://psych2go.net/childhood-abuse-types-which-others/ If you enjoyed this video, you can support us by grabbing one of our solar planet bracelet here: https://goo.gl/1XXgG1 or t-shirt here: https://goo.gl/sfWmCZ Happy Sunday and thank you for all the support! Use the discount code: Psych2Go to get 10% off on either items. Sound track: Better Days - Bensound Time Stops - Silent Partner
Views: 1323019 Psych2Go
Attachment Theory: How Your Childhood Shaped You
 
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Our interpersonal relationships start forming as soon as we’re born, and psychologists have studied how those early connections can set the stage for the other relationships we form later in life. Hosted by: Stefan Chin ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Kelly Landrum Jones, Sam Lutfi, Kevin Knupp, Nicholas Smith, D.A. Noe, alexander wadsworth, سلطا الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Bader AlGhamdi, James Harshaw, Patrick Merrithew, Patrick D. Ashmore, Candy, Tim Curwick, charles george, Saul, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Viraansh Bhanushali, Kevin Bealer, Philippe von Bergen, Chris Peters, Justin Lentz ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-Psychology-Context-Stephen-Kosslyn/dp/0205507573 (Pages 554-556) https://courses.lumenlearning.com/boundless-psychology/chapter/theories-of-human-development/ http://www.psychology.sunysb.edu/attachment/online/ew_stability.pdf https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=zUMBCgAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Patterns+of+attachment:+A+psychological+study+of+the+strange+situation&ots=jdcLDlxVFN&sig=3n6lMVCngU62guJaa-uOVj9Bw2A#v=onepage&q=Patterns%20of%20attachment%3A%20A%20psychological%20study%20of%20the%20strange%20situation&f=false https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232424826_Attachment_and_psychopathology_in_adulthood https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=eZMxoRs5aUkC&oi=fnd&pg=PP2&dq=attachment+theory+in+adulthood&ots=bVxwLQgM0O&sig=d678JQzTGw1LfkApD72ANo-byoY#v=onepage&q=attachment%20theory%20in%20adulthood&f=false https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=SKidSuluprgC&oi=fnd&pg=PP2&dq=erikson+developmental+stages&ots=E60eEsNiEI&sig=cP-vplYHR6yM7-MKc6-81-90rXI#v=onepage&q=erikson%20developmental%20stages&f=false https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3861901/pdf/nihms529403.pdf https://www.nichd.nih.gov/research/supported/seccyd/Pages/overview.aspx http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14616734.2016.1259335?journalCode=rahd20 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14616734.2012.672280 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3670111/pdf/nihms468524.pdf https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/reactive-attachment-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20352939 https://internal.psychology.illinois.edu/~rcfraley/attachment.htm http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1111/jftr.12045/full http://psycnet.apa.org/record/1997-06133-015 https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ960225.pdf
Views: 323897 SciShow
Taking Notes: Crash Course Study Skills #1
 
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The first step in honing your new study skills is to take better notes. This week Thomas will tell you everything you need to know to come to class prepared and find a note-taking system that will help you retain and review like a champ. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/catalog/desktop.html Resources: Study on computer vs. paper note-taking: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0956797614524581 Evernote: https://evernote.com/ OneNote: https://www.onenote.com/ Dropbox Paper: https://paper.dropbox.com Coggle (mind-mapping tool): https://coggle.it/ *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Les Aker, Bob Kunz, Mark Austin, William McGraw, Jeffrey Thompson, Ruth Perez, Jason A Saslow, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Advait Shinde, Rachel Bright, Khaled El Shalakany, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Dominic Dos Santos, Indika Siriwardena, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Tom Trval, Cami Wilson, Moritz Schmidt, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 964280 CrashCourse
The Attachment Theory: How Childhood Shapes Your Life
 
