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What are government bonds? - EduPop - Museo del Risparmio
 
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In order to get enough money to carry out its activities, a state must issue certificates also known as government bonds. Get to the core of the matter with this video of the EduPop series, the financial education project of Museo del Risparmio. http://www.museodelrisparmio.it
Views: 7662 Intesa Sanpaolo
Corporate Bonds
 
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Build your investment knowledge about corporate bonds and why they are issued, along with the different risks and benefits that are involved with secured and unsecured corporate bonds. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 45811 Zions TV
Bonds (Corporate Bonds, Municipal Bonds, Government Bonds, etc.) Explained in One Minute
 
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Whether we're talking about corporate bonds, municipal bonds, government bonds or other types of bonds, the principle is simple: an entity requests a loan and a lender is willing to offer money to the entity in question in exchange for interest (although in our current low to zero to negative interest environment, that part is debatable). Through this one minute video, I've explained how the process works. Please like, comment and subscribe if you've enjoyed the video. To support the channel, give me a minute (see what I did there?) of your time by visiting OneMinuteEconomics.com and reading my message. Bitcoin donations can be sent to 1AFYgM8Cmiiu5HjcXaP5aS1fEBJ5n3VDck and PayPal donations to [email protected], any and all support is greatly appreciated! Oh and I've also started playing around with Patreon, my link is: https://www.patreon.com/oneminuteeconomics Interested in reading a good book? My first book, Wealth Management 2.0 (through which I do my best to help people manage their wealth properly, whether we're talking about someone who has a huge amount of money at his disposal or someone who is still living paycheck to paycheck), can be bought using the links below: Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Wealth-Management-2-0-Financial-Professionals-ebook/dp/B01I1WA2BK Barnes & Noble - http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/wealth-management-20-andrei-polgar/1124435282?ean=2940153328942 iBooks (Apple) - https://itun.es/us/wYSveb.l Kobo - https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/ebook/wealth-management-2-0 My second book, the Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestseller The Age of Anomaly (through which I help people prepare for financial calamities and become more financially resilient in general), can be bought using the links below. Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Age-Anomaly-Spotting-Financial-Uncertainty-ebook/dp/B078SYL5YS Barnes & Noble - https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-age-of-anomaly-andrei-polgar/1127084693?ean=2940155383970 iBooks (Apple) - https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/age-anomaly-spotting-financial-storms-in-sea-uncertainty/id1331704265 Kobo - https://www.kobo.com/ww/en/ebook/the-age-of-anomaly-spotting-financial-storms-in-a-sea-of-uncertainty Last but not least, if you'd like to follow me on social media, use one of the links below: https://www.facebook.com/oneminuteeconomics https://twitter.com/andreipolgar https://ro.linkedin.com/in/andrei-polgar-9a11a561
Views: 36376 One Minute Economics
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 455972 Khan Academy
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 225996 Khan Academy
How bonds work
 
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Investing can sometimes seem like either like a gamble or very dull. At the "gambling" end of the spectrum are shares, with the possibility of swift ups in price and swift drops in price. At the other end is cash in the bank -- a predictable investment with few changes day-to-day or month-on-month. Investors looking for a middle ground and looking to diversify do have other options. They can consider bonds. Bonds are something of a mystery to many people -- perhaps because they are not often talked about. But bonds can play an important role in managing investments. They can be a half way house between the risk of shares and property and the safety of cash. How do bonds work? At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Or, more technically, it is a large loan that has been split into packages and sold to investors. Bond holders typically make money by receiving regular payments of interest (known as coupons) during the life of the loan. When the loan ends, their original investment is returned. Bonds may have lives of just a year or two or for 10, 20 or even 30 years. You can buy individual bonds or opt for units in a bond fund run by an asset manager. Like shares, bonds or bond funds can usually be sold at any time and the value of your investment may rise or fall. But bond prices usually move less than shares. That is why they are considered safer than shares but they are more risky than a bank deposit. The original investment and the coupon payments are secure for bonds, while with shares, there is no guarantee of receiving dividend payments -- or your original investment. Looking a bit more closely, there are two main types of bonds -- corporate bonds and government bonds. Corporate bonds are loans made by companies. Government bonds are loans made by governments. Corporate bonds are more risky because the company issuing the bond may go bankrupt. In bankruptcy, though, bond holders are paid before shareholders. Governments rarely go bankrupt so government bonds are safer than corporate bonds. And the lower interest rate on government bonds reflects this. Getting more technical, different types of bonds are designed to work in different financial conditions. In particular, index-linked bonds pay coupons and the original investment in a way that compensates for inflation. The can be attractive to investors who want to ensure the value of their investment does not fall if prices rise. Bonds don't have to be part of your investment portfolio. Some people are happy to invest exclusively in shares and property but if you want to spread your investment risk, if you want to diversify, remember that there is always a half way house in bonds.
Views: 85365 ING eZonomics
Are U.S. Government Bonds AAA or Junk?…And Who’s Lying?
 
