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Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 235192 Khan Academy
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 494270 Khan Academy
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 36767 tutor2u
Bond Price and Bond Yields - Simplified | Money and Banking Part 3.1 | Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
Should You Buy into the Bond Market? Government Bonds? Corporate Bonds?
 
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Stock Market Mastery Course: http://bit.ly/2hurfQO Wealth Accelerator Course: http://bit.ly/2qxfONO Podcast: http://chapplerei.com/buy-bond-market/ Sorry, no business news today! (I am a little busy today), so here is a super interesting video on the bond market! Should you buy government bonds? Corporate bonds? Are bonds right for you? In my opinion, bonds are for people that need a guaranteed income. This is generally older people, people who cant work etc. The Yields are low and so is the risk.  My Favourite 'Mindset' Book: http://amzn.to/2slhmKD A Book for Motivation: http://amzn.to/2slEbOz My Favourite Book on Stocks (In 2017): http://amzn.to/2uktY6k The Most Important Book I've Ever Read: http://amzn.to/2tLQ2tF A Book Influenced my Investing Strategy and Business Strategy: http://amzn.to/2tl44iw My Camera That I Use: http://amzn.to/2slFwEO Arguably My Favourite All-Around Read: http://amzn.to/2ukUwV8 Website! http://chapplerei.com (under construction) On Instagram! https://instagram.com/jack_chapple_real/ On Vine! https://vine.co/u/1176331971736293376 On Twitter! https://twitter.com/JackChappleSci On Faceook! https://www.facebook.com/ChappleREI/
Views: 13272 Jack Chapple
Fiscal Policy: Introduction to Bond Markets and Interest Rate Determination
 
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One of the least understood topics among introductory Econ students is how bond markets work. This video lesson introduces the bond market, and explains how the demand for a government's debt is an important determination of the borrowing costs faced by that government. We will answer some important questions about bond markets, such as, "What's the relationship between bond prices and bond yields?" and "How could budget deficits and debt affect interest rates?" In the next video we'll examine circumstances under which large budget deficits and national debt may NOT drive up a government's borrowing costs. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 12084 Jason Welker
Bonds (Corporate Bonds, Municipal Bonds, Government Bonds, etc.) Explained in One Minute
 
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Whether we're talking about corporate bonds, municipal bonds, government bonds or other types of bonds, the principle is simple: an entity requests a loan and a lender is willing to offer money to the entity in question in exchange for interest (although in our current low to zero to negative interest environment, that part is debatable). Through this one minute video, I've explained how the process works. Please like, comment and subscribe if you've enjoyed the video. To support the channel, give me a minute (see what I did there?) of your time by visiting OneMinuteEconomics.com and reading my message. Bitcoin donations can be sent to 1AFYgM8Cmiiu5HjcXaP5aS1fEBJ5n3VDck and PayPal donations to [email protected], any and all support is greatly appreciated! Oh and I've also started playing around with Patreon, my link is: https://www.patreon.com/oneminuteeconomics Interested in reading a good book? My first book, Wealth Management 2.0 (through which I do my best to help people manage their wealth properly, whether we're talking about someone who has a huge amount of money at his disposal or someone who is still living paycheck to paycheck), can be bought using the links below: Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Wealth-Management-2-0-Financial-Professionals-ebook/dp/B01I1WA2BK Barnes & Noble - http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/wealth-management-20-andrei-polgar/1124435282?ean=2940153328942 iBooks (Apple) - https://itun.es/us/wYSveb.l Kobo - https://store.kobobooks.com/en-us/ebook/wealth-management-2-0 My second book, the Wall Street Journal and USA Today bestseller The Age of Anomaly (through which I help people prepare for financial calamities and become more financially resilient in general), can be bought using the links below. Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/Age-Anomaly-Spotting-Financial-Uncertainty-ebook/dp/B078SYL5YS Barnes & Noble - https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-age-of-anomaly-andrei-polgar/1127084693?ean=2940155383970 iBooks (Apple) - https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/age-anomaly-spotting-financial-storms-in-sea-uncertainty/id1331704265 Kobo - https://www.kobo.com/ww/en/ebook/the-age-of-anomaly-spotting-financial-storms-in-a-sea-of-uncertainty Last but not least, if you'd like to follow me on social media, use one of the links below: https://www.facebook.com/oneminuteeconomics https://twitter.com/andreipolgar https://ro.linkedin.com/in/andrei-polgar-9a11a561
Views: 39758 One Minute Economics
Bonds and Bond Yields
 
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Bonds and Bond Yields. A video covering Bonds and Bond Yields Instagram @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 24440 EconplusDal
What Is A Bond? 📈 BONDS FOR BEGINNERS!
 
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FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM FOR DAILY MOTIVATIONAL CONTENT ✔️ @ryanscribnerofficial _______ Ready to start investing? 🤔💸 WEBULL: "Get a FREE STOCK worth up to $1000." 💰 http://ryanoscribner.com/webull BETTERMENT: "Passive investing, they manage everything for you." 📈 http://ryanoscribner.com/betterment FUNDRISE: "Passive real estate investing, 8 to 11% returns." 🏠 http://ryanoscribner.com/fundrise M1 FINANCE: "Invest in partial shares of stocks like Amazon." 📌 http://ryanoscribner.com/m1-finance LENDING CLUB: "Become the bank and make interest on loans." 🏦 http://ryanoscribner.com/lending-club COINBASE: "Get $10 in free Bitcoin (when you fund $100)." ⭐ http://ryanoscribner.com/coinbase _______ Want more Ryan Scribner? 🙌 MY INVESTING BLOG ▶︎ https://investingsimple.blog/ FREE INVESTING COURSE ▶︎ http://ryanoscribner.com/free-course FACEBOOK GROUP FOR ENTREPRENEURS ▶︎ https://www.facebook.com/groups/164766680793265/ COURSE CREATION COMPANION ▶︎ http://ryanoscribner.com/course-creation-companion LIKE MY FACEBOOK PAGE ▶︎ https://www.facebook.com/ryanoscribner/ PASSIVE INCOME MASTERCLASS LIVE EVENTS ▶︎ http://ryanoscribner.com/passive-income _______ Premium Educational Programs 🧐 PRIVATE STOCK MARKET INVESTING SITE 📊 http://ryanoscribner.com/stock-radar STOCK MARKET INVESTING COURSE 📈 http://ryanoscribner.com/stock-market-investing-course _______ Ready to keep learning? 🤔📚 My Favorite Personal Finance Book 📘 https://amzn.to/2NiyDiz My Favorite Investing Book 📗 https://amzn.to/2KEyd7D My 2nd Favorite Investing Book 📗 https://amzn.to/2tZmxBU My Favorite Personal Development Book 📕 https://amzn.to/2KJKgRn Not a fan of reading? Join Audible and get two free audio books! ❌📚 http://ryanoscribner.com/audible _______ DISCLAIMER: I am not a financial adviser. These videos are for educational purposes only. Investing of any kind involves risk. While it is possible to minimize risk, your investments are solely your responsibility. It is imperative that you conduct your own research. I am merely sharing my opinion with no guarantee of gains or losses on investments. AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE: I am affiliated with a number of the offerings on this channel. This includes the links above under "Ready To Start Investing" as well as other influencers I bring on the channel. This also includes the use of Amazon affiliate links. (Send me something) Scribner Media LLC PO Box 641 Ballston Spa, NY 12020
Views: 31875 Ryan Scribner
Bonds: Spot Rates vs. Yield to Maturity
 
