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Coal mining in America's heartland | DW Documentary
 
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West Virginia, USA - under its wild mountain idyll hides the "black hell": A labyrinth of dark tunnels - hard life in a coal mine. [Online until: 15 August 2019] "Wild, wonderful West Virginia” - that’s how the small state nestled in the Appalachian Mountains bills itself. This documentary reports on the daily struggle facing local coal miners hoping for help from Donald Trump; a sheriff combating the opioid epidemic that has already claimed thousands of lives; and a Cherokee environmental activist whose efforts have earned her intimidation and threats. The whistle of a locomotive at the front of an old coal train, quiet winding roads, and hardly a highway to be found - that’s still the image that many have of West Virginia today. But beneath the forest-covered mountains lies a labyrinth of tunnels just one meter high, in which miners still spend their entire working days toiling in the dark on their hands and knees. The camera team accompanies a traditional coal mining family as they go about their day. Together with the family’s two sons, Scott and Steven Lockhart, the crew ventures into the mine. Conversations with the miners reveal why people who had been lifelong Democratic Party supporters are suddenly placing their hopes for the future in Donald Trump. But the documentary also ventures beyond the coal mines to uncover the lesser-known sides of this Appalachian state - from snake-handling Pentecostal churches to the bluegrass and mountain ballads of Alan Cathead Johnston. We also speak with Sheriff Martin West, who sued the country’s three biggest pharmaceutical makers for their role in the opioid epidemic that has swept the region. And we meet another person who has decided to fight back: Maria Gunnoe, a young Cherokee activist who has dared to take on the coal barons that are ravaging the beautiful mountains of West Virginia. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 199167 DW Documentary
Struggling US coal industry sees Trump as saviour
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now : http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN In the United States, coal workers are fervently hoping that presidential candidate Donald Trump will save their vanishing industry. His rival Hillary Clinton believes in shifting to clean, renewable energy, which does not go down well in coal country. Our correspondent reports from southern Illinois, where Trump is popular with voters. A programme prepared by Patrick Lovett and Elom Marcel Toble.   Visit our website : http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel : http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 9136 FRANCE 24 English
World's biggest mine: Inside US coal
 
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Barack Obama’s pledge to cut carbon emissions has not stopped North Antelope Rochelle mine in Wyoming. In fact, production is booming - and climate change is off the agenda. The Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg gets a rare look inside the biggest coal mine in the world. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://bit.ly/subscribegdn Get the whole picture ► http://bit.ly/guardianhome ENDBOARD VIDEOS The godless church and the atheists taking the US by storm ► http://bit.ly/GodlessChurch US Democracy doesn't work in this slice of Florida ► http://bit.ly/1EuRyMz GUARDIAN PLAYLISTS Guardian Investigations ► http://bit.ly/gdninvestigations Comment is Free ► http://bit.ly/CIFplaylist Guardian Docs ► http://bit.ly/gdndocs Guardian Animations & Explanations ► http://bit.ly/aninandex Other Guardian channels on YouTube: Guardian Football ► https://www.youtube.com/user/guardianfootball Guardian Music ► https://www.youtube.com/guardianmusic Guardian Membership ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianMembership Guardian Food ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianFood Guardian Culture ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianCultureArts Guardian Tech ► THE GUARDIAN'S TOP 10 VIDEOS Mos Def force fed in Gitmo procedure ► http://bit.ly/1hdvoqM Bangladeshi Sex Workers take steroids ► http://bit.ly/1mqf3fA North Korean military parade in slow-mo ► http://bit.ly/TTEAGk Police assault on Ian Tomlinson at G20 ► http://bit.ly/1rgq6Pg Manny Pacquiao fight highlights ► http://bit.ly/RBczBp Brick-by-brick women's fencing protest ► http://bit.ly/RBcEFc Trouserless on the Tube ► http://bit.ly/SPWOrv Jesus "would have been an atheist" ► http://bit.ly/1kfrKqP Open Heart Surgery ► http://bit.ly/1tPaGQ2 Brick-by-Brick Usain Bolt 2012 Olympic gold ► http://bit.ly/1pxQqQv
Views: 191348 The Guardian
Does new mine signal comeback for coal industry?
 
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A week after President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, a new coal mine opened about 60 miles outside Pittsburgh. Don Dahler reports from the new mine in Acosta, Pennsylvania. Subscribe to the "CBS This Morning" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q0v2hE Watch "CBS This Morning" HERE: http://bit.ly/1T88yAR Watch the latest installment of "Note to Self," only on "CBS This Morning," HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Sh8XlB Follow "CBS This Morning" on Instagram HERE: http://bit.ly/1Q7NGnY Like "CBS This Morning" on Facebook HERE: http://on.fb.me/1LhtdvI Follow "CBS This Morning" on Twitter HERE: http://bit.ly/1Xj5W3p Follow "CBS This Morning" on Google+ HERE: http://bit.ly/1SIM4I8 Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B --- Delivered by Charlie Rose, Norah O’Donnell and Gayle King, "CBS This Morning" offers a thoughtful, substantive and insightful source of news and information to a daily audience of 3 million viewers. The Emmy Award-winning broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment. Check local listings for "CBS This Morning" broadcast times.
Views: 11282 CBS This Morning
Trump era’s first new coal mine opens in Pennsylvania
 
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US President Donald Trump says he’s opened a “new chapter” for American coal mining. The mine opens one week after President Trump announced his decision to withdraw the US from the Paris Climate agreement, leading to criticism from world leaders and environmental activists. CGTN’s Harry Horton reports.
Views: 2384 CGTN America
11 Most Massive Mines in the World
 
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From the worlds largest gold mine found on the top of a mountain to the largest diamond mine in the world here are the most massive mines in the world! Subscribe to American EYE! 5.. Asbestos Mine, Canada Also known as the Jeffrey Mine, it’s located in Asbestos, Quebec and it was in operation until 2012. It’s a whopping 2 kilometers wide and 370 meters deep! Check out this thing on google maps and you can tell how completely massive this thing is! It’s the by far the largest asbestos mine in the world. For a long period of time, people would use this mineral to put into their walls and keep their homes from catching on fire! But recently there’s been a link with asbestos and a disease called mesothelioma, which is a lung condition. This is a toxic substance that people should avoid, so obviously this large mine went out of business. The lake at the bottom might look like an inviting blue, but you can bet your bottom dollar, it’s highly toxic! The small town that grew with the thriving asbestos industry feels like they’ve kind of lost their identity once the mine was forced to close, but people do still live there. 4. Mcarthur River Uranium Mine In case you were wondering which mine produces the most uranium in the world, that would be of course the Mcarthur River uranium mine in Saskatchewan Canada. This huge deposit was found in 1988 and finally a mining operation took place in 1997, when it began producing what’s known as Yellowcake. It’s not the kind of yellow cake you’d eat with your grandparents. This stuff has a horrific odor and basically what it is, is concentrated uranium powder which can then be used for powering nuclear reactors. We imagine this powdery substance is quite difficult to get ahold of. There aren’t a ton of photos of this place but, it does produce about 13 percent of the global uranium production across the globe. 3. Diavik Diamond Mine In case you thought it was Africa who had all the massive diamond mines, think again! The Diavik Diamond mine, found in the the northwest territories of Canada is one of the largest producers of diamonds in the Northern hemisphere and this place is pretty crazy! They annually produce 7 million carats of diamonds each year and you better believe it’s not easy to get here. The Diavik mine is found north of the arctic circle and it’s definitely cold! This photo here shows the subarctic landscapes that surround the diamond mine. You thought getting to work in the morning was tough for you? Imagine trying to get to work here! Just recently in 2015, this diamond produced what was known as the Diavik Foxfire 187.7 which is one of the largest rough gem quality diamonds ever produced. 2. Siberian Diamond Mine Also known as the Mirny Mine, The USSR began searching for ways to make to make themselves a more economical stable and independent union. In 1955 the Soviets discovered large diamond deposits at this site in the far away lands of Siberia and many people got to work very quickly in order to help bring wealth to the union. After about 20 years of operations, they finally decided that At one point this mine produced 10 million carats of diamonds a year and reaches a max depth of 524 meters or around 1700 feet making it the 2nd largest excavated hole in the world. The mine is so deep, airspace is closed over the hole due to helicopter crashes caused from the downward flow of air. The construction of this in the frigid conditions of Siberia must have been grueling and downright cruel. Sources state that the machinery used at this mine had to be covered at night or it would freeze Are the diamonds worth freezing to death?! It’s unoperational today but Some claim that there’s still a bunch of diamonds in this mine and the whole thing could be worth about 12 Billion dollars. It’s possible that controlling this diamond is mine is crucial to controlling the price of diamonds across the world. Bingham Copper Mine The bingham copper mine located near Salt Lake City Utah is home to the biggest pit in the world and it’s been in operation since 1903. It’s about 2.5 miles wide and if it were a stadium, it would be able to fit an estimated 9.5 million people. It keeps getting bigger and bigger too! Diligent workers can move about 250,000 tons of rock each day and it’s even become a tourist attraction in recent years before a massive landslide took place. Some claim that this was the biggest non volcanic landslide to take place in North American modern history. This photo we see here shows you the aftermath of this massive landslide and Bingham Copper mine and it makes you wonder how safe some of the conditions at these mines truly are. The landslides were so massive, that they actually triggered a few small earthquakes! Experts estimated that 165 tons of earth slide down from the top of the mine all the way to the bottom.
Views: 38624 American Eye
AMERICA REVEALED