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The U.S. government is in debt $21 Trillion, an amount that can never be paid. Yet Moody’s and Fitch reaffirmed their top AAA rating on U.S. debt. Why do they do this? Do they have to? Why can’t politicians, the media, CEO’s, or anyone else, ever tell Americans the truth?
Views: 10494 RonPaulLibertyReport
What is a Bond | by Wall Street Survivor
 
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What is a bond? Learn more at: https://www.wallstreetsurvivor.com A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to a corporate entity or government. The funds are borrowed for a defined period of time at either a variable or fixed interest rate. If you want a guaranteed money-maker, bonds are a much safer option than most. There are many times of bonds, however, and each type has a different risk level. Unlike stocks, which are equity instruments, bonds are debt instruments. When bonds are first issued by the company, the investor/lender typically gives the company $1,000 and the company promises to pay the investor/lender a certain interest rate every year (called the Coupon Rate), AND, repay the $1,000 loan when the bond matures (called the Maturity Date). For example, GE could issue a 30 year bond with a 5% coupon. The investor/lender gives GE $1,000 and every year the lender receives $50 from GE, and at the end of 30 years the investor/ lender gets his $1,000 back. Bonds di er from stocks in that they have a stated earnings rate and will provide a regular cash flow, in the form of the coupon payments to the bondholders. This cash flow contributes to the value and price of the bond and affects the true yield (earnings rate) bondholders receive. There are no such promises associated with common stock ownership. After a bond has been issued directly by the company, the bond then trades on the exchanges. As supply and demand forces start to take effect the price of the bond changes from its initial $1,000 face value. On the date the GE bond was issued, a 5% return was acceptable given the risk of GE. But if interest rates go up and that 5% return becomes unacceptable, the price of the GE bond will drop below $1,000 so that the effective yield will be higher than the 5% Coupon Rate. Conversely, if interest rates in general go down, then that 5% GE Coupon Rate starts looking attractive and investors will bid the price of the bond back above $1,000. When a bond trades above its face value it is said to be trading at a premium; when a bond trades below its face value it is said to be trading at a discount. Understanding the difference between your coupon payments and the true yield of a bond is critical if you ever trade bonds. Confused? Don't worry check out the video and head over to http://courses.wallstreetsurvivor.com/invest-smarter/
Views: 108682 Wall Street Survivor
MMT: Why Do Governments That Issue Their Own Currency Bother To Sell Bonds?
 
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Professor L. Randall Wray on why a government with a sovereign non-convertible currency might choose to issue bonds. Bond sales are not a borrowing operation for the state. Logically, since the dollar is a liability (an IOU) of the government, it's impossible for the government to borrow back dollars, just like it would be impossible for you to borrow back your own student loan debt, or for Pizza Hut to borrow back its own coupons. Rather, a bond sale is just a swap of one government-issued asset (cash) for another (bonds) which pays interest. It doesn't change the amount of assets or liabilities out there, only the form. A government that issues its own non-convertible currency does not need to sell bonds in order to spend. This is because it issues the currency every time it spends (and destroys the currency when it taxes). The main reason such a government might want to sell bonds is because of its effects on interest rates. If the government is running a deficit, then it is creating more money than it destroys through taxes. This means that the banking system will have excess reserves, more than they need to settle inter-bank payments and meet reserve requirements. Normally, banks don't want to hold excess reserves, they'd rather purchase some other higher-interest-earning asset. So they will take the excess reserves and try and loan them to other banks (note that they cannot loan them to the public. That would be impossible, because the public does not have accounts at the Fed, and reserves only exist in accounts at the Fed). The market for interbank loans is called the "Federal Funds market" in the United States. The system-wide position of excess reserves, that everybody is trying to get rid of but nobody wants, will drive interest rates down, potentially to zero. If the central bank doesn't want to have a zero overnight interest rate, if they prefer a higher rate target, then they need to drain the excess reserves, and the government does this by selling bonds and destroying the reserves. (And it's identical whether it's the Fed or the Treasury doing the selling.) The government does not need to do this. They could simply leave excess reserves in the banking system, and then have a permanent zero overnight interest rate. Or, they could stop selling bonds, but raise the interest rate by directly paying interest on reserves, because no bank will lend out reserves for less interest than they could get by simply leaving them parked in its Fed account. So, bond sales are actually part of a monetary policy operation to sustain an interest rate higher than the interest rate paid on bank reserves (which is usually zero). A government might also offer bonds to its citizens if it would like to give them risk-free interest income. (For a government that manages its exchange rate, such as through a gold standard, the government may be forced to sell bonds in order to maintain the exchange rate peg. This is because savings held in currency is eligible to be converted to the gold or pegged currency, while savings held in bonds is not. So the government can sell bonds to take pressure off of its exchange rate, and prevent it from running out of foreign currency (or gold) reserves.) See the whole lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i35uBVeNp6c Like Deficit Owls on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeficitOwls/
Views: 5152 Deficit Owls
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
What are Municipal Bonds?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Municipal Bonds” Municipal bonds are issued by a government, such as a state, county, district or municipality. Issuers often use the money to pay for public projects, like roads or construction projects, that would otherwise come directly out of taxpayers’ pockets. In most cases, the interest holders of municipal bonds receive is exempt from federal taxes, which is a huge appeal for investors. Maturities can range from the short term, usually one to three years, to a decade or longer. Municipal bonds called munis are debt obligations issued by government entities. When you buy a municipal bond, you are loaning money to the issuer in exchange for a set number of interest payments over a predetermined period. At the end of that period, the bond reaches its maturity date, and the full amount of your original investment is returned to you. While municipal bonds are available in both taxable and tax-exempt formats, the tax-exempt bonds tend to get the most attention because the income they generate is for most investors exempt from federal and, in many cases, state and local income taxes. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 465888 Khan Academy
New 40000 Premium Prize Bonds issued by Government of Pakistan | Complete Information in Urdu
 