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What's the difference between a spot rate and a bond's yield-to-maturity? In this video you'll learn how to find the price of the bond using spot rates, as well as how to find the yield-to-maturity of a bond once we know it's price. Simply put, spot rates are used to discount cash flows happening at a particular point in time, back to time 0. A bond's yield-to-maturity is the overall return that the investor will make by purchasing the bond - think of it as a weighted average!
Views: 2537 Arnold Tutoring
The information hidden in the prices of UK government bonds
 
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UK government bonds, known as “Gilts”, are financial borrowing instruments that the government uses to finance the deficit, the difference between government spending and tax receipts. Over the last 30 years, this market has undergone many changes, responding both to technological advances and to economic circumstances. At the same time, rapid developments in financial economic theory have greatly enhanced the understanding of how financial market prices reflect economic conditions. In this lecture, Professor Steeley will explore how mathematical and statistical techniques have been developed and applied to UK bond prices to provide greater insight into current economic conditions and likely future economic conditions. These techniques also reveal the resilience of the market to its structural changes in the recent past, to the fall-out from financial crises, and to its recent experience as the means to undertake quantitative easing. Professor Jim Steeley re-joined Keele in January 2016, as Professor of Finance. Prior to this, he was the Lloyds Bank Chair and Professor of Finance at Aston Business School and before that, Professor of Finance at the University of Stirling. Earlier in my career, he held academic positions at Cardiff Business School and Keele University, where he was the first appointment in the field of financial markets. During the mid- 1990s he worked for the Bank of England, where I managed a research team developing techniques to interpret financial market prices for use in monetary policy advice, and techniques to improve the pricing of UK government debt issues. He has been a visitor at many other universities, including the Financial Markets Group at the London School of Economics, the Isaac Newton Institute of Mathematical Sciences at Cambridge University, the Technical University of Ostrava in the Czech Republic, Washington University in St. Louis, Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Kent State University in Ohio and the University of Central Florida in Orlando. Professor Steeley’s research is in the areas of financial markets and investments, with a long standing interest in the estimation and modelling of the interest rates implicit in UK government bonds prices, and in the modelling of the effects of exogenous and endogenous changes in the microstructure of this market. He has also undertaken research on each of equity, futures and options markets, with a particular emphasis on the dynamic properties of the market prices and the information revealed by these dynamics. He also has an active research programme in the area of financial market microstructure looking at information aggregation, the measurement and pricing of liquidity and the effects of investor behaviours. His research has been published in leading academic journals in Finance and Economics, including the Journal of Finance, the Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, the Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, the Journal of Banking and Finance and the Journal of International Money and Finance. He has made numerous presentations of his research at leading international conferences including the American Finance Association and the Royal Economic Society. I am on the editorial board of the academic journals Studies in Economics and Finance and the International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance. I am also on the editorial board of the research section of the Securities and Investments Review, which is the quarterly journal of the Chartered Institute of Securities and Investments. In 2014 I was elected to the executive committee of the Conference of Professors in Accounting and Finance. In 2015, he was awarded a Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.
Views: 509 Keele University
Bond Market : How to Buy Government Bonds
 
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Government bonds are issued by the U.S. government to balance the money that they've spent. Find out how to buy government bonds on the U.S. Treasury Web site with help from a personal asset manager in this free video on the bond market and money management. Expert: Roger Groh Bio: Roger Groh is the founder of Groh Asset Management. Filmmaker: Bing Hu
Views: 12837 ehowfinance
Bonds vs. stocks | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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The difference between a bond and a stock. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/shorting-stock/v/basic-shorting?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/stocks-intro-tutorial/v/what-it-means-to-buy-a-company-s-stock?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Many people own stocks, but, unfortunately, most of them don't really understand what they own. This tutorial will keep you from being one of those people (not keep you from owning stock, but keep you from being ignorant about your investments). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 883578 Khan Academy
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 480340 Khan Academy
How Bond Market works? | Understanding Debt Market with example | Bond Market in India - Part 1
 
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The bond market moves when expectations change about economic growth and inflation. Unlike stocks, whose future earnings are anyone's guess, bonds make fixed payments for a certain period of time. Investors decide how much to pay for a given bond based on how much they expect inflation to erode the value of those fixed payments. The higher their expectations of inflation, the less they will pay for bonds. The lower they expect inflation to be, the more they will pay. In Bond market, lower prices correspond to higher yields, and higher prices correspond to lower yields. When prices fall, yields rise, and vice versa. Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
Corp Bonds, Government Bonds or Treasury Bills
 
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Disclosure - Government bonds and Treasury Bills are guaranteed by the US Government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. The market value of corporate bonds will fluctuate, and if the bond is sold prior to maturity, the investor's yield may differ from the advertised yield. Corporate bonds are subject to the default risk of the issuer. Daniel Romero, Melissa Levin and Greg Levin are Registered Representatives with and offer Securities & fee based asset management through LPL Financial a Registered Investment Advisor and Member FINRA/SIPC. Daniel's CA Insurance Lic #:OC54180 - Melissa's CA Insurance Lic #:0C56086 - Greg's CA Insurance Lic #:0F08519 Click on my web link for a list of states I'm licensed. www.DanRomero.com LPL Tracking #602008
Views: 487 Dan Romero
Short Term High Yield Bonds
 
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The current low interest rate environment means that bond investors have to take more risk in order to gain an attractive return on their invested money. The current low interest rates also present a risk that if interest rates and inflation rise in the future, then bond prices may fall and portfolios could suffer losses.
Views: 7130 hubbis
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 347493 Khan Academy
Bond Market : How to Make Money Buying Bonds
 
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There are two components to making money in the bond market, including being safe and paying attention to bonds that do well when interest rates are falling. Learn how bonds fall in price when interest rates go up with help from a personal asset manager in this free video on the bond market and money management. Expert: Roger Groh Bio: Roger Groh is the founder of Groh Asset Management. Filmmaker: Bing Hu
Views: 12568 ehowfinance
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 72876 Investopedia
Bonds Explained for Beginners | Bond Trading 101
 