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The attachment theory argues that a strong emotional and physical bond to one primary caregiver in our first years of life, is critical to our development. If our bonding is strong and we are securely attached, then we feel safe to explore the world. If our bond is weak, we feel insecurely attached. We are afraid to leave or explore a rather scary-looking world. Because we are not sure if we can return. Often we then don't understand our own feelings. Special thanks for our patroeon supporters: Ville Medeiros, Chutimon Nuangnit, Cedric Wang, Mike, Eva Marie Koblin, Julien Dumesnil, Mathis and the others. You are amazing !!! If you feel helpful and want to support our channel, visit www.patreon.com/sprouts Full Script: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v82PcEvf_G2iolc5ejPY5dQ2RtqU1Vj9V5L_iIKWUhk/edit?usp=sharing Dealing with Attachment Issues: Dealing with Attachment Issues is no easy task. For those who feel like they can’t help themselves, or can’t find trust through their partners of family, we recommend looking for professional support through a therapy. If you are able to form a secure attachment to a therapist, he can become the one who provides you with that secure base. Here three of possible therapies: 1. Psychoanalysis. The aim of psychoanalysis therapy is to release repressed emotions and experiences, i.e., make the unconscious conscious. In order to do that they therapist might try to bring back some childhood memories, to work at the root cause of the problem. 2. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). CBT is a psycho-social intervention that is widely used for improving mental health. Instead of trying to bring you back in time, it aims to explain you whats going on inside your brain and how to cope with irrational feelings or fears. 3. The Hoffmann Process. This 7-8 days guided process, designed by the American psychologist Hoffmann, brings participants back into their childhood to reconnect with their parents at the time when attachment is formed. Its very intensive. Sources: Havard Study https://arizona.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/feelings-of-parental-caring-predict-health-status-in-midlife-a-35 Minnesota Study https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2857405/ Further Readins: https://www.psychologistworld.com/developmental/attachment-theory
Views: 523342 Sprouts
The Lesser-Known Symptoms of Depression
 
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Depression is not just feeling hopeless or apathetic, there are lots more symptoms that we aren’t familiar with. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Lazarus G, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, سلطان الخليفي, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, Tim Curwick, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0146356 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181884/ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032705003368 https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/1171078 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20571485 https://www.asianjournalofpsychiatry.com/article/S1876-2018(12)00138-4/fulltext https://www.asianjournalofpsychiatry.com/cms/attachment/2005812320/2025495756/gr1_lrg.jpg https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2836938/#R2 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/psychological-medicine/article/cognitive-functions-in-depressive-disorders-evidence-from-a-populationbased-study/1B9653731327E8907CF6FC1B9735F980 https://www.psy-journal.com/article/S0165-1781(05)00260-X/fulltext https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/1737169 http://articles.latimes.com/2013/oct/08/science/la-sci-angry-irritable-depression-20131008 https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2012/06/06/oh-the-guilt-the-neurobiology-of-blaming-yourself-for-everything-when-youre-depressed/#65aa108924fd https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/overcoming-self-sabotage/201002/rumination-problem-solving-gone-wrong http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0076564 Image Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hall_Freud_Jung_in_front_of_Clark_1909.jpg
Views: 302355 SciShow Psych
Augmenter mon self-contrôle JSpsy 2
 
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Si vous voulez augmenter votre self-contrôle, attention ! Tous les conseils ne sont pas bons à prendre Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Jean-simon-ramez-289458521595342/ Bibliographie par ordre alphabétique : Boyle, Lawton, Allen, Croden, Smith, Dye (2016) No effects of ingesting or rinsing sucrose on depleted self-control performance, Physiology & Behavior 154, 151–160 Dang (2016) Testing the role of glucose in self-control: A meta-analysis, Appetite, 107, 222-230 Dewall, Deckman, Gailliot, Bushman (2011) Sweetened Blood Cools Hot Tempers: Physiological Self-Control and Aggression. Aggress Behav, 37(1): 73–80. Gailliot, Baumeister, DeWall, Maner, Plant, Tice, Brewer, Schmeichel (2007) Self-Control Relies on Glucose as a Limited Energy Source: Willpower Is More Than a Metaphor. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 92, No. 2, 325–336 Hagger, Chatzisarantis (2013) The Sweet Taste of Success: The Presence of Glucose in the Oral Cavity Moderates the Depletion of Self-Control Resources, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 39(1), 27-41. Kurzban (2010) Does the Brain Consume Additional Glucose During Self-Control Tasks ? Evolutionary psychology, 8(2): 244-259 Lange et Eggert (2014) Sweet delusion. Glucose drinks fail to counteract ego depletion Appetite 75 54–63 Lange, Seer, Rapior, Rose et Eggert (2014). Turn It All You Want: Still No Effect of Sugar Consumption on Ego Depletion. Journal of European Psychology Students, 5(3), p1-8 Molden, Hui, Scholer, Meier, Noreen, D’Agostino et Martin (2012) Motivational Versus Metabolic Effects of Carbohydrates on Self-Control, Psychological Science Schimmack, U. (2012). The ironic effect of significant results on the credibility of multiple-study articles. Psychological Methods, 17, 551–566 Vadillo, Gold, Osman (2016) The Bitter Truth About Sugar and Willpower: The Limited Evidential Value of the Glucose Model of Ego Depletion, psychological science.
Views: 55 jean simon ramez
Quantitative Research Designs: Descriptive non-experimental, Quasi-experimental or Experimental?
 