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In this video i am going to tell you the details of premium prize bonds issued by Government of Pakistan. Like my facebook page please https://www.facebook.com/bilalyoutubewala/
Views: 77516 Bilal YouTube Wala
What is GOVERNMENT BOND? What does GOVERNMENT BOND mean? GOVERNMENT BOND meaning
 
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What is GOVERNMENT BOND? What does GOVERNMENT BOND mean? GOVERNMENT BOND meaning. A government bond is a bond issued by a national government, generally with a promise to pay periodic interest payments and to repay the face value on the maturity date. Government bonds are usually denominated in the country's own currency. Another term similar to government bond is "sovereign bond". Technically any bond issued by a sovereign entity is a sovereign bond but sometimes the term is used to refer to bonds issued in a currency other than the sovereign's currency. If a government or sovereign is close to default on its debt the media often refer to this as a sovereign debt crisis. The terms on which a government can sell bonds depend on how creditworthy the market considers it to be. International credit rating agencies will provide ratings for the bonds, but market participants will make up their own minds about this.
Views: 2747 The Audiopedia
government bond explained | government schemes 2018 | What are bonds | latest bonds
 
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Hello friends in this video we will see latest bonds from government. The government has announced the launch of 7.75% Savings (Taxable) Bonds, 2018, which will open for subscription from January 10, 2018. The bonds will have a maturity of seven years. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 46204 Fin Baba
#GuessTheFinance - Government bonds
 
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They’re issued by national governments to finance balance deficits. What are they? Here we are with our fourth episode of #GuessTheFinance
Views: 122 GruppoGenerali
Amortizing a Bond Premium
 
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This video explains how to account for bonds issued at a premium. An example is provided to illustrate how to calculate the bond proceeds, premium, interest expense, amortization of the bond premium, and the carrying value of the bonds. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 54375 Edspira
What are Treasury Securities?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Treasury Securities” These U.S. government-issued debt securities are divided into three categories by maturity dates: Treasury bonds mature in 10 or more years, Treasury notes mature between one and 10 years and Treasury bills mature in one year or less. These debt obligations are considered the safest option for bond investors since they are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. But that safety comes at a price: The interest rates on Treasury’s are lower than other bonds with the same duration. Treasury securities are divided into three categories according to their lengths of maturities. These three types of bonds share many common characteristics, but also have some key differences. The categories and key features of treasury securities include: T-Bills – These have the shortest range of maturities of all government bonds at 4, 13, 26 and 52 weeks. They are the only type of treasury security found in both the capital and money markets, as three of the maturity terms fall under the 270-day dividing line between them. T-Bills are issued at a discount and mature at par value, with the difference between the purchase and sale prices constituting the interest paid on the bill. T-Notes – These notes represent the middle range of maturities in the treasury family, with maturity terms of 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years currently available. Treasury notes are issued at a $1,000 par value and mature at the same price. They pay interest semiannually. T-Bonds – Commonly referred to in the investment community as the “long bond”, T-Bonds are essentially identical to T-Notes except that they mature in 30 years. T-Bonds are also issued at and mature at a $1,000 par value and pay interest semiannually. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
What Is The Government Bond??
 
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A government bond or ''sovereign bond'' is a issued by national government, generally with promise to pay periodic interest payments and repay the face value on maturity date aug 13, 2016 has restarted its quantitive easing programme, printing money buy own bonds back from city firms. Government bond investopedia terms g government. Imagine a reasons to choose us treasury bond, treasuries issued by the government; Features, benefits and risks of bills from fidelity mar 21, 2011 bond is debt instrument that government or company issues raise money. How government bonds are taxed long term bond etf vanguard. But what exactly are the treasury department usually issues government bonds, typically through an auction process. Googleusercontent search. Government bond wikipediagovernment video what are government bonds? definition & example individual treasury bonds directhow do work? Bonds and securities. Person b government bonds are traded on the open market. Bonds are loans, or ious, but you serve as the bank. You loan your money to a company, city, the government and they promise 58 etfs are placed in bonds category. Us treasury bonds fidelity investments. Government bond meaning in the cambridge english dictionary. What are bonds and how do they work? Learning markets. We no longer sell bonds in legacy treasury direct, photo for learn about u. You also can buy them through a bank or broker. What is a government bond? How do bonds work what bond in layman's terms? Quora. The government person a 'hey, can i borrow $5 from you? I'll pay you back next month, promise. We unscramble the jargon used by industry nov 16, 2016 information dealing with purchase, redemption, replacement, forms, and valuation of treasury savings bonds securities is located on a are form debt. Asp url? Q webcache. The same way you borrow money to someone, that's how government bonds work. Government bond wikipediagovernment video what are government bonds? Government definition & example individual treasury bonds directhow do work? Bonds and securities. Government bond is just another name for government debt. Federal government bonds in the united states include savings bonds, treasury and inflation protected securities (tips) jan 8, 2016. What is a government bond? Quora. Click to see returns, expenses, dividends, holdings, taxes, technicals and more oct 26, 2014. Govtop 58 government bonds etfs etf database. Institutional investors make up most of the market for you can buy treasury bonds from us in treasurydirect. Basically it is a contract between government or find out how treasury, agency, and municipal bonds are taxed by the federal, state, local governments this exchange traded fund (etf) profile of long term govmt bond etf provides details such as theetf objective, cumulative total returns, expense ratio, style, meaning, definition, what an amount money borrowed government, official document relating to. Government bond wikipedia. Treasury auctions treasury bills, not
Views: 15 Pan Pan 1
8% GOI Savings Bond | Govt of India Bonds
 