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Earn up to 1 Year Free: https://bit.ly/2oul70h Free Resources: https://bit.ly/2wymZbJ A bond is a type of loan issued to some type of entity such as a business or government by an investor. It’s similar to borrowing money from a lender if you’ve ever purchased a home or car before. Sometimes businesses need more money than the banks will offer them, so they issue bonds as a way to raise more capital. Governments can also issue bonds when they need more money for things like roads or parks. Bonds are considered safer on the risk spectrum for investments, but they also typically carry a lower return. Benjamin Graham, author of the intelligent investor and Warren Buffets mentor, recommends holding a portfolio of 75% stocks and 25% bonds during a bull market and 75% bonds and 25% stocks during a bear market. As opposed to other investments which are considered equity, bonds are considered debt which means that if a company goes under, it must repay all bondholders before stockholders. This is due to the fixed interest nature of the bond. When the investor purchases a bond at what’s called the face value, they are paid interest, known as the coupon or yield. The reason it’s referred to as coupon is because back when bonds were actually paper, investors would physically have to clip coupons to redeem their interest. Anyway, the investor is paid a coupon on the bond until the loan is fully paid back by the issuer. This is known as the maturity date. Interest payment frequency and the maturity date is determined prior to the purchase of the bond. For example, if I purchase a $1,000, 3-year bond with a 5% coupon, I know I’ll receive $50 in interest each year for 3 years. Now it’s important to note that Bonds can vary in risk and return A AAA bond is the best bond you can buy while a Ba bond and lower are more speculative and are known as Junk bonds When it comes to bonds, the higher the return, the higher the risk. The lower the return, the lower the risk. Bonds with a longer maturity date are also riskier and carry a higher return. Typically government bonds will be safer than corporate bonds. When it comes to taxation, corporate bonds are taxed regularly while some bonds like municipal and other government bonds are tax-exempt. A bond can also be secured or unsecured With an unsecured bond, you may lose all of your investment if the company fails while with a secured bond, the company pledges specific assets to give shareholders if they fail to repay their bonds. Although bonds are considered a “safer” investment, they still do come with risks. When you purchase a bond, interest rates are out of your control and may fluctuate. Interest rates are controlled by the U.S. treasury, the federal reserve, and the banking industry. This means that if specified in your agreement, the company may be able to issue a call provision which is an early redemption of the bond. While not always the case, companies will take advantage of lower interest rates to pay back loans early. This leaves you with a lower return than what you expected. Bonds are also inversely proportional to interest rates so when interest rates go up, bonds go down and vice versa. Bonds can also be traded between investors prior to its maturity date. A bond that’s traded below the market value is said to be trading at a discount while a bond trading for more than it’s face value is trading at a premium. Bonds can be a great way to diversify your investment portfolio, however, they can also be quite complex. You can use investment platforms like Fidelity, E-Tade, or Charles Shwabb to learn more about specific types of bonds. For today’s video, we will be using Fidelity. Social Links: Website: http://www.wharmstrong.com Twitter: http://bit.ly/2DBEhdz Facebook: http://bit.ly/2F5uB8a Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wharmstrong1/ Disclaimer: Nothing published on my channel should be considered personal investment advice. Although I do discuss various types of investments and strategies, I am not a licensed professional. Please invest responsibly. This post contains affiliate links
Views: 358 Will Armstrong
Bond Market Collapse 2018: Do Not Buy Bonds! // crash bubble sell off coming explained
 
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Bond Market Collapse 2018: Do Not Buy Bonds! // crash bubble sell off coming explained // Contact davidmoadel @ gmail . com for more help. // Here are some free reports with research on what's going on in the markets and potential ways to get better yield: Bonds Report: http://www.portfoliowealthglobal.com/bonds Cash Flow Report: http://www.portfoliowealthglobal.com/cashflow Gold Report: http://www.portfoliowealthglobal.com/goldplaybook Zinc Riches Report: http://www.portfoliowealthglobal.com/zincriches Market Crash Report: http://www.portfoliowealthglobal.com/crash All Reports on One Page: http://www.portfoliowealthglobal.com/money Subscribe to my YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUoWjpemcumDyh95Z9KPEdA?sub_confirmation=1 Plenty of stock / options / finance education videos here: https://davidmoadel.blogspot.com/ Disclaimer: I am not licensed or registered to provide financial or investment advice. My videos, presentations, and writing are only for entertainment purposes, and are not intended as investment advice. I cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided. marijuana stocks to buy now Cannabis hemp weed pot 2017 canada stocks to buy now, penny stocks strategies, marijuana stocks to buy, marijuana stocks to buy now, marijuana stocks to invest in, marijuana stocks brokers, marijuana stocks canada, cannabis stocks, hemp stocks, pot stocks, weed stocks, marijuana stocks list, medical marijuana stocks, marijuana stocks on robinhood, marijuana penny stocks, penny stock broker, best penny stock broker, Trading and Investing Options and Stocks, Medical Marijuana Investment, Make Money in Stocks, OTC stocks, Strategy for trading or investment, mj stocks retail stock investments, retail stock investor, stock market investing tips, jc penny stock, macys stock, uvxy stock, vxx stock, tvix stock, retail sector investing, FIT GPRO TGT COST M RAD volatility investing, retail sector trading, stock market experts, stock market interview, Stock market volatility lessons for better trading, UVXY VXX TVIX trading options 101, vix trading, vix index, vix volatility, uvxy trading, uvxy stock, uvxy options, uvxy explained, uvxy technical analysis, market volatility, stock market volatility, stock volatility, vix trading strategies, trading vix options, trading vix futures, trading the vix, tvix stock, tvix explained, vxx trading, vxx stock, vxx etf, vxx options, vxx explained, xiv stock, options volatility, options volatility trading, options implied volatility, market volatility explained, shorting the vix, day trading, day trader, day trading strategies, day trading for beginners, day trading stocks, day trading penny stocks, day trading live, day trading setup, day trading academy, day trading options, day trading for dummies, day trading for a living, day trading basics, day trading 101, how to day trade, how to day trade for beginners, how to day trade stocks, how to day trade penny stocks, how to day trade options, how to day trade for beginners, day trader interview, options trading for beginners stock market for beginners stocks for beginners stock investing stock market investing options trading strategies stock trading strategies stock investing penny stocks penny stock trading nasdaq apple twitter education rsi bollinger bands $SPY $QQQ $AAPL $TWTR SPY QQQ AAPL TWTR forex david moadel trading traders investing investors stock charts MJNA HEMP TRTC AGTK terra tech agritek VAPE MNTR ERBB AMMJ USMJ
Views: 2915 David Moadel
What are government bonds? | IG Explainers
 