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http://youstudynursing.com/ Get my research terminology eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Students often have difficulty classifying quantitative research designs. In quantitative research, designs can be classified into one of three categories: descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. To identify which of these designs your study is using follow the steps in this video. Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam **The PDF version of my book is better and is being approved by Google Play right now. For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://books.google.ca/books/about/Research_terminology_simplified.html?id=tLMRAgAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA0-RMPi7qE&feature=share&list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam Students often have difficulty classifying quantitative research designs. In quantitative research, designs can be classified into one of three categories: descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. To identify which of these designs your study is using follow the steps in this video. First, ask yourself if the researchers did anything to the participants. More specifically, was there an intervention? ...If the answer is yes, there was an intervention, then the study is either a quasi-experimental or experimental. I will tell you how to decide in a moment. If the answer is no, the study is descriptive non-experimental. Sure, you could be more specific in the description of the design, but for the purposes of grouping your research in a literature review this label is often sufficient at an undergraduate level. Descriptive non-experimental studies may also be called observational. Some examples of more specific labels include case control, cohort and correlational studies. ... To find out if the design is experimental ask yourself if it is a randomized controlled trial. Randomized controlled trials are considered the gold standard or "best" possible design (in quantitative research). You may also hear randomized controlled trails referred to as true experiments. However, in the real world it is difficult to conduct a true randomized controlled trial in many situations, which means that a lot of studies are done that are not classified as randomized controlled trials. Randomized control trials have three key components: a random sample, a control group and an intervention. If your study is truly a randomized control trial it should say in the abstract and/or the methods section of the article. If it doesn't say then it is likely that the study is either descriptive non-experimental or quasi-experimental. You can tell the difference by looking into the methods section further. ...If there is no control group than the study is quasi-experimental. A control group is a group of people that enter the study but do not receive the intervention under study. Instead, they are used for the purpose of comparison. If the sample was not randomized properly or adequately or even at all then the study is also quasi-experimental. You may also see this type of study being called a non-randomized trial. ... Sometimes I see students that are confused about the study design because of terms that relate to the length of time the study was conducted or the sampling process. ... Terms like cross-sectional and longitudinal tell you how much time the study was conducted over. Cross sectional means that data were collected at one point in time. Longitudinal means that data were collected over a long period of time. These terms alone will not tell you if the study is descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. If you use these words to describe your study design in the absence of one of the labels we discussed in this video you will not have given your teacher enough information about the study design to properly classify it. Other confusing terms often relate to the way samples were collected, like convenience sampling. Convenience sampling means that the sample was readily available or accessible to the researchers. This term will give you the hint that the study does not have a random sample and is therefore not a randomized controlled trial, but you still need to classify it further as descriptive non-experimental or quasi-experimental. To decide how to classify the design of a study you are looking at, follow the steps outlined in this video. Ask yourself the following three questions: Was there an intervention? Is there a control group? Was the sample random? ...
Views: 177667 NurseKillam
11 Military Hacks That’ll Make Your Life Easier
 