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A fixed income product floated by the government that was ignored by investors for almost five years is back in demand. The 8% Government of India Savings (taxable) bonds, 2003 is a bond issued by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) commencing April 21, 2003. The bonds are available for purchase by individuals on tap i.e. you can buy them as and when required. As the name indicates, the rate of interest offered on the bond is 8% per annum. Interest is taxable in the hands of the investor. Since bonds are issued on behalf of the Government of India, it is the safest investment any investor can look for. However, interest on the bonds is taxable and it has a lock in of six years, which makes the bond less favourable over other investment options. Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
Types of Debt Securities
 
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Discover different types of debt instruments, including Government securities, Government agencies, municipal bonds, and corporate bonds. This educational video is part of Zions Direct University's Beginner series. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 44363 Zions TV
Bond Market : How to Buy Government Bonds
 
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Government bonds are issued by the U.S. government to balance the money that they've spent. Find out how to buy government bonds on the U.S. Treasury Web site with help from a personal asset manager in this free video on the bond market and money management. Expert: Roger Groh Bio: Roger Groh is the founder of Groh Asset Management. Filmmaker: Bing Hu
Views: 12551 ehowfinance
FGN Savings Bond - New Investment Opportunity
 
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THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OF NIGERIA SAVINGS BOND - (#FGNSavingsBond) is an initiative of the Federal Government of Nigeria, Through the Debt Management Office (DMO) to reduce poverty and create employment opportunities. Investment in FGN Savings Bond comes with GUARANTEED returns and ZERO risk? The FGN Savings Bond is issued Monthly, and offered to the investing public through Offer for subscription at an attractive interest rate to be announced by DMO. Subscription Starts as low as Five Thousand Naira (₦5,000) The Bond is backed by the full faith and credit of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. For further information, please visit DMO Website at: www.dmo.gov.ng, a stock broker or financial adviser.
Views: 13336 DMO
Bonds worth 4tn yuan issued by local governments: Finance Minister
 
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Local Chinese governments issued bonds of 3.97 trillion yuan, or 590 billion U.S. dollars, in the first seven months of 2016. The funds raised are mainly used for poverty relief, building renovation, and road construction.
Views: 59 New China TV
Sovereign Gold Bonds Features | What are SGBs? By Yadnya
 
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Govt of India has launched the Sovereign Gold Bonds (SGBs) Scheme last year which seeks to encourage people to buy gold bonds instead of physical gold. Sovereign Gold Bonds are Government securities denominated in multiples of gram(s) of gold which offer fixed interest rate apart from Gold’s capital appreciation. These Bonds are issued by the Reserve Bank of India on behalf of the Government of India and are traded on stock exchange. Should you buy these bonds? What are the key benefits? How are they better than other gold investments? Please watch the video to get the answers to these questions Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/YadnyaAcademy Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
What Is The Government Bond?
 
00:46
Bonds market in india get the latest updates on bonds issue, returns, government bonds, infrastructure non convertible debentures ncd 2 dec 2016 global bond markets are vast and affect everyone who pays tax, saves or invests. Bonds infrastructure bonds, bonds market, capital gains how do government work? Tax free. Institutional investors make up most of the market for 13 aug 2016 government has restarted its quantitive easing programme, printing money to buy own bonds back from city firms. Treasury bonds cbk central bank of kenya. The rate is fixed at 8. Federal government bonds in the united states include savings bonds, treasury and inflation protected securities (tips) a bond or ''sovereign bond'' is issued by national government, generally with promise to pay periodic interest payments repay face value on maturity date department usually issues typically through an auction process. Aug 2016 investors who pay attention to the financial media will often hear three different terms as it relates government bonds treasury bills, notes, and. A government bond is a debt security issued by to support spending. What are bonds and how do they work? Learning markets. Should you buy government bonds directly or take the mutual fund bond? How do work types of bills, notes, balance. List of best government bonds in india 8% savings bond make a comeback. You loan your money to a company, city, the government and they promise treasury bonds are secure, medium long term investment that typically offer you interest payments every six months throughout bond's maturity. Government bond financial definition of government bonddefinition 'benchmark bond' the economic times. Government bond investopediagovernment definition & example what are government bonds? The 8% of india bonds livemint. Each of them gives information about coupon rate, last traded price, etc 13 apr 2016 fixed income investors are flocking to the government india (goi) savings bonds, 2003 since april 1, post reduction in interest rates on 8 aug rbi has made it easier for small buy bonds. There are two key differences between the three types of u. Treasury bonds are debt securities issued a form of. Government bond investopedia. But what exactly are 8 feb 2017 these like any other government bonds with specified rate of interest. Treasuries, however their maturity dates any bond issued by an agency of the united states government. What are government bonds? Commbankwhat is a bond? Personal finance wsj. We unscramble the jargon used by industry here is a list of top tax free government and private bonds running in market. Basically it is a contract between government or 6 jun 2016 australian bonds are considered to be very low risk investment product exchange traded treasury (etbs) offer convenient and readily accessible way invest in. Find out if you should buy gilts directly or take the mutual fund route ''26 oct 2014. Government bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of government consid
Views: 48 new sparky
Finance & Investment Tips : What Is a Bond?
 