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Learn all about government bonds: including what they are, how they work, and why they move in price. ► Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/IGUnitedKingdom?sub_confirmation=1 ► Learn more: https://www.ig.com/uk/bonds/what-are-government-bonds Twitter: https://twitter.com/IGcom Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IGcom LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/igcom Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iggroup.android.cfd&hl=en_GB We provide fast and flexible access to over 10,000 financial markets – including indices, shares, forex, commodities – through our award-winning range of platforms and apps. Established in 1974 as the world’s first financial spread betting firm, we’re now the world’s No.1 provider of CFDs and spread betting* and a global leader in forex. We also offer an execution-only share dealing service in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria and the Netherlands. Through our low fees and smart price-sourcing technology, we help traders keep their costs down. All trading involves risk. Spread bets and CFDs are leveraged products and can result in losses that exceed deposits. The value of shares, ETFs and ETCs bought through a share dealing account can fall as well as rise. Please take care to manage your exposure. * For CFDs, based on revenue excluding FX, published financial statements, October 2016; number of active UK financial spread betting accounts (Investment Trends UK Leveraged Trading Report released June 2017); for forex based on number of primary relationships with FX traders (Investment Trends UK Leveraged Trading Report released June 2017)
Views: 1913 IG UK
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
How bonds work
 
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Investing can sometimes seem like either like a gamble or very dull. At the "gambling" end of the spectrum are shares, with the possibility of swift ups in price and swift drops in price. At the other end is cash in the bank -- a predictable investment with few changes day-to-day or month-on-month. Investors looking for a middle ground and looking to diversify do have other options. They can consider bonds. Bonds are something of a mystery to many people -- perhaps because they are not often talked about. But bonds can play an important role in managing investments. They can be a half way house between the risk of shares and property and the safety of cash. How do bonds work? At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Or, more technically, it is a large loan that has been split into packages and sold to investors. Bond holders typically make money by receiving regular payments of interest (known as coupons) during the life of the loan. When the loan ends, their original investment is returned. Bonds may have lives of just a year or two or for 10, 20 or even 30 years. You can buy individual bonds or opt for units in a bond fund run by an asset manager. Like shares, bonds or bond funds can usually be sold at any time and the value of your investment may rise or fall. But bond prices usually move less than shares. That is why they are considered safer than shares but they are more risky than a bank deposit. The original investment and the coupon payments are secure for bonds, while with shares, there is no guarantee of receiving dividend payments -- or your original investment. Looking a bit more closely, there are two main types of bonds -- corporate bonds and government bonds. Corporate bonds are loans made by companies. Government bonds are loans made by governments. Corporate bonds are more risky because the company issuing the bond may go bankrupt. In bankruptcy, though, bond holders are paid before shareholders. Governments rarely go bankrupt so government bonds are safer than corporate bonds. And the lower interest rate on government bonds reflects this. Getting more technical, different types of bonds are designed to work in different financial conditions. In particular, index-linked bonds pay coupons and the original investment in a way that compensates for inflation. The can be attractive to investors who want to ensure the value of their investment does not fall if prices rise. Bonds don't have to be part of your investment portfolio. Some people are happy to invest exclusively in shares and property but if you want to spread your investment risk, if you want to diversify, remember that there is always a half way house in bonds.
Views: 86849 ING eZonomics
Khan Academy - Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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Khan Academy on Bond Prices and Interest Rates
Views: 149400 Jonathan Horn
Dave Explains Why He Doesn't Recommend Bonds
 
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Learn to budget, beat debt, & build a legacy. Visit the online store today: https://goo.gl/GjPwhe Subscribe to stay up to date with the latest videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/DaveRamseyShow?sub_confirmation=1 Welcome to The Dave Ramsey Show like you've never seen it before. The show live streams on YouTube M-F 2-5pm ET! Watch Dave live in studio every day and see behind-the-scenes action from Dave's producers. Watch video profiles of debt-free callers and see them call in live from Ramsey Solutions. During breaks, you'll see exclusive content from people like Rachel Cruze, and Chris Hogan, Christy Wright and Chris Brown —as well as all kinds of other video pieces that we'll unveil every day. The Dave Ramsey Show channel will change the way you experience one of the most popular radio shows in the country!
Views: 146984 The Dave Ramsey Show
The basics of bonds - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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In his latest video tutorial, MoneyWeek’s former deputy editor Tim Bennett explains the basics of bonds – what they are and how they work. Visit http://moneyweek.com/youtube for extra videos not found on YouTube. MoneyWeek videos are designed to help you become a better investor, and to give you a better understanding of the markets. They’re aimed at both beginners and more experienced investors. In all our videos we explain things in an easy-to-understand way. Some videos are about important ideas and concepts. Others are about investment stories and themes in the news. The emphasis is on clarity and brevity. We don’t want to waste your time with a 20-minute video that could easily be so much shorter. Related links… -What are derivatives? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wjlw7ZpZVK4 - What are options and covered warrants? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3196NpHDyec - What are futures? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwR5b6E0Xo4 - What is a swap? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVq384nqWqg - Why you should avoid structured products https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Umx5ShOz2oU
Views: 204245 MoneyWeek
Is It a Bad Idea to Buy Bonds When Interest Rates Are Going Up?
 
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http://IncredibleRetirement.com 800-393-1017 Here’s something I bet you didn't know. The U.S. stock market, the size of the U.S. stock market is about $30 trillion. If you added up the value of all publicly traded stocks in the U.S., the market value of all those companies would come up to around $30 trillion, but what about bonds? Bonds are hardly ever mentioned or talked about in the financial media, but I bet you might be surprised to discover that the U.S. bond market is actually much bigger than the stock market. The U.S. bond market is estimated to be $40 trillion or more. That's right, the bond market is actually larger than the stock market and yet the financial media has almost all their attention and therefore our attention on the stock market. So what about bonds? Should you be buying bonds when interest rates are going up? You may have heard that when interest rates go up, bond values go down, which is true. Think of a seesaw or a teeter totter, the end that goes up is interest rates and the end that goes down is the underlying value of the bond. Bonds by the way are nothing more than a loan to a company or government or government agency. Typically bonds pay their interest twice a year, every six months, and when the loan comes due, they have a maturity date which could range anywhere from 90 days to 30 years, when you get your money back. If you look at long term returns of investments, let's say 15 year timeframe or longer, then it's no secret stocks have outperformed bonds by a large, large margin; so if stocks do better than bonds over the long term why not just have all of your money in stocks? Well the problem is while stocks tend to deliver nice, long term returns, but the short term oh, that could be a whole other story. Stocks on the short term can be extremely volatile. Just look what happened in the financial crisis of 2008. The S&P 500, the 500 largest publically traded companies in America, lost about 38% in value. So $100,000 in the S&P 500 at the end of 2008 was now worth $62,000. Ouch! That's a lot of short term volatility which tends to make you and I uncomfortable, to say the least. So how do we dampen or minimize that volatility? Imagine you have a sailboat and you have entered it into a race. One way to make your sailboat go faster is to make it lighter. But the lighter the sailboat, the more likely it is to capsize with a gust of wind. To prevent that you add weight or ballast to the sailboat. That slows the speed of the boat down but it reduces the odds of the boat capsizing and sinking. This is how you should think of bonds in your overall investment strategy. They are going to slow down the overall growth of your investment accounts but they are there to keep you from capsizing, to keep you from sinking during short-term periods of market volatility. So the answer to the question should you buy bonds, even when interest rates are going up, as a long term investor, the answer is a qualified yes, and here's what I mean by that. If you buy individual bonds and hold the bond until it matures or is called away early by the issuer then you'll receive the interest and get all your money back when the bond matures. The value of the bond can and will fluctuate while you own it, but it doesn't affect you if you hold it to maturity because then you get all your money back. This is why it's important to own individual bonds, especially in a rising interest rate environment, you don't lose money if you hold the bond until maturity. Why not just use a bond mutual fund? The problem with a bond mutual fund is it doesn't have a maturity date. People are constantly adding or withholding money from the mutual fund itself and typically at the wrong time. In a rising interest rate market, a lot of people in bond mutual funds take some or all of their money out of the mutual fund which forces the mutual fund manager to sell bonds even if they didn't want to. They have to generate the money to pay back the investors and that could drive the value or the price of bonds down even further. Ideally, you want to use individual bonds so you know for sure you get your money back when the bond matures. If you have a small account, and I would say a small account would be $200,000 or less, then you may not have enough money to properly diversify into individual bonds and you may have to still use bond mutual funds and if that's the case in a rising interest rate market you want to focus on short term bond funds or floating rate bond funds. Buying individual bonds as part of your investment strategy will help you move one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want, when you want.
Views: 546 Brian Fricke
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Investing Basics: Bonds
 