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Being a soldier often requires some real-life MacGyvering. But you don’t have to be in the military to benefit from tips like putting duct tape on your feet to prevent blisters or using cotton balls and Vaseline to get your campfire started. Here are 11 hacks from the men and women in uniform that’ll make your life a lot easier! For instance, there’s a very particular hack when it comes to those super shiny soldier shoes. Take a generous amount of shoe shine, rub it on your leather shoes or boots, and let it sit for 10-15 minutes. Then, go over the area with a lighter or flame, and get ready to see your own reflection! For a finishing touch, use a clean damp cloth to polish the surface. If you want to know about other tricks, watch the video! TIMESTAMPS: Duct taping your feet 0:40 Ladder lacing for added ankle support 1:25 Maxi pads for first-aid 2:38 Putting sugar on wounds 3:17 Running tights for added warmth 3:52 Super shiny shoes 4:19 The military tuck 5:00 Cotton and Vaseline as a fire starter 5:42 Lose a tail when driving 6:18 Making a pristine bed 6:39 Peeing in the shower 7:34 #militaryhacks #lifehacks #makeyourlifeeasier Music by Epidemic Sound https://www.epidemicsound.com/ SUMMARY: - Nowadays, soldiers use duct tape to prevent blisters and calluses caused by those notoriously uncomfortable military boots. - If you still have a lot of lace left (although you shouldn’t with this laddering technique), just wrap it around your ankle and then tie it. Tuck the remaining laces inside your shoe. - In case of an emergency, you can use sanitary pads to prevent a wound from bleeding out. - Speaking of first-aid in a pinch, you can put sugar on a wound to prevent bacterial infection. Don’t worry because this unconventional medical treatment has scientific backing based on a study by the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine. - Running or compression tights aren’t just for jogging or making a fashion statement. You can wear them under almost any pants without them being noticeable. - Covering cotton balls in petroleum jelly and lighting them on fire, you get a strong but steady flame that keeps on burning. A great hack next time you go camping! - If you ever feel like the driver in your rearview mirror is following you, all you gotta do is make 4 consecutive turns in a row. This is usually the best way to lose a tail! - According to the medical community, it actually prevents and cures athlete’s foot! Urine has natural properties like uric acid and ammonia that help fight fungal infections. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1769643 BRIGHT SIDE
Improve Your Self Discipline with 3 Psychology Tips
 
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Please Subscribe for 3-4x Videos Per Week + Live Broadcasts! http://ThomasDeLauer.com Improve Your Self Discipline with 3 Psychology Tips 1) Don’t wait for it to “feel right.” (Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit) Habit behaviors are traced to a part of the brain called the basal ganglia - a portion of the brain associated with emotions, patterns, and memories Decisions, on the other hand, are made in the prefrontal cortex (section of the brain right behind your forehead), a completely different area Embrace the wrong and acknowledge that it will take a while for your new regime to feel right (1,2) Called the habit loop - a behavior becomes automatic, the decision-making part of your brain goes into a sleep mode of sorts. Prefrontal Cortex & Sleep Sleep deprivation hits the prefrontal cortex is hard, and it loses control over the regions of the brain that create cravings and the stress response One of the most acclaimed sleep researchers, Daniel Kripke, found in a study that "people who sleep between 6.5 hours and 7.5 hours a night, live the longest, are happier, and most productive." When the sleep-deprived catch a better night's sleep, their brain scans no longer show signs of prefrontal cortex impairment (3,4) 2) Set Clear Goals (SMART Goals) The more specific the goal, the better able people are to reach it- a highly abstract goal may not be actionable SMART is a mnemonic acronym, giving criteria to guide in the setting of objectives - has suffered from acronym drift, but the most common definition is Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-based (5) Goal Setting and the Brain The human brain can’t tell the difference between what we want and what we have, so setting a goal invests ourselves into the target as if we’d already accomplished it By setting something as a goal, however small or large, however near or far in the future, a part of our brain believes that desired outcome is an essential part of who we are Brain & Rewards With every achievement along the path to meeting our goal, our body releases dopamine into our brains, creating a sense of pleasure, which keeps us focused and motivated - we physically feel good when we’re taking steps towards our goals Conversely, if you fail to meet your goals, your brain will have the opposite effect - failure to meet a goal means the dopamine supply gets cut off. (6,7) 3) The Why & How Mindsets “Why” questions encourage long-term thinking, or desirability of pursuing an action; in contrast, “How” questions bring the mind down to the present and consider a goal’s attainability or feasibility (8) References 1) Habits: How They Form And How To Break Them. (2012, March 5). Retrieved from https://www.npr.org/2012/03/05/147192599/habits-how-they-form-and-how-to-break-them 2) Cohen, J. (2015, April 6). 5 Proven Methods For Gaining Self Discipline. Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/jennifercohen/2014/06/18/5-proven-methods-for-gaining-self-discipline/ 3) 6 Ways to Develop Greater Willpower and Discipline. (2017, July 11). Retrieved from https://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/the-science-of-self-control-6-ways-to-develop-grea.html 4) How Much Sleep Do We Really Need to Work Productively? (2012, August 8). Retrieved from https://blog.bufferapp.com/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need-to-work-productively 5) http://www.hr.virginia.edu/uploads/documents/media/Writing_SMART_Goals.pdf 6) The Psychology of Goal Setting. (2014, December 16). Retrieved from https://blog.rjmetrics.com/2014/12/16/the-psychology-of-goal-setting/ 7) The Science of Setting Goals. (2008, July 7). Retrieved from http://www.lifehack.org/articles/featured/the-science-of-setting-goals.html 8) 10 Strategies for Developing Self-Control. (2017, March 25). Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/science-choice/201703/10-strategies-developing-self-control
Views: 77419 Thomas DeLauer
Dissecting a Peer Reviewed Scholarly Journal Article
 