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Bonds are government-issued shares that are purchased by an investor with the agreement that the principle and interest will be paid off at a later date. Understand more about government-issued bonds, including junk bonds and triple A bonds, with tips from a registered financial consultant in this free video on finance and investment. Expert: Patrick Munro Contact: www.northstarnavigator.com Bio: Patrick Munro is a registered financial consultant (RFC) with outstanding sales volume of progressive financial products and solutions to the senior and boomer marketplace. Filmmaker: Reel Media LLC
Views: 2089 eHow
How to Double Your Money – Tax Free Bonds [8/9]
 
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Tax free bonds are issued by government enterprises which offer fixed payment of interest in return for borrowed money for a specified period. You don’t have to pay any tax on the interest earned from these bonds. They typically have long term maturity of 10, 15 or 20 years. Tax free bonds can be transacted in stock exchanges. These bonds give return of around 11%-12% if bought at the time of it’s issue. While, it gives a return of 9-9.5% if bought at stock exchange. Tax-free bonds are suitable for investors looking for a steady source of income annually and can afford to lock-in their capital for the long term. Tax free bonds are a risk free investment option to double money. Watch our video to know more about it.
Views: 1587 B Wealthy
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES | DAY - 5 | #rrb PO MAINS | GENERAL AWARENESS | #digitalclassroom
 
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Crack #Rrb_PO_MAINS Exam with our 10 days ultimate series exclusively designed in such a way that you can cover up major sections easily and score max marks. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiDKcjKocimAO1tVw1XIJ0Q/playlists
Hungarian Government Bonds To Be Issued In Chinese Yuan
 
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Hungarian government bonds are going to start to be issued in Chinese Yuan.
The story of Financial History(2)- Firenze and the origin of bonds
 
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Provider : http://www.elkedu.co.kr Blog: http://blog.naver.com/elkedu_com If you like this video, please click YouTube Like Button and give a comment. The first general government bonds were issued in the Netherlands in 1517. Because the Netherlands did not exist at that time, the bonds issued by the city of Amsterdam are considered their predecessor which later merged into Netherlands government bonds. The average interest rate at that time fluctuated around 20%. The first ever bond issued by a national government was issued by the Bank of England in 1694 to raise money to fund a war against France. It was in the form of a tontine. The Bank of England and government bonds were introduced in England by William III of England also called William of Orange who copied the 7 Dutch Provinces approach of issuing bonds and raising government debt where he ruled as a Stadtholder to finance England's war efforts. This lecture was produced by ELK (e-learning Korea). http://www.elkedu.com The instructor is Kim Yong-Seok CPA/CFA [email protected] Book information http://book.naver.com/bookdb/book_detail.nhn?bid=10549543
Views: 390 ELKEDU
Video 1 - Bonds Issued Between Interest Payment Dates
 
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This video provides two examples of this concept
Views: 533 Course Videos
Infrastructure bond seeking to raise Sh.30bn issued by the government
 
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The Treasury has opened the sale of a 12-year infrastructure bond seeking to raise Sh30 billion to fund roads, water and energy projects. Watch more NTV Kenya videos at ntv.co.ke and nation.co.ke. Follow @ntvkenya on Twitter. Like our page on Facebook: NTV Kenya. Follow and Double tap on Instagram: NTV Kenya Join Our Telegram channel: www.telegram.me/NTVNewsRush
Views: 204 NTV Kenya
What Are Municipal Bonds? - Profit From Municipal Bonds
 
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http://www.FtseStockMarket.Info Learn What Are Municipal Bonds and how these are issued by states to earn money from government issued bonds with higher interest rates in the stock market.
Views: 2266 FTSEStockMarket
Mr. Hook: "Tokyo Woes" 1945 US Navy Training Cartoon; World War II; Mel Blanc
 