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Bonds are one of the most common investments, but to many investors they’re still a mystery. In this video you’ll learn the basics of bonds and how they might be used by traders looking to preserve capital and pursue extra income.
Views: 111001 TDAmeritrade
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Key Things to Know about Fixed Income ETFs | Fidelity
 
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Find out more about exchange-traded funds with us at the https://www.fidelity.com/learning-center/investment-products/etf/overview To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Fixed income can be a critical part of nearly every well-diversified portfolio. Used correctly, fixed income can add diversification and a steady source of income to any investor’s portfolio. But how do you choose the right fixed-income ETF? The key to choosing the right fixed-income ETF lies in what it actually holds. U.S. bonds or international bonds? Government securities or corporate debt? Bonds that come due in two years or 20 years? Each decision determines the level of risk you’re taking and the potential return. There are many types of risks to consider with bond investing. Let’s talk more about two in particular: Credit risk and Interest-rate risk. Determining the level of credit risk you want to assume is an important first step when choosing a fixed-income ETF. Do you want an ETF that only holds conservative bonds—like bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury? Or do you want one holding riskier corporate debt? The latter may pay you a higher interest rate, but if the company issuing the bond goes bankrupt, you’ll lose out. ETFs cover the full range of available credit. Look carefully at the credit quality composition of the ETFs underlying holdings, and don’t be lured in by promises of high yields unless you understand the risks. Bonds are funny. Intuitively, you would assume that higher interest rates are good for bondholders, as they can reinvest bond income at higher prevailing interest rates. But rising interest rates may be bad news, at least in the short term. Imagine that the government issues a 10-year bond paying an interest rate of 2%. But shortly thereafter, the U.S. Federal Reserve hikes interest rates. Now, if the government wants to issue a new 10-year bond, it has to pay 3% a year in interest. No one is going to pay the same amount for the 2% bond as the 3% bond; instead, the price of the 2% bond will have to fall to make its yield as attractive as the new, higher-yielding security. That’s how bonds work, like a seesaw: As yields rise, prices fall and vice versa. Another important measure to consider when looking at interest rate risk is duration which helps to approximate the degree of price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. The longer the duration, the more any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Conversely, the shorter the duration, the less any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Let’s review a few other considerations when looking at fixed income ETFs. First, expense ratios: Because your expected return in a bond ETF is lower than in most stock ETFs, expenses take on extra importance. Generally speaking, the lower the fees, the better. Second, tracking difference: It can be harder to run a bond index fund than an equity fund, so you may see significant variation between the fund’s performance and the index’s returns. Try to seek out funds with low levels of tracking difference, meaning they track their index well. Finally, some bonds can be illiquid. As a result, it’s extra important to look out for bond ETFs with good trading volumes and tight spreads. There are other factors to watch for too, but these are the basics. ETFs can be a great tool for accessing the bond space, but as with anything, it pays to know what you’re buying before you make the leap. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, Rhode Island, 02917 723251.2.0
Views: 51870 Fidelity Investments
Schroder's De Mello Sees Value in Asian Government Bonds
 
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Sept. 29 (Bloomberg) -- Rajeev De Mello, head of Asian fixed income in Singapore at Schroder Investment, talks about regional bond markets and U.S. Treasuries. De Mello speaks with John Dawson on Bloomberg Television's "First Up." (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 106 Bloomberg
Bandila: Retail treasury bonds, inaalok ng gobyerno
 
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Para sa mga may extrang budget at naghahanap ng magandang investment, nag-aalok ngayon ang gobyerno ng retail treasury bond. Hindi kailangan dito ng malaking capital, pero tiyak na mas malaki ang interes na kikitain kumpara sa bangko. Subscribe to the ABS-CBN News channel! - http://bit.ly/TheABSCBNNews Watch the full episodes of Bandila on TFC.TV http://bit.ly/BANDILA-TFCTV and on IWANT.TV for Philippine viewers, click: http://bit.ly/Bandila-IWANTv Visit our website at http://news.abs-cbn.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/abscbnNEWS Twitter: https://twitter.com/abscbnnews
Views: 8041 ABS-CBN News
"Pay off Debt - Your Birth Certificate is Worth Millions" - Busting Myths
 