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This video will show you how to quickly dissect a peer-reviewed scholarly journal article for discussing in a research paper or course discussion board.
Views: 9464 DrCraigMarkson
4 Psychological Terms That You're Using Incorrectly
 
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At some point, you’ve probably heard someone use any or all of these four words to describe someone. But there’s a really excellent chance that person had no idea what these terms mean. But SciShow is here to help clear up some of these definitions, and explain why the weather isn’t schizophrenic, and how your ex probably isn’t actually a psychopath. Hosted by: Hank Green ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/collections/scishow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://mentalwellnesscenter.org/cm/OnlineEducation/Schizophrenia.html http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-15213824 http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/01/schizophrenia_definition_and_metaphor_schizophrenic_does_not_mean_multiple.html http://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/survivingmentalhealthstigma/2013/08/mental-health-stigma-and-the-misuse-of-words/ http://www.thefrisky.com/2013-11-07/kylie-jenner-sparks-twitter-frenzy-over-her-misuse-of-the-term-bipolar/
Views: 1141880 SciShow
The Psychology of Trolling
 
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As denizens of the internet, most of us are familiar with the trolls. In this episode of SciShow, learn a little about how social scientists think trolls came to be, and how online communities are figuring it all out. Learn more about Butt Hair: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgsdhmLrLPA Learn more about Trolling: https://youtu.be/dQw4w9WgXcQ?t=42s Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Kathy & Tim Philip, Kevin Bealer, Andreas Heydeck, Thomas J., Accalia Elementia, Will and Sonja Marple. James Harshaw, Justin Lentz, Chris Peters, Bader AlGhamdi, Benny, Tim Curwick, Philippe von Bergen, Patrick Merrithew, Fatima Iqbal, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Patrick D. Ashmore, and charles george. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2013-05/30/online-aggression http://www.academia.edu/3658367/The_online_disinhibition_effect http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/troll http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2179886 http://archive.wired.com/gaming/virtualworlds/magazine/16-02/mf_goons?currentPage=all http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886914000324 http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/climate_desk/2014/02/internet_troll_personality_study_machiavellianism_narcissism_psychopathy.html http://members.shaw.ca/ssucur/materials/02_selected_notes/06_tempest/03_PaulhusWilliams.pdf http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/narcissistic-personality-disorder/basics/definition/con-20025568 http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-psychopath-means/ http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/03/magazine/03trolls-t.html?_r=0 http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/sep/18/psychology-internet-trolls-pewdiepie-youtube-mary-beard http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/12015777/Psychology-of-a-troll-free-speech-or-pure-sadism.html http://www.internetworldstats.com/top25.htm http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/america-tonight/articles/2015/6/9/troll-hunter-confronts-swedens-anonymous-internet-haters.html http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/feb/02/what-happened-confronted-cruellest-troll-lindy-west Image Sources: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Trollet_som_grunner_p%C3%A5_hvor_gammelt_det_er.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Anonymous_emblem.svg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niccol%C3%B2_Machiavelli#/media/File:Portrait_of_Niccol%C3%B2_Machiavelli_by_Santi_di_Tito.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Narcissus-Caravaggio_(1594-96)_edited.jpg
Views: 1006440 SciShow
PSYCHOLOGY OF THE GITA: Swami Narasimhananda at IIT Kanpur
 
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On the occasion of the 150th Birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda, Vivekananda Samiti, IIT Kanpur organized a Lecture cum Workshop Series on Holistic Living: The Manuals of Life by Swami Narasimhananda, monastic member of the Ramakrishna Order, presently residing in Advaita Ashrama, Kolkata on 25-27th February, 2013.. About the Speaker: Swami Narasimhananda is a young scholarly monk of the Ramakrishna Order, residing in Advaita Ashrama, Kolkata. He is presently the City Editor of the journal Prabuddha Bharata, started by Swami Vivekananda in 1896. He also edits books in English and Hindi published from Advaita Ashrama, Kolkata, one of the largest publishing house of spiritual literature. He regularly writes articles on various themes of philosophy, religion, sociology, and allied social sciences. He also delivers talks, both informal and academic, at various institutions including IIT Kharagpur, where he delivers classes on the Upanishads and the Gita. [email protected] www.iitk.ac.in/vs https://www.facebook.com/vsiitk https://www.facebook.com/groups/vsiitk/ http://www.youtube.com/user/vsiitk
Views: 292036 Vivekananda Samiti
What is APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY? What does APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY mean? APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY meaning
 
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What is APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY? What does APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY mean? APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY meaning - APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY definition - APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Applied psychology is the use of psychological methods and findings of scientific psychology to solve practical problems of human and animal behavior and experience. Mental health, organizational psychology, business management, education, health, product design, ergonomics, and law are just a few of the areas that have been influenced by the application of psychological principles and findings. Some of the areas of applied psychology include clinical psychology, counseling psychology, evolutionary psychology, industrial and organizational psychology, legal psychology, neuropsychology, occupational health psychology, human factors, forensic psychology, engineering psychology, school psychology, sports psychology, traffic psychology, community psychology, medical psychology. In addition, a number of specialized areas in the general field of psychology have applied branches (e.g., applied social psychology, applied cognitive psychology). However, the lines between sub-branch specializations and major applied psychology categories are often blurred. For example, a human factors psychologist might use a cognitive psychology theory. This could be described as human factor psychology or as applied cognitive psychology. The founder of applied psychology was Hugo Münsterberg. He came to America from Italy, and, like many aspiring psychologists during the late 19th century, originally studied philosophy. Münsterberg had many interests in the field of psychology such as purposive psychology, social psychology and forensic psychology. In 1907 he wrote several magazine articles concerning legal aspects of testimony, confessions and courtroom procedures, which eventually developed into his book, On the Witness Stand. The following year the Division of Applied Psychology was adjoined to the Harvard Psychological Laboratory. Within 9 years he had contributed eight books in English, applying psychology to education, industrial efficiency, business and teaching. Eventually Hugo Münsterberg and his contributions would define him as the creator of applied psychology. In 1920, the International Association of Applied Psychology (IAAP) was founded, as the first international scholarly society within the field of psychology. Most professional psychologists in the U.S. worked in an academic setting until World War II. But during the war, the armed forces and the Office of Strategic Services hired psychologists in droves to work on issues such as troop morale and propaganda design. After the war, psychologists found an expanding range of jobs outside of the academy. Since 1970, the number of college graduates with degrees in psychology has more than doubled, from 33,679 to 76,671 in 2002. The annual numbers of masters' and PhD degrees have also increased dramatically over the same period. All the while, degrees in the related fields of economics, sociology, and political science have remained constant. Professional organizations have organized special events and meetings to promote the idea of applied psychology. In 1990, the American Psychological Society held a Behavioral Science Summit and formed the "Human Capital Initiative", spanning schools, workplace productivity, drugs, violence, and community health. The American Psychological Association declared 2000–2010 the Decade of Behavior, with a similarly broad scope. Psychological methods are considered applicable to all aspects of human life and society.
Views: 8798 The Audiopedia

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