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Syntax - The Functional Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #1)
 
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This introductory E-Lecture, which is part of our series "The Structure of English" discusses the main functional elements of clause structure, i.e. the functional aspects of clause structure in two PDE sentences.
SYN102 - Syntactic Functions in PDE
 
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This introductory E-Lecture, which is part of our series "The Structure of English", discusses the central syntactic functional elements of clause structure in PDE. It serves as an overview, i.e. as a first approach towards a functional analysis of PDE clause structure.
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #1)
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
Sentence Analysis: Syntax & Grammar | Educational Videos for Kids
 
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Learn to analyze sentences with quick and easy examples! SUBSCRIBE ▶ http://bit.ly/Creators365Sub Prayers are unimembres when it is not possible to separate subject and predicate bimembres , when they have two terms. On the subject, the core is a noun and the predicate, a verb. If the subject has more than one core, it is a compound subject, if you have one, the subject is simple. If the predicate has more of a verbal nucleus is compound verbal predicate and, if you have only one, it's simple verbal predicate. WATCH MORE ▶ http://bit.ly/Creators365 FOLLOW US: Facebook ▶ http://facebook.com/Aula365 Twitter ▶ http://twitter.com/aula365 Instagram ▶ http://instagram.com/aula365 ----------------------------------------------------- Welcome to Creators365, where emotion is learning to create. Here you will find the most important content for school subjects: Math, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences and Language. Find us at: https://www.aula365.com The funniest learning social network in the world!
Views: 3754 Creators
Language Analysis: Grammar
 
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A session focussing on parts of speech, sentence and clause elements and verb phrases and noun phrases.
Views: 33123 Katharine Stapleford
form vs. function
 
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form vs. function in parts of speech
Views: 25299 MUHSonline
Grammar - Sentence Analysis
 
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5th graders analyze a complex sentence. In the first layer students identify parts of speech. In the second layer students identify subject and predicate. In the third layer students identify any phrases. In the fourth layer students identify the sentence type and the sentence structure.
Views: 33134 Mary Beth Steven
Grammatical Analysis
 
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In this lesson, we analyze the clauses and parts of speech on the first page of Roald Dahl's 'The Witches'.
Views: 3144 MrSkypelessons
Sentence Analysis from The Jabberwocky
 
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Fifth graders analyze the first sentence of The Jabberwocky.
Views: 4713 Mary Beth Steven
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #4)
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
Sentence Functions
 
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Views: 223 Chris Bentley
Sentence Analysis - 4 Level
 
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Fifth graders analyze a sentence. First, parts of speech are identified. Second, parts of the sentence are identified. Third, phrases are identified. Fourth, the sentence type and sentence structure are identified.
Views: 2809 Mary Beth Steven
Sentence Analysis - 4 Level
 
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Fifth graders analyze a sentence by identifying parts of speech, parts of the sentence, phrases, and clauses.
Views: 305 Mary Beth Steven
Syntax (Part 1)
 
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A brief overview of lexical categories, phrase structure rules, and syntactic tree structures.
Views: 212872 Evan Ashworth
Generative Syntax 4.2-4.4: Sentence Structure
 
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Prof Caroline Heycock looks at movement, the VP-internal subject hypothesis and adjunction. The class numbers follow the chapter numbers of the free online textbook “Syntax of Natural Language” by Santorini and Kroch at http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~beatrice/syntax-textbook/. CC BY-NC-SA (3.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Sentence Analysis 5th Grade Part 1
 
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5th Grade students analyze a sentence in four layers: parts of speech, parts of the sentence, phrases, sentence type, and sentence structure
Views: 2537 Mary Beth Steven
Advanced English Grammar: Dependent Clauses
 
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Do you have a hard time understanding dependent clauses? In English, we have four types of dependent clauses. In this advanced lesson, I'll help you understand each type of dependent clause and its purpose. I'll give you definitions and examples of each clause. Mastering these clauses will improve your reading comprehension and make you a better writer. After the class, take the quiz to practice what you've learned. http://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-grammar-dependent-clauses/ Watch Adam's series on clauses! Noun Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SrEEPt4MQA Adjective Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpV39YEmh5k Adverb Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkooLJ9MWVE TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam, and today's lesson is a special lesson. It's an introduction to dependent clauses. Now, before I begin, I want you to understand I'm only going to look at the functions of the dependent clauses today. I'm not going to look at how they're built, how to structure them, the conjunctions they use, the relative pronouns they use; only about the functions, because it's very important that you are able to recognize the different types of dependent clauses. Once you recognize the function of a clause, you know how it's built, you know what it's doing in the sentence, you can understand the sentence better, you can write better sentences. So, dependent clauses, what are they? First of all, they're also called subordinate clauses. You might see "subordinate", you might see "dependent". They're very different from the independent clause. The independent clause is a clause that can stand by itself, and has a complete meaning. It doesn't have... It doesn't need any other information. A "clause" is a collection of words-sorry-that must include a subject and a verb. Okay, we have basically four types. Technically, we think of three types, but there's one extra one that we're going to look at today. We have "noun clauses", we have "adjective clauses"-adjective clauses" are also called "relative clauses"-we have "adverb clauses", and we have something called a "that clause", which is really none of these three. It's closest to the noun clause, but it doesn't function like a noun clause. We're going to start with the noun clause, then. What is a noun clause? First of all, a noun clause has a specific function in a sentence. It is used, just like it's called, it's used like a noun. You think of a noun clause as you would a noun, except that it's a clause. There's a subject, there's a verb, there's other pieces to it. We can use it as a subject of a sentence, we can use it as a subject of an otherwise independent clause. "What you do in your free time is your business." So, look... Let's, first of all, look at all the verbs, here. We have "do" and we have "is". We have two verbs. The subject for "you"... For "do" is "you". Okay? What is the subject for "is"? Well, if you look around, it's not "time", it's not "your", and it's not "you" because "you" is already being used. So the whole thing: "What you do in your free time", this is the subject, this is the verb, this is the subject complement. Okay? Now, very rarely do people actually use noun clauses as subjects, especially in writing. What they might say is "it": "It is your business what you do in your free time." Okay? We call this a "preparatory 'it'". It means we prepare you for the subject that's going to come later. Why do we do this? Because it's more... It's a bit awkward to do it like this. It's more convenient to begin with "it", get to the verb, and get to whatever comes after the verb, and put the subject later because it's long. Okay? "What you do in your free time", subject, "is", verb. Now, we can use it as a subject complement. A subject complement looks like an object, but it is not. It comes after a "be" verb. It comes after a "be" verb, okay? And it completes the meaning of the subject. So, Tom, what do we know about Tom? "Tom isn't"... Isn't what? He "isn't what you would call friendly." This is the noun clause. There is the subject, there is the verb. These, by the way, these are just called the pronouns or the conjunctions, whatever you want to call them. They begin the clause. Now, as we know from other lessons, "is" works like an equal sign. Tom, not really friendly. That's basically what this sentence means. This is the subject complement to Tom, noun clause. Notice the conjunction "what" can only be used in a noun clause; not in an adjective clause, not in an adverb clause.
What is a sentence? | Syntax | Khan Academy
 
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A sentence is a grammatically complete idea. All sentences have a noun or pronoun component called the subject, and a verb part called the predicate. David and Paige explore this division across several different example sentences. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/grammar/syntax/v/three-types-of-sentence-syntax-khan-academy Syntax on Khan Academy: Syntax is the ordering of language; it’s the study of how sentences work. In this section, we’ll scratch the surface of syntax as it applies to English grammar. Much more can be said about this subject, but we’ll save that for KA Linguistics. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to KhanAcademy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 149800 Khan Academy
Analysis of Sentence In Parts | Types of Sentence | Simple, Compound, Complex
 
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Hi everyone, This video is a thorough discussion on Sentence, Analysis of sentence ans types of sentences based on analysis. This is the second and last part of Sentence Analysis. Do watch the previous video to understand this concept better. Leave your feedback or questions down below in comment box. Watch and leave your comments. Only positive vibes please....
Views: 191 E Knowledge Hub
Grammar Lecture 2-1 | Form and Function English 382
 
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Click on this link to download the lecture notes:
Views: 12175 Jeff Everhart
Analysis of one sentence with two independent clauses by KLB
 
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THIS VIDEO SHOWS YOU HOW TO ANALYSE ONE SENTENCE WITH TWO INDEPENDENT CLAUSES.
Views: 1135 søren hansen
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #2)
 
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In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
The analysis of complex sentences
 
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This video is about the processes involved in the analysis of complex sentences. It is a step-by-step guide to the process as I use it with my own students.
Views: 1415 Language at UWE
Sentence Analysis - Simple Independent Clause
 
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5th graders analyze a sentence by identifying parts of speech, parts of the sentence, phrases, the sentence type, and the sentence structure.
Views: 1737 Mary Beth Steven
Function of a Sentence
 
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✅ SUBSCRIBE: https://goo.gl/tYpMcp 👍 Visit our website for help on any subject or test! https://goo.gl/AsjYfS Learn more about the different functions of a sentence. Understand how to identify what type a sentence is. Make sure you are prepared for your exam. Mometrix Academy is the world's most comprehensive test preparation company. This channel will provide you with videos that will help you learn about many different subjects. ►Mometrix Homepage: http://www.mometrix.com ►Academy Homepage: https://www.mometrix.com/academy/ ►Mometrix Flashcards: http://www.flashcardsecrets.com/ ►Follow Mometrix Academy on Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/mometrixacademy/ ►Mometrix Test Preparation Academy: http://goo.gl/1A9qj7 ►Visit: http://www.mometrix.com/academy/function-of-a-sentence/
Views: 4113 Mometrix Academy
Sentence Analysis Exercise
 
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In English 8, students review the basic parts of a sentence, subject and predicate, and analyze their own sentences for these parts. This discussion led to work on the sentence analysis sheet.
Views: 14976 Alexander Clarkson
The 4 English Sentence Types – simple, compound, complex, compound-complex
 
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Did you know there are only four sentence types in English? To improve your writing and reading skills in English, I'll teach you all about simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences in this grammar video. You'll learn how to identify the independent and dependent clauses. Don't worry, it's easier than it sounds! By learning to identify and use these sentence structures, you'll make your writing more interesting and dynamic. I'll also share many example sentences in the lesson, so you can practice with my help. http://www.engvid.com/the-4-english-sentence-types-simple-compound-complex-compound-complex/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is a writing lesson, but it's also a spoken English lesson. It's about anything to do with English, because we're going to be looking at sentence types. Now, of course, when you speak, you're using all kinds of sentence types. But, especially in writing, it's important to know the different types of sentences, because, especially if you're going to be writing tests, they want to see sentence variety. And even if you're not writing tests, anything you write, if you're using only one type of sentence, your writing becomes very bland, very boring, very hard to follow, because it's a little bit monotone. So what you need to do is you need to vary... You need a variety of sentence structures in your writing to give it a little bit more life. Okay? Luckily, you only need to know four sentence types. We have simple sentences, compound sentences, complex sentences, and compound-complex. Now, this is not exactly easy, but it's not exactly hard, either. If you figure out what you need to have in each one, in each sentence type, just make sure it's there. Okay? Let's start. A simple sentence has one independent clause. A little bit of review: What is an independent clause? An independent clause has a subject and a verb, and can complete an idea. It can stand by itself, because the idea in that clause is complete. I don't need to add anything else to it. Okay. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses, joined by a conjunction. A compound conjunction: "and", "but", "or", "so", "for" (not very common), etc. So, we join two independent clauses with a compound conjunction. You can have more, but again, you have to be a little bit careful. Once you get to three, start to look for a way to finish your sentence, because if you get to the fourth, you already have a crazy sentence that has the... Runs the risk of being a run-on sentence. Eventually, you're going to make a mistake, you're going to miss something, and the whole sentence falls apart. I don't recommend three, but you can put three. Then we have a complex sentence. A complex sentence has one independent clause, plus one or more dependent clause. A dependent clause is a clause that has a subject and a verb, but cannot stand by itself. It is not a complete idea. It has some sort of relationship to the independent clause. We have three types of dependent clauses. We have noun clauses, we have adjective clauses, and we have adverb clauses. Okay? That's a whole separate lesson. You can look at that later. But you have to have one of these, plus one of these, and you have a complex sentence. Next we have a compound-complex sentence. Here you have two or more independent clauses, again, joined by a conjunction, and one or more dependent clause. Okay? So you have basically all the elements in this sentence. Then, once you have all this stuff, you can add as many complements, or basically extras, as you want. So, let's look at an example. We're going to start with the simple sentence: "Layla studied biology." Very simple. I have a subject, I have a verb, I have an object. Okay? This is a simple sentence. It's an independent clause; it can stand by itself as a complete idea. Now, I can add anything I want to this that is not another clause of any type, and it'll still be a simple sentence. So I can say: "My friend Layla studied biology in university." I'll just say "uni" for short. I have more information, but do I have a different type of sentence? No. It's still a simple sentence. Now, let's look at this sentence. First, let me read it to you: "Even with the weather being that nasty, the couple and their families decided to go ahead with the wedding as planned." Now you're thinking: "Wow, that's got to be a complex sentence", right? "It's so long. There's so much information in it." But, if we look at it carefully, it is still a simple sentence. Why? Because we only have one independent clause. Where is it? Well, find the subject and verb combination first. So, what is the subject in this sentence? I'll give you a few seconds, figure it out. Hit the pause key, look at it. Okay, we're back. Here is the subject: "the couple and their families". Now, don't get confused with this "and".
PHRASE vs. CLAUSE - What's the Difference? - English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clauses
 
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What is the difference between a phrase and a clause? Watch this video and find out. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 In this lesson, you will also learn about the different types of phrases and clauses with examples. Topics include dependent and independent clauses, noun phrases, verb phrases, adverb phrases etc. ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WILL vs. SHALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwfUXeO3AfU&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WHO vs. WHOM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX_E_p4tfW0&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ DO or MAKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObRS73F4tok&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F90m3SbXQqQ&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the difference between phrases and clauses. Are these different grammar items or are they just two names for the same thing? That's what we're going to talk about in this video. Now before we start just remember: if you have any questions at all you just have to ask me in the comments section below and I will talk to you there. So in this lesson we're going to learn the difference between phrases and clauses. But first let's talk about how phrases and clauses are similar. They're similar in this way: both of these refer two groups of words that are meaningful. Look at these examples: near my home or Dexter won the bicycle race You can see that these are meaningful so one of them is afraid and the other is a clause OK so what's the difference between them? Well the difference is this: a clause is a group of words with a subject-verb combination so Dexter won the bicycle race is a clause because it has a subject - Dexter and a verb - won is the past tense of win so this is a clause. A phrase is a group of words without a subject-verb combination. So near my home is a phrase because there's no subject verb combination It's very simple but keep this important difference in mind - a clause has a subject-verb combination and a phrase does not. So now let me show you some more examples so that you can learn how to easily identify phrases and clauses Alright all the words that you see on the screen are phrases. You'll notice that in all of these there's no subject verb combination and these examples also show the most common types of phrases For example my two wonderful dogs is a phrase focusing on the noun dogs and the phrase the tallest building in the world focuses on the noun building so we say that these are noun phrases. What about couldn't go and will be working? Can you guess what type of phrases these are? These are verb phrases because they only have verbs in them. All of these words are verbs similarly we have the adjective phrases very friendly and afraid of the dark we say that these are adjective phrases because the focus is on friendly and afraid - the other words in these phrases are only helping the main words and the main words are adjectives. Really fast and much quicker are adverb phrases because the adverbs fast and quicker are the focus of these phrases and finally what about near the post office and on the 29th? Do you know? These are preposition phrases because each of these tells us about a place or about time using the prepositions near and on. These are the most common types of phrases that you will come across and once again remember these are phrases because they don't have a subject verb combination. So let's now look at some examples of clauses like I said a clause is just like a phrase - it's a group of words but a clause has a subject verb combination now in English there are many different kinds of causes but the two most important that you need to know about are independent and dependent clauses let's start with the independent clause this is simply a clause that can stand alone as a sentence. For example He ate dinner this is a clause because it has a subject - he - and a verb - ate - past tense of eat and it's independent because it can be a sentence on its own. So what's a dependent clause then? Well it's a clause that is it has a subject-verb combination but it cannot be a sentence by itself. For example When James got home is a dependent clause - it has a subject - James - and a verb - got - but if you think about it it's not a complete sentence because if I said when James got home you will ask okay then what? What happened? So you see the sentence isn't complete so this is a dependent clause.
Views: 313078 Learn English Lab
Sentence lesson 2 in English | Analysis of Sentences | English grammar tutorial
 
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There are four types of sentence structures with a view to analysis: 1) Simple Sentence 2) Compound Sentence 3) Complex Sentence 4) Compound complex Sentence A sentence can consist of a single clause or several clause.A sentence must contain at least one independent clause. 1) Simple Sentence: A simple sentence is one one which has only one subject and one predicate or we can say it has only one principal clause. As- a) An honest man is loved by all. b) The children are happy. 2) Compound Sentence:A compound sentence is made up of two or more principal clauses(independent clause).Two or more than two principal clauses are joined by co-coordinating conjunctions in the sentence;as- a) The children are happy but they want to eat ice-cream. b) The moon rose and everything looked bright. Out of the examples given above, in example no.(1)-’the children are happy’ and ‘they want to eat ice-cream’ are principal clauses.Both are joined by coordinating conjunction-’but’.Each principal clause has a subject and a predicate.Therefore, this is a compound sentence. How to identify Compound Sentences If two or more than two clauses are joined by coordinating conjunctions such as- and, as well as, but, for, nevertheless, so, still, yet, whereas, either…or, neither……..nor, not only…….but also, while, both…...and etc in a sentence, that sentence is compound sentence. 3) Complex Sentence: A complex sentence consist of one principal clause and one or more than one subordinate clauses(dependent clause).One principal clause and one or more than one subordinating clauses are joined together by subordinating conjunctions in the sentence; as- a)I have two nephews who are engineers. b) As we tried to enter the Inn, the Innkeeper said that there was no room. Out of the examples given above,in example no.(1)’I have two nephews’ is principal clause and ‘ who are engineers’ is subordinate clause which are joined by subordinating conjunction ‘who’. In example no.(2)’As we tried to enter the Inn’ is a subordinate clause because its meaning itself is not clear and ‘ that there was no room’ is also subordinate clause.Both subordinate clauses are dependent on the principal clause-’The Innkeeper said’ for their meaning. One principal clause and two subordinate clauses are joined by subordinating conjunction ‘as’ and ‘that’. How to identify Complex Sentence If two or more than two clauses are joined by subordinating conjunctions such as- as, as if, as though, as that, as long as, as much as, as soon as, as than, although, though, as far as, before , because, if, whether, who ,whom ,whose, which, what, when, how, where, till, until, unless. Etc, that sentence is complex sentence. 4) Compound Complex Sentence(Mixed sentence):This type of sentence is consist of at least two principal clauses and one subordinate clause. As- a) He went to market and brought a costly wrist watch that was stolen a few weeks later. In the above example ‘he went to market’ and ‘(he)brought a costly wrist watch’ are principal clauses. Both are joined by coordinating conjunction-’and’ and ‘that was stolen a few weeks later’ is a subordinating clause. Practice Find out the sentence type on the basis of its structure- 1) The teacher is teaching while the students are playing. 2) Home Minister is coming to visit today. 3) Rohan cried when his bit him,but he soon got better. 4) Meena was resting when the Mohan came. Once you learn it you can use it for your life time. Enjoy the lessons. If you find this video helpful for learning Analysis of sentence then please share it with friends. If you have any type of difficulties, Your quires are most welcomed. We will be happy to help you. You can put queries in comment section or message on Facebook. Check Our other Lessons and Post in below Platforms :- Website :- http://www.hellocuriousbrain.com/ Facebook :- https://www.facebook.com/hellocurious... Twitter :- https://twitter.com/hicuriousbrain Youtube Channel :- https://www.youtube.com/c/hellocuriou... Instagram :- https://www.instagram.com/hellocuriou... Google + :- https://plus.google.com/u/0/communiti... Pinterest :- https://in.pinterest.com/hicuriousbrain/ Whatsapp :- 7095836066 Thank You ..
Views: 2059 Curious Brain
Declarative Sentences: Four Functional Sentence Types
 
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Sentencing brings you a mini-series on the four types of sentences typically taught in high school and college grammar courses. These are sentence types best considered functional. This way of looking at sentences looks at them by the purpose they serve in a paragraph. This video discusses declarative sentences and explains what defines a sentence as one that makes a declaration. Here's a list of the other videos in this series: Introduction: https://youtu.be/fP82_vMle-Q Declarative: https://youtu.be/NCLeGyOa6fQ Imperative: https://youtu.be/1CetFLFLLiw Interrogative: https://youtu.be/z4V5nq6uMWY Exclamatory: https://youtu.be/yPI26Pnd4q4 My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/DavidHancock Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_David_Hancock_ Gear I used for Filming and Editing: Video Capture and Film Digitization- Pentax K-3 (http://www.ricoh-imaging.co.jp/english/products/k-3/) or Pentax K-1 (http://www.ricoh-imaging.co.jp/english/products/k-1/) Secondary Capture- Sony CX330 (https://www.sony.com/electronics/camcorders/t/handycam-camcorders) Lens- Pentax 31mm FA Limited (https://www.pentaxforums.com/lensreviews/SMC-Pentax-FA-31mm-F1.8-Limited-Lens.html) Off-camera Audio- Tascam DR-70D or Tascam DR-60D MKII and Tascam DR-05 (http://tascam.com/product/dr-70d/ or http://tascam.com/product/dr-60dmkii/ and http://tascam.com/product/dr-05/) Video Editing- Vegas Movie Studio Platinum (http://www.vegascreativesoftware.com/us/) Audio Processing- Adobe Soundbooth
How to Do Sentence Label Bracketing
 
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In the video, you will find an example for applying syntactic label bracketing. This video was inspired by one of our Facebook page fans. Leave your question in comments, you might inspire us to make more beneficial videos ^_^
Views: 2719 Alaa Ahmed Usama
Syntax - The Formal Analysis of Sentences (VLC Series #3)
 
05:50
In this short combinatory video (screencast plus e-lecture), Prof. Handke discusses the formal analysis of a sentences: First, in terms of its simple and phrasal categories and then by looking at the clausal structure.
Sentence | Analysis of Sentence | Types of Sentence | Basic English Grammar | E Knowledge Hub
 
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Hi everyone, This video is a thorough discussion on Sentence, Analysis of sentence ans types of sentences based on analysis. Do watch the previous video to understand this concept better. Leave your feedback or questions down below in comment box. Watch and leave your comments. Only positive vibes please....
Views: 632 E Knowledge Hub
Advanced English Grammar: Noun Clauses
 
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Having trouble finding the subject or object in a sentence? It might be a noun clause. In this lesson, we'll look at the dependent clause and its conjunctions in order to write better sentences and to read high-level texts like those you will find in newspapers, academic essays, and literature. This is also important if you're in university or taking a test like IELTS or TOEFL. As a writer, I focus my attention on the many elements we use to build great sentences and paragraphs. I've broken down this advanced part of English grammar and will teach it to you simply -- so you can understand and use the noun clauses in your own writing. I'll show you many examples of noun clauses, so you can see the noun clause in context. Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-grammar-noun-clauses/ to practice identifying the types of noun clauses in example sentences. Watch Adam's series on clauses! Dependent Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BsBbZqwU-c Adjective Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpV39YEmh5k Adverb Clauses https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkooLJ9MWVE TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at some more advanced grammar. We're going to look at the noun clause. Now, you may have seen my previous video where I did an introduction to subordinate clauses. Today I'm going to look at only one, only the noun clause, get a little bit deeper into it, show you some examples, show you how it works, how to build it, when to use it, etc. So before we begin, let's review: What is a clause? A clause is a combination of words that must contain a subject and a verb. Okay? Now, every sentence has at least one independent clause. The noun clause is a dependent clause. Okay? I'm going to write that here. It's a dependent. What that means is that this clause cannot be a sentence by itself. It is always part of a sentence that contains an independent clause, but the noun clause can be part of the independent clause, and we're going to see that in a moment. But before we do that, we also have to look at the conjunctions. Okay? So these are the words... The conjunctions are the words that join the noun clause to its independent clause or that begin the noun clause. Okay? And again, we're going to look at examples. So these are the ones you need to know: "that", "which", "who", "whom", "whose", "what", "if", "whether", "when", "where", "how", "why", and then: "whoever", "whomever", "whenever", "wherever", "whatever", "whichever". These can all be conjunctions. Now, you have to be careful with a few of them. Some of these can also be conjunctions to adjective clauses, which will be a different video lesson entirely. And you also have to remember that this clause in particular: "that", is quite often removed. Means it's understood to be there, it's implied, but we don't actually have to write it or say it when we're using the noun clause. And again, we're going to look at examples of that. Another thing to remember is that only some of these can be both the conjunction, the thing that starts the clause, and the subject of the clause. So, for example: "which" can be the subject, "who" can be the subject, "whom" is always an object, never a subject, and "what" can be the subject. "Who", "whoever", "whatever", "whichever" can also be subjects. So I'm going to put an "s" for these. Okay? So it's very important to remember these because sometimes you have to recognize that it is both the conjunction and the clause, and recognize it as a noun clause. Now, of course, it will be much easier to understand all this when we see actual examples, so let's do that. Okay, so now we're going to look at when to use the noun clause and how to use the noun clause. So, noun clauses have basically four uses. Okay? Or actually five, but one of them is similar. First of all we're going to look at it as the subject. So, a noun clause can be the subject of a clause, of an independent clause. So let's look at this example: "What she wore to the party really turned some heads." So, what is the noun clause? "What she wore to the party". Okay? So here's our conjunction, here's our subject, and here's our verb. Okay? And then here's another verb. Now, remember: In every sentence, you're going to have one tense verb, will have one subject that corresponds to it. Here I have two tense verbs, which means I need two subjects. So the subject for "wore" is "she", the subject for "turned" is the entire clause. This is the noun clause subject to this verb. Okay? Turned what? Some heads. And, here, we have the object of the whole sentence. So this sentence is essentially SVO, so we have an independent clause, but the subject of the independent clause is a noun clause. So although you have one independent clause, this is still a complex sentence because we're using an independent and the subordinate, and the dependent clause to build it.
Tree Diagramming Practice
 
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Everybody's favorite activity!!! Watch this podcast to see and learn about tree sentence tree diagramming.
Views: 19067 F Tuzi
National 5 English - Analysis Questions - Sentence Structure
 
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National 5 English analysis questions that focus on sentence structure require you to know the different techniques that are used in sentence structure: repetition, word order, lists, climax, anti-climax and more. All available on the website - www.myetutor.tv
Views: 2239 myetutor
Grammar - Sentence Tree Diagramming-01
 
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Sentence tree diagramming practice -01
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Functional Analysis - Lecture 3 - UCCS MathOnline
 
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Applied Functional Analysis taught by Dr. Greg Morrow from UCCS.
Views: 4384 UCCSMathOnline
FAST Analysis Presentation
 
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This presentation was developed and filmed by the BCN Team for our Midterm Project. It is intended for our New Product Development professors, Stephan and Gursel. Thank you for taking the time to watch it and enjoy!
Views: 1086 Ian Johnson
Tree Diagramming Practice 1
 
22:13
A first in a series of tree diagramming practices.
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Grammar of Sentences: Clauses & Sentences (Lesson 1 of 4)
 
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Learn basics of syntax, the grammar of sentences. In this first video, explore the difference between the form of words (morphology) and the arrangement of words (syntax). Start digging into sentence structure with examples of clauses containing a finite verb, then understand the difference between independent/matrix clauses and dependent/subordinate clauses. View all videos in this series: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD44AB23FFAF3647B Visit the course page for even more information, examples & exercises: http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/grammar-syntax-lessons.php
Views: 24909 NativLang
Analysis of Semantic Function in Teaching Grammar - Two Case Studies
 
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1.Semantic Function •1.0 Meaning of Vocabulary : Meaning of content words实词 and meaning of functional words虚词 •1.1 Meaning of words interaction: between a content word and a content word; a functional word and a content word. •1.2 In addition to the Content words--Noun/pronoun, Verb and adjective etc , the functional words play an important role in Chinese grammar . They are Preposition, Particles, Adverbs, Conjunctive, Interjection and Onomatopoeia etc. •1.3 A Chinese teacher must pay his attention to and let students know the importance of word collocation in addition to the regular relation of words in a sentence. •1.4 A functional word can produces a grammatical pattern in Chinese . 2.0 •Chinese grammar is dealing with an isolated language which is very weak with morphology and realized by adding words or elements 成分 and arranging of word order 词序. •2.1 •A sentence often contains two kinds of elements A and B. Element A is conveying the basic message that are playing by Nouns, verbs and Adjectives. Element B is conveying the secondary level of messages that are most of time playing by Adverbs and other functional words. •2.2 The above mentioned natural fact in Chinese makes Chinese grammar must takes serious of study on functional words and word order. 4.0 •The "dominant" meaning显性语义 and the "recessive meaning"隐性语义. •4.1 •The "dominant" meaning is the meaning of vocabulary which is clear and easy to get from the word itself. Usually you can find a corresponding meaning from a foreign word. • 4.2 The "recessive meaning is a deeper semantic function. It usually does not come from the
Views: 1152 xiongyingzhanchi
Three types of sentence | Syntax | Khan Academy
 
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Three essential types of sentence are declarative sentences (which are statements), interrogative sentences (which are questions), and imperative sentences (which are orders). Join us as we give examples of each! Practice this yourself on Khan Academy right now: https://www.khanacademy.org/syntax/e/declarative--interrogative--and-imperative-sentences Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/grammar/syntax/v/exclamations-syntax-khan-academy Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/grammar/syntax/v/what-is-a-sentence-syntax-khan-academy Syntax on Khan Academy: Syntax is the ordering of language; it’s the study of how sentences work. In this section, we’ll scratch the surface of syntax as it applies to English grammar. Much more can be said about this subject, but we’ll save that for KA Linguistics. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to KhanAcademy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 110305 Khan Academy
Sentence Analysis
 
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Views: 39 ThatGaymerGirl

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