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We're busting myths and today, and discussing an unusual way people are trying to pay their bills and other debts - using popular conspiracy theories to access "secret" Treasury Direct Accounts. STRAWMAN/REDEMPTION CONSPIRACY ▶︎Brief history / Asserts the federal government granted a birth certificate (name in all caps - the "straw man" - also on social security, taxes, etc) and that the US government has "secret" trust accounts linked to each citizen. (Been used to avoid taxes; taxpayer claims they're not responsible for tax obligation of "straw man") BIRTH CERTIFICATE ▶︎Asserts the birth certificate "bond" created when you were born that prepays all of your debts. (US government declared bankruptcy in 1933 when the country went off the gold standard. Claims that the bankrupt country, in an effort to prevent foreclosure, pledged all Americans to “International Bankers” as collateral for the national debt. As a result, we are all slaves, and our birth certificates are traded on the markets as bonds worth millions.) ▶︎The IRS has categorized "redemption", "strawman", and "Bond Fraud" under Scams and Safety. UCC CODES ▶︎Acceptance for Value ▶︎Sight Drafts / Bills of Exchange / Promissory Bonds ▶︎"Drawing such drafts on the U.S. Treasury is fraudulent and violation of federal law." - Treasury Dept. ▶︎"It is a violation to Federal Law to misuse the Treasury seal or the words, titles, symbols, or emblems of the Treasury Department, or any service, bureau, office or Treasury subdivision; see 31 U.S.C. 333." SOCIAL SECURITY ▶︎Claims you can access your "secret trust" aka your "TDA" or Treasury Direct Account using your social security number and Federal Reserve routing number. ▶︎"Individuals do not have accounts at the Federal Reserve.The Federal Reserve provides banking services only for banks. Individuals do not have accounts at the Federal Reserve." - Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta ▶︎"Law enforcement, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), is aware of this scheme, and the Federal Reserve Banks, including the New York Fed, have been cooperating with law enforcement in their investigations. Individuals who participate in such schemes could face criminal charges." - Federal Reserve Bank of New York POSSIBLE OUTCOMES: ▶︎Those who have already tried these fraudulent forms of paying debt have already learned that it does not work. Federal Reserve Banks do not hold individual accounts, so your "payment" will be reversed or rejected and when it is, you will not only still owe the debt, but likely have incurred additional fees and may even have been sued, making yourself a candidate for wage garnishment or levy. ▶︎You will see claims that it worked in comment threads and such, but no real, long-term proof has ever been shown, to my knowledge. ▶︎In addition, you may find yourself slapped with hefty fees, fines and penalties, under FBI investigation, arrested and/or charged with a crime. ***RESOURCES*** FBI - https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes/redemption-strawman-bond-fraud FTC - https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2017/08/no-secret-bank-accounts-pay-your-bills US Dept. of the Treasury - https://www.treasury.gov/about/organizational-structure/ig/Pages/Scams/Bogus-Sight-Drafts.aspx US Dept. of the Treasury - https://www.treasury.gov/about/organizational-structure/ig/Pages/fraud-alerts_index2.aspx Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta - https://www.frbatlanta.org/news/pressreleases/atlantafed/2017/0712-consumer-scam-alert-fr-routing-numbers Federal Reserve Bank of New York - https://www.newyorkfed.org/banking/frscams.html IRS (See #8) - https://www.irs.gov/privacy-disclosure/the-truth-about-frivolous-tax-arguments-section-i-d-to-e#anch_83 IRS (See Rev. Rul. 2005-21) - https://www.irs.gov/irb/2005-14_IRB SHARE THIS VIDEO: https://youtu.be/sICp--cDyr0 SEE RELATED VIDEOS: https://goo.gl/sNa5fs ∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷ For more tips on how to get out of debt, SUBSCRIBE ➤➤➤ http://bit.ly/1ZPZ8Q2 ∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷∷ ▼FOLLOW ME: LinkedIn - www.linkedin.com/in/debtbytes Google+ - http://plus.google.com/+MichaelBovee Twitter - http://twitter.com/debtbytes Facebook - https://facebook.com/consumerrecoverynetwork/ ▼READ OUR BLOG: http://consumerrecoverynetwork.com ▼FIND YOUR DEBT SOLUTION: http://consumerrecoverynetwork.com/debt-solutions-review/ ▼ASK ME ANY QUESTIONS YOU HAVE: http://consumerrecoverynetwork.com/ask-a-question/ (reader questions for our channel are selected from here) Michael Bovee started CRN in 2004 with a mission to provide people in need with detailed credit and debt help. The DebtBytes Channel is an extension of the CRN blog, and is dedicated to finding the debt relief option or strategy that works best for you.
Views: 129455 Michael Bovee
Market Commentary - 15 May 2015 - Government Bond Price Actions
 
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Episode 25 In this episode of his market commentary Ed Talisse initially focusses on the recent price action in the government bond market, where while the yields are moving upwards they are still low when looking at the historical yields. Looking in the steepness of the curves and the cause of this. The factors include growth scares, inflation scares, risk aversion and confidence in central banks and their ability to control interest rates. Finally he looks at the equity markets looking at the top ETFs and factor analysis for Q1 2015. Edward is a global capital markets professional with more than 25 years of experience gained at Morgan Stanley and UBS. He is Chartered Financial Analyst, a holder of the Certificate in Quantitative Finance and a Certified Public Accountant.
Views: 70 CQF Institute
How To Invest In Stocks And Bonds For Beginners
 
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How to buy stocks, bonds, mutual funds, ETFs, real estate ... www.marketwatch.com/getting-started‎ MarketWatch Our guide will lead you through the basics of investing in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, exchange-traded funds and into the more exotic realms of options, futures ... ‎Investing in stocks - ‎How to buy mutual funds - ‎How to buy bonds - ‎How to buy ETFs The Essentials of Investing in Stocks and Bonds - For ... www.dummies.com/.../the-essentials-of-investing-in-stocks-and-bonds.ht...‎ If you're considering investing in stocks or bonds, you need a basic understanding of how the financial ... Investing in Stocks with Basic Knowledge of Economics. Investing for Beginners by Joshua Kennon beginnersinvest.about.com/‎ Mar 30, 2014 - The investing for beginners site includes articles, resources, lessons, ... and other information on basic investment ideas such as stocks, bonds, ...
Views: 973129 Paul Kortez
Face value, Coupon and Maturity of Bonds - SmarterWithMoney
 
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Investing in bonds can be tricky in today's market. Understanding the fundamental concepts associated with bonds is a good place to start.
Views: 22149 Religare
What is a Puttable Bond? How Do Puttable Bonds Work?
 
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What is a Puttable Bond? How Do Puttable Bonds Work? - Please take a moment to Like, Subscribe, and Comment on this video! View Our Channel To See More Helpful Finance Videos - https://www.youtube.com/user/FinanceWisdomForYou municipal bonds treasury bonds junk bonds corporate bonds bonds definition government bonds bond market types of bonds bond ratings stocks and bonds convertible bonds zero coupon bonds bond rates bond funds high yield bonds investing in bonds treasury bond bond prices muni bonds put options corporate bond municipal bond rates buying bonds debenture bonds general obligation bonds buy bonds corporate bond rates bond valuation bond quotes bond interest rates treasury bonds rates how bonds work investment grade bonds bond pricing how to invest in bonds discount bond corporate bonds definition bond trading short term bonds municipal bonds rates bond fund green bonds bonds and interest rates bond investing government bond tax exempt bonds government bond rates high yield bond mortgage bonds secured bonds mutual bonds best bonds to buy bond maturity bond screener aaa bonds where to buy bonds bonds for dummies muni bond rates bond rate baby bonds government bonds rates bond trader what is bonds bond markets municipal bond market bonds for sale invest in bonds long term bonds a bond indenture is cash bonds corporate bond prices best bonds to invest in what are corporate bonds municipal bonds treasury bonds junk bonds corporate bonds bonds definition government bonds bond market types of bonds bond ratings stocks and bonds convertible bonds zero coupon bonds bond rates bond funds high yield bonds investing in bonds treasury bond bond prices muni bonds put options corporate bond municipal bond rates buying bonds debenture bonds general obligation bonds buy bonds corporate bond rates bond valuation bond quotes bond interest rates treasury bonds rates how bonds work investment grade bonds bond pricing how to invest in bonds discount bond corporate bonds definition bond trading short term bonds municipal bonds rates bond fund green bonds bonds and interest rates bond investing government bond tax exempt bonds government bond rates high yield bond mortgage bonds secured bonds mutual bonds best bonds to buy bond maturity bond screener aaa bonds where to buy bonds bonds for dummies muni bond rates bond rate baby bonds government bonds rates bond trader what is bonds bond markets municipal bond market bonds for sale invest in bonds long term bonds a bond indenture is cash bonds corporate bond prices best bonds to invest in what are corporate bonds What is a Puttable Bond? How Do Puttable Bonds Work? Second, put provisions limit a bond's potential price depreciation, because when interest rates rise, the price of a putable bond will not go any lower than its put price. Intuitively, a putable bond is just a traditional bond with a put option attached. Thus, the price of a putable bond can also be intuitively split into the price of the nonputable bond and the price of the put option. This is why options pricing models can be used to price putable bonds and calculate their option-adjusted yields, durations, and convexities. What is a Puttable Bond? How Do Puttable Bonds Work? Bondholders have the option of putting bonds back to the issuer either once during the lifetime of the bond (known as a one-time put bond), or on a number of different dates. Of course, the special advantages of put bonds mean that some yield must be sacrificed. This type of bond is also known as a multimaturity bond, an option tender bond, a variable rate demand obligation (VRDO). Finance Wisdom For You Finance Wisdom For You What is a Puttable Bond? How Do Puttable Bonds Work?
Currency Trading #7 Government bonds and their role in the currency market?
 
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In part 7 of the Currency trading series, Kamal explains what are government bonds and their role in determining a currency's value. The way how bond yields are calculated and what happens when a country defaults on its bonds with an example using Greece's 2010 debt crisis which affected the whole of Europe. Directed and edited by AJ Roshan Watch the complete series here, http://bit.ly/2kC5XpJ Follow Us On FACEBOOK !!!-https://www.facebook.com/factmachine/?fref=ts Presented by Kamal Haz Edited by A.J. Roshan PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CHECK OUT Designer's Feed - http://ajcreativecorner.blogspot.in/ FACEBOOK- https://www.facebook.com/AJs3DVFX/?fref=ts
Views: 75 Jigarthanda!!
STOCK MARKET BASICS FOR BEGINNERS IN TELUGU | WHAT ARE BONDS IN STOCK MARKET IN TELUGU
 
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STOCK MARKET BASICS FOR BEGINNERS IN TELUGU | WHAT ARE BONDS IN STOCK MARKET IN TELUGUhttps://youtu.be/5Kj-6hcUDYA Welcome to Yours Niranjan channel Hello friends here in this channel you will find a lot of stuff for improving your knowledge.You will find a wide content of videos on history,biographies,success full stories after big failures,mystery videos et.c.Hope you will enjoy. ..This is Niranjan .. *SUCCESS STORIES *AMAZING FACTS *INSPIRATIONAL STORIES *SELF CONFIDENCE VIDEOS *HEALTH TIPS *MYTHS FACEBOOK PAGE : https://www.facebook.com/YoursNiranjan/ YOUTUBE : http://www.youtube.com/c/YoursNiranjan TWITTER PAGE : https://twitter.com/niranjanroyal
Views: 3494 Yours Niranjan
What Is The Interest Rate On Government Bonds?
 
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This makes treasury current interest rates. Us 10 year government bond interest rate is at 2. Today (3 22 2012) the interest rate on ee series savings bond 3 feb 2016 treasury yields keep sliding. Coupon interest and yield for etbs treasury bonds how to earn 3. Rates are mainly determined by the price charged lender, risk from get updated data about us treasuries. But amazingly enough, u. When i read this statement, thought it was odd. Us 10 year government bond interest rate ycharts. The 8% government of india bonds livemint. Latest bond rates, interest libor and interbank rates ft. Interest rates long term interest oecd data. Average interest rates on u. Rates & bonds bloomberg. Negative interest rates a third of all government bonds are quartz. 5% on a us savings bond forbes. Show is the interest rate on a treasury bond determined? Interest rates and your investments investopedia. If you are just remember anything that increases the demand for long term treasury bonds puts downward pressure on interest rates (higher higher refer to government maturing in ten years. Graph and download economic data from jan 1957 to oct 2016 about india, securities, bonds, government, interest rate, interest, rate at karvy value, chose a list of top tax free bonds in india with coupon & last traded price, etc. 13 apr 2016 other comparable products such as fixed deposits from banks like sbi and hdfc bank pay a maximum of 7. The incredible shrinking interest rate febtreasury bonds cbk central bank of kenya. Fixed rate from jul 2017, inflation effective 01 jun 2017. List of best government bonds in india bond 10y calendar average interest rates on u. Sthe files listed below illustrate the average interest rates for marketable and non securities over 15 apr 2015 explore difference between bond coupons, what determines current yield on debt instruments, why treasury prices most investors care about future rates, but none more than bondholders. The bonds will bear interest at the rate of 8. Government of india savings bond make a comeback. Under income tax act, the by interest on india 10y increased 0. Bond rates look shockingly high when compared to yields for other developed most treasury bonds in kenya are fixed rate, meaning that the interest rate determined at auction is locked entire life of bond. Rates rsa retail savings bonds. 19 Government of india savings bond make a comeback. Find information on government bonds yields, muni and interest rates in the usa 7 jul 2016 if you were to buy, at random, any bond, there is a one three third of global debt now has negative latest international benchmark treasury bond rates, yield curves, spreads, interbank official coupon rate set when first issued by australian are medium long term securities that carry an annual fixed over life 22 mar 2012 source us dept. Feb 2017 they carry an assured interest rate of. Bonds infrastructure bonds, bonds market, capital gains interest rates, government securities, for india tax free. Inflation rate inflation linked 5 year bond, 2.
Views: 126 new sparky
Warren Buffett on Federal Reserve Policy to Buy Government Bonds
 
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http://seekingalpha.com/author/value-investors-portal/articles#regular_articles Warren Buffett on Federal Reserve Policy to Buy Government Bonds
Views: 8309 valueinvestorsportal
How Do Bonds Work?
 
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The topic is Bonds: Government Bonds. Where is a safe place to put your money that will result in steady growth? You have to defeat the nefarious forces of inflation, after all, and loaning your money to the government's always been a safe option. While you can put some of your trust in steadfast bonds, keep in mind that today's government treasury bonds are nothing like they were in the heyday of the 1980s, when they reached an all-time high interest rate! Though now their rates have normalized, the long term nature of bonds (usually 10 years) creates an interesting market for trading bonds at different rates. To learn more about bonds, interest rates or inflation, surf over to FinLitTV.com or click Subscribe for more FLiCs.
Views: 20131 FinLit
Government Securities Bonds - EE Savings Bonds / Treasury Bonds Part 1
 
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Remember to Like, Comment and Subscribe - Thanks! *My Website: http://bit.ly/FIWebsite *My Facebook: http://bit.ly/FInvestor BOOKS: Best Book on Detailed Assets & Liabilities: http://amzn.to/2uk238F Second Pick Investing Guidance: http://amzn.to/2gRt1jd Classic Important Read on Investing: http://amzn.to/2ujKIfS Best Book on Dividend Investing: http://amzn.to/2fahlYg Second Pick on Dividend Investing: http://amzn.to/2v0OzNw Best Recession & Bailout Book: http://amzn.to/2gS7pDi Robinhood: http://bit.ly/RobinRefer - Get a FREE Stock Through My Referral Link! Acorns: http://bit.ly/BAcorns - Referrals Get 5$ Free! Thanks for visiting Financial Investor I'll be covering topics on how to set us up financially for the future. I Will Cover Stock information, News, Advice, Updates, Dividends, Mutual Funds, New IPO Releases & MORE so look no further than the Financial Investor ----- Video Information ----- https://www.treasurydirect.gov/tdhome.htm Main Highlights: * EE Bonds earn a FIXED Rate from the purchase date - 30 yrs. * 1997-2005 - Have a Variable Rate * Current Rate .10% 1May-31Oct * EE & I Bonds if used for Higher Ed can be excluded From Taxes. * EE Bonds Will Double to Face Value after 20 Years * EE Bonds Fixed rate may change after 20 Years * EE Bonds Cannot Sell Before 12 Months, Lose 3 Month Interest if Sold Before 5 Yrs, Earn Continued Interest for 30 Years
Views: 2423 Financial Investor
Types of Risks Involved when Investing in Stocks, Bonds, and Real Estate
 
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Let's make the financial world very simple and understandable. Types of risks involved with investing in stocks, bonds, and real estate. Have you ever wondered exactly how much risk is involved with the investing? It never fails, when I have new clients coming in, they say they want all of the upside but none of the downside. Basically, they want their cake and to eat it too. However, the problem is you can't invest without taking some risks.  We face a variety of risks when investing route. So today I'm going to go over what those are and how you can deal with them. Types of Risk Involved with Investing 1. Market risk The risk of investments declining in value because of economic developments or other events that affect the entire market. The main types of market risk are equity risk, interest rate risk, and currency risk.  Equity risk – applies to an investment in shares. The market price of shares varies all the time depending on demand and supply. Equity risk is the risk of loss because of a drop in the market price of shares. Interest rate risk – applies to debt investments such as bonds. It is the risk of losing money because of a change in the interest rate. For example, if the interest rate goes up, the market value of bonds will drop. Currency risk – applies when you own foreign investments. It is the risk of losing money because of a movement in the exchange rate. For example, if the U.S. dollar becomes less valuable relative to the Canadian dollar, your U.S. stocks will be worthless in Canadian dollars. 2. Liquidity risk The risk of being unable to sell your investment at a fair price and get your money out when you want to. To sell the investment, you may need to accept a lower price. In some cases, such as exempt market investments, it may not be possible to sell the investment at all. 3. Concentration risk The risk of loss because your money is concentrated in a particular type of investment. When you diversify your investments, you spread the risk over different types of investments, industries, and geographic locations. 4. Credit risk The risk that the government entity or company that issued the bond will run into financial difficulties and won't be able to pay the interest or repay the principal at maturity. Credit risk applies to debt investments such as bonds. You can evaluate credit risk by looking at the credit rating of the bond. For example, long-term Canadian government bonds have a credit rating of AAA, which indicates the lowest possible credit risk. 5. Inflation risk The risk of a loss in your purchasing power because the value of your investments does not keep up with inflation. Inflation erodes the purchasing power of money over time – the same amount of money will buy fewer goods and services. Inflation risk is particularly relevant if you own cash or debt investments like bonds. Shares offer some protection against inflation because most companies can increase the prices they charge to their customers. Share prices should, therefore, rise in line with inflation. Real estate also offers some protection because landlords can increase rents over time. 6. Horizon risk The risk that your investment horizon may be shortened because of an unforeseen event, for example, the loss of your job. This may force you to sell investments that you were expecting to hold for the long term. If you must sell at a time when the markets are down, you may lose money. 7. Longevity risk The risk of outliving your savings. This risk is particularly relevant for people who are retired or are nearing retirement. 8. Foreign investment risk The risk of loss when investing in foreign countries. When you buy foreign investments, for example, the shares of companies in emerging markets, you face risks that do not exist in Canada, for example, the risk of nationalization. 9. Call Risk  This is a risk for bond issues and refers to the possibility of a debt security being called before maturity. This typically takes place when interest rates are dropping. 11. Social / Political Risk  The risk associated with the possibility of nationalization, unfavorable government action or social changes resulting in a loss of value is called social or political risk. These are just a blip of the different types of risk that are involved with investing. You can experience any of these at any time! I tell you all that because investing is complicated, which is why I implore you to hire a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™. Making that choice could help make your life financially simple. Contact us if you have questions about these or any more of the risks involved with investing. Thanks for watching Types of risks involved with investing in stocks, bonds, and real estate. Check out my blog, www.financiallysimple.com
Returns Beyond Government Bonds? | FT Markets
 
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► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs The search for higher yields has sent many investors to junk bonds, co-cos, emerging market debt and munis. John Authers, the FT's senior investment columnist, examines the risks involved. ► FT Wealth: http://bit.ly/1e3996C ► FT Business: http://bit.ly/1KUK08s ► Bond Turmoil: http://bit.ly/1JUa4Dy
Views: 2613 Financial Times
Australian Government Bonds at Historic Low Rate  - Kris Sayce Update 17/06/2016
 
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In today’s video update Kris looks at the bond markets and the historically low rate for Australia’s government debt… If you’re interested in making money from arguably the biggest trend driving Australia’s economic future, don’t invest a cent until you read this free special investor report. http://www.moneymorning.com.au/leadgen/chinas-new-boom-fb Visit our website - http://www.moneymorning.com.au/ Subscribe now - http://www.moneymorning.com.au/subscribe-yt/ We provide general financial product advice only. The advice published by Money Morning Australia has been prepared without taking into account your objectives, financial situations or needs. Before acting on our recommendations, you should consider their appropriateness to your specific investment objectives, financial situation and needs. If you are uncertain as to what your objectives and needs are, you should contact a financial adviser or stockbroker who is licensed to provide you with personal financial product advice
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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This narrated PPT describes how a zero coupon bond works, along with an example of how to calculate the yield to maturity. We contrast the yield to maturity with the bond equivalent yield.
Views: 22089 Elizabeth Schmitt

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