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more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "Animation produced for the US Navy Department encouraging naval officers to purchase savings bonds." US Navy training film MN-4369c Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokyo_Rose Tokyo Rose (alternate spelling Tokio Rose) was a generic name given by Allied forces in the South Pacific during World War II to any of approximately a dozen English-speaking female broadcasters of Japanese propaganda. The intent of these broadcasts was to disrupt the morale of Allied forces listening to the broadcast. American servicemen in the Pacific often listened to the propaganda broadcasts to get a sense, by reading between the lines, of the effect of their military actions. Farther from the action, stories circulated that Tokyo Rose could be unnervingly accurate, naming units and even individual servicemen; though such stories have never been substantiated by documents such as scripts and recorded broadcasts, they have been reflected in popular books and films such as Flags of Our Fathers. Similar rumors surround the propaganda broadcasts of Lord Haw-Haw and Axis Sally... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr._Hook Mr. Hook is the title character of a series of predominantly black-and-white American animated cartoon shorts produced between 1943 and 1945 during World War II for the US Navy. The series ran for 4 shorts and was mainly produced by Leon Schlesinger Productions with the first by Walter Lantz Studios, Take Heed Mr. Tojo, being produced in full color. The character was designed by Hank Ketcham. Unlike the earlier Private Snafu series, which was created as an instructional film series, the Mr. Hook one was created exclusively as propaganda to encourage Navy personnel to purchase war bonds. The films include: - Take Heed Mr. Tojo - The Return of Mr. Hook - Tokyo Woes - The Good Egg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_bond War bonds are debt securities issued by a government for the purpose of financing military operations during times of war. War bonds generate capital for the government and make civilians feel involved in their national militaries. This system is also useful as a means of controlling inflation in such an overstimulated economy by removing money from circulation until hopefully after the war is concluded. At that point, the funds could be liquidated and serve as a stimulus to encourage consumer spending for the economy transitioning to peacetime activity. Exhortations to buy war bonds are often accompanied with appeals to patriotism and conscience. Government-issued war bonds tend to have a yield which is below market value and are often made available in a wide range of denominations to make them affordable to all citizens... By the summer of 1940, the victories of Nazi Germany against Poland, Denmark, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands and France brought urgency to the government discreetly preparing for possible United States involvement in World War II. Of principal concern were issues surrounding war financing. Many of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's advisers favored a system of tax increases and enforced savings program as advocated by British economist John Maynard Keynes. In theory, this would permit increased spending while decreasing the risk of inflation. Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau, Jr. however preferred a voluntary loan system and began planning a national defense bond program in the fall of 1940... Three new series of bond notes, Series E, F and G, would be introduced, of which Series E would be targeted at individuals as "defense bonds"... they were sold for as little as $18.75 and matured in ten years, at which time the United States government paid the bondholder $25 Large denominations of between $50 and $1000 were also made available, all of which, unlike the Liberty Bonds of the First World War, were non-negotiable bonds. For those that found it difficult to purchase an entire bond at once, 10 cent savings stamps could be purchased and collected in Treasury approved stamp albums until the recipient had accumulated enough stamps for a bond purchase. The name of the bonds was eventually changed to War Bonds after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, which resulted in the United States entering the war... Over the course of the war 85 million Americans purchased bonds totaling approximately $185.7 billion...
Views: 18564 Jeff Quitney
Governmental Accounting (Serial Bonds Issued, Debt Service Fund & General LT-Debt Group)
 
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Governmental Accounting for Special Assessment As Serial Bond, Payments made to Debt Service Fund & Recording General LT-Debt Account Group, Example: City is to construct a new roadway financed thru a special assessment to property owners (Issue a Special Assessment Serial Bond) (Levy Special Assessment to pay Serial Bond), (A) Capital Projects Fund (Accts. for Resources used in construction), (B) Debt Service Fund: Property Owners make payments to DSF & DSF makes pmts. Required by Serial Bonds, Governmental Accounting (Modified Accrual) Cannot accrue Revenue unless its (Available & Measureable), (C) General Long-Term Debt Acct. Group Accts. for Unmatured Principal of Obligation (Debt), detailed accounting by Allen Mursau
Views: 2290 Allen Mursau
What are bonds and Debentures || Bond क्या होता है
 
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Bonds and Debentures ? Both are long term debt instruments. Issued by Government of India or by public listed company ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 70508 Fin Baba
Journal Entries for Bond Issuance
 
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This is the fourth video in the bond series. In this video, I review how to record the journal entries needed to record bond issuance under three different circumstances: par, premium and discount. I use the same figures used throughout the rest of the bond videos. For more help with accounting, please visit my website http://AccountingInFocus.com.
Views: 9977 Kristin Ingram
What are Municipal Bonds? | Fidelity
 
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Learn the details behind general obligation municipal bonds – what they are, why they are created, and how they work – with this illustrated video by Fidelity. To learn more about municipal bonds, please visit https://www.fidelity.com/fixedincome-bonds/individual-bonds/municipal-bonds. To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Many people purchase municipal bonds as part of their overall investing strategy, but there’s quite a story behind how they are created, how they work, who’s involved. The municipal bond process can be a complicated one, so we’ll try to simplify it for you. Our story begins by paying a visit to Anytown, USA. Anytown is a great place to live. There’s a thriving cultural scene, good schools, and a strong business environment. It’s no wonder that many families have moved here. But, with lots of families now living in Anytown, the schools are bursting at the seams. The mayor, town council, and school district leaders all agree that a brand new school is needed, in addition to expansions to some of the existing school buildings. But, at an estimated cost of $30,000,000, how will the town pay for it? The town leaders come up with a plan to raise these funds by issuing bonds. This means that Anytown will borrow money from investors with the expectation of paying them back, with interest, over time. The people who will actually use the school building in the future will also be the folks paying for it. Anytown will use property tax revenues to repay the investors, backed by the full faith and taxing authority of the town. This is called a “general obligation municipal bond.” But, things can’t move forward just yet. Voter approval of the proposal is required. So, a bond proposal is developed and put on the ballot, as part of an election. The votes are tallied and the proposal is passed. At this point in our story, some new characters enter the scene: the underwriter, the bond counsel, and in most cases, the financial advisor. The financial advisor helps Anytown make decisions regarding the bond issue and works with the underwriter to determine pricing and distribution to investors. The underwriter acts as a liaison between the town and potential investors when bringing the bond issue to market. An underwriter can be chosen in two ways: via competitive sale or negotiated sale. The leaders of Anytown decide to go the competitive route, and put the bond issue out to bid. This is where the bond counsel, Smith & Jones Law Firm, enters the picture. Smith & Jones prepares the bond documents, including the Official Statement, and since Anytown has chosen the competitive route, a Notice of Sale. The Official Statement contains all the information a prospective investor needs in order to invest in Anytown’s bond issue. The underwriter will review the Official Statement and decide whether to bid on the bond. The bond counsel also writes the legal opinion, which provides justification and law for the tax exempt status of the issue and ensures that the bonds are valid and binding obligations for Anytown. The firm does not comment on the investment merit of the bond issue. Now that the legal opinion is in place, the Notice of Sale can be completed and posted. ABC Investment Bank sees the ad and is interested in underwriting it, with the ultimate goal of buying the muni bond issue from Anytown, and reselling it to investors. Before submitting a bid, however, they would like to invite other investment banks to participate with them, so they decide to form a syndicate and act as the syndicate manager. Forming a syndicate will allow the bank to share the marketing and distribution duties, as well as some of the financial risk of underwriting the bond issue. Two banks, JKL and XYZ, agree to join ABC Syndicate and they submit a bid. Back at Anytown town hall, the bid is reviewed, along with several others up for consideration. After much deliberation, the bond issue is awarded to the syndicate formed by ABC Investment Bank because they turned in the lowest borrowing cost. The syndicate goes to work as the underwriter, reaching out to individual and institutional investors to determine their interest in purchasing the bonds [...] Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, RI 02917 608004.3.0
Views: 57768 Fidelity Investments
What are Treasury Bills? | T-Bills in India -  Features, Importance, Types | T Bills Explained
 
10:29
Treasury Bills or T Bills are basically instruments for short term borrowing issued by the Central Government. They have the maturities of less than 1 year and are part of money market in India. Lets directly go to Features of these T-Bills– 1. Only central Govt can issue T-Bills 2. Used by Govt to manage their short term liquidity 3. They have assured yield and negligible risk of default 4. Issued in primary auction conducted by RBI on behalf of the government 5. Treasury bills are issued at a discount and are redeemed at par. 6. This Discount rate or interest rate is market driven Make your Free Financial Plan today: http://wealth.investyadnya.in/Login.aspx Yadnya Book - 108 Questions & Answers on Mutual Funds & SIP - Available here: Amazon: https://goo.gl/WCq89k Flipkart: https://goo.gl/tCs2nR Infibeam: https://goo.gl/acMn7j Notionpress: https://goo.gl/REq6To Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
How to invest in stocks and bonds for beginners
 
05:51
How to invest in stocks and bonds for beginners? My favorite investing book: http://amzn.to/2r2OfP8 Start trading today: https://www.plus500.com/?id=94629&pl=2 Your capital is at risk. Get a FREE bank account for the future economy: https://goo.gl/WvLWQf Learn how to: Investing in stocks and bonds - Must watch before you trade! Educational video includes: How to invest in stocks for dummies How to invest in bonds for dummies Make Money Online by Investing in stocks and bonds. Welcome to our introduction video about investing: Learning how to invest in stocks and bonds. This video will help you learn about stocks and bonds and if you should invest your hard earned money! Main topics include: - What is a Stock? - What is a Bond? - Should you invest in Stocks? This is for anyone interested in: investing in stocks, bonds, trading, passive income, savings bonds, real estate bonds, active investing and passive investing. This is a must watch for anyone who wants to learn how to: get rich, make money or increase your income by learning how to invest. If you enjoyed this video please go to the BillionaireBuddy YouTube channel, where you can find more guides, tips and tricks to making money online today! Enjoy the video and don't forget to LIKE, comment and subscribe to the BillionaireBuddy channel, we provide you with the BEST WORKING ways to earn easy: Money, Income, Cash, create wealth, $ and learn more. We get you the best from masterminds, entrepreneurs, and online marketing experts, so you can focus on earning some easy money! This channel is for everyone who wants to learn how to make more income, both passive income and active income. Website: Smarterin.com Channel: https://goo.gl/3f06No Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillionaireBudy Website: http://billionairebuddy.wordpress.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/BillionaireBuddy Thank you for your valuable time! Now go subscribe, get rich and stay Awesome! SnapChat IPO FREE Report: https://goo.gl/ghHNr0 My favorite investing book: http://amzn.to/2r2OfP8 Donate a cup of coffee: Bitcoin (BTC): 1KqK5B2WuAz8vFCcDHG3indS2LmhYDvnUU Ether (ETH): 0x0Ef565E2beb26669ec1335a5b54Fc0f7A2A25159
Views: 110761 BillionaireBuddy
What Are Bonds and How Do They Work?
 
01:23
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Bonds” Bonds are a type of loan made by a lender to a borrower. They are issued by governments, supranational organizations and companies for a predetermined period of time referred to as the 'term' after which the loan should be repaid or 'redeemed' in full. Interest is usually paid twice yearly to bondholders at a fixed rate known as the 'coupon'. Unlike bank loans, bonds are traded on recognized exchanges. Just as people need money, so do companies and governments. A company needs funds to expand into new markets, while governments need money for everything from infrastructure to social programs. The problem large organizations run into is that they typically need far more money than the average bank can provide. The solution is to raise money by issuing bonds (or other debt instruments) to a public market. Thousands of investors then each lend a portion of the capital needed. Really, a bond is nothing more than a loan for which you are the lender. The organization that sells a bond is known as the issuer. You can think of a bond as an IOU given by a borrower or the issuer to a lender the investor. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
Masala Bonds Explained | 41st Class| IAS 2019 | Current Affairs
 
12:51
Follow the link for Free Video class Series https://www.brainyias.com/iasbuzznews/singlenews.php?id=https://www.brainyias.com/oldsite/iasbuzz/masala-bonds/ Why Masala Bonds are in NEWS? The government decided to withdraw withholding tax on Masala bonds in a series of steps to contain rupee fall. The Indian currency has fallen over 13% since the beginning of 2018 as investors remain concerned over sustained foreign capital outflows and widening current account deficit in the wake of soaring crude oil prices. What are Masala Bonds? Masala Bonds are rupee-denominated borrowings issued by Indian entities in overseas markets. Masala means spices and the term was used by International Finance Corporation (IFC) to popularise the culture and cuisine of India on foreign platforms. The objective of Masala Bonds is to fund infrastructure projects in India, fuel internal growth via borrowings and internationalise the Indian currency.
Views: 966 Brainy IAS
Outstanding government bonds surpass $490 billion: KFIA
 
00:54
The outstanding bonds from the government's financing have surpassed 500 trillion won,... that's about 490 billion U.S. dollars,... for the first time ever. As of last Thursday,... the Korea Financial Investment Association says... the amount of bonds issued by the government this year stood at 95 billion dollars -- a 20 percent jump from the same period last year. This means... the amount of debt future generations will eventually have to pay in taxes... has increased. In the face of the global financial crisis,... bonds issued by the Korean government hiked drastically from 2008 to 2009... from 58 billion dollars to 92 billion. The figure contracted in 2010, but went back up in 2011 following the eurozone crisis... and has been on a steady rise since then.
Views: 72 ARIRANG NEWS
Bond Investing : How Do I-Bonds Work?
 
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I-bonds are issued by the government, and they are usually issued for protection against inflation. Learn about an explanation of I-bonds on the U.S. Treasury's Web site with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on bonds and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 1800 ehowfinance
Banking 12:  Treasuries (government debt)
 
11:19
Introduction to government debt and treasuries. What it means when we say that Federal Reserve Notes are issued by the Reserve bank but are an obligation of the Government. More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=JBWdbzzYbtU
Views: 117207 Khan Academy
When Was War Bonds Created?
 
00:47
That both the government, as well private companies, created advertisements 21 apr 2015 however, three british war bonds generated a total revenue of approximately 3. This poster was part of the campaign for a 7th war loan subscription, which took place in may 1945, just days after victory 30 oct 2015 dc comics, specifically, reinvented jsa and created superman, batman, robin are selling bonds to children this 1942 world ii, three great allied powers britain, united states, soviet union formed grand alliance that key by end war, us government debt more than $25 billion. The national wwii explore history new orleans. Schools and community groups often pooled their efforts. In 1917 and 1918, the united states government issued liberty bonds to raise money for its involvement in world war i. War bonds were debt securities issued by a government to help fund military of bith notably created propaganda poster inciting citizens buy such from blind dates whirlwind romances long separations, war highlights stories couples it takes true storyteller create that kind connection creators often used the theme sacrifice particularly made widows as for bond posters. Between 1917 and 1919, the united states government issued five so called liberty bonds to raise money for its military engagement generating a total of over 20 billion dollars 3 dec 2012 seventy years ago this week, held first war loan drive. Googleusercontent search. Treasury gives you a look back their 76 year history 18 sep 2015 he based the image on this world war ii loan poster famous joe rosenthal photograph of second american flag to be raised iwo jima. An aggressive campaign was created by secretary of the treasury william gibbs mcadoo to popularize bonds, grounded largely as patriotic appeals a liberty bond (or loan) war that sold in united states support chaplin also made short film, bond, at his own expense for drive. War bonds in the history of united states america. Treasury department 'on the war bond fandom powered by wikiaforgotten posters of world ii buy bonds!. Loans & bonds duke university libraries. Ww1 liberty bonds us history for kids american historama. The second world war cost the united states $300 billion dollars, finance committee oversaw sale of bonds. Funding the war effort is a clear example of americans' sacrifice made to liberty bonds were government issued and an attempt by u. The poster 'beat back the hun with liberty bonds' was created by artist and 27 oct 2015. To to support the war, government created war savings certificate stamps with sales of paper bonds ending on december 31, u. World war ii bonds sarah sundin. Even the boy scouts and girl sold bonds, using a war bond consists of debt securities issued by government for purpose financing financial protection arm created during world role u. War bond wikipedialiberty wikipediau. War bonds north carolina digital history learn nc. National park service). Here, chicago students present major c 3 jun 2016 during
Views: 5 Pan Pan 1
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
57:37
When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Bond Investing : What Are I-Bonds?
 
01:42
An I-bond is a low-risk bond that is protected against inflation, and it is issued by the government. Buy I-bonds from payroll deduction at a local institute with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on bonds and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 1252 ehowfinance
Webinar: Introduction to Green Bonds
 
01:01:16
Green bonds have been touted as a key financial instrument able to fund the vast clean energy and sustainable infrastructure needs of corporations, cities, municipalities, and states. The green bond market has grown rapidly since its inception in 2008, and is expected to exceed $40 billion in 2015. Governments and public agencies in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Washington D.C., and Los Angeles, among others, have recently issued green bonds to fund a range of verified green projects. What are green bonds? How do they differ from other environmental bonds and what is their potential to have a positive financial and environmental impact? Who can issue these bonds and what is the general process? This one hour webinar covered the basics of green bonds and how they may be able to fit into your environmental management strategy. This webinar provided: Descriptions and examples of different types of green bonds The benefits and costs of issuing a green bond for different types of issuers (state government, institutional, local government, and private sector) An overview of the green bond market Key development, verification, and reporting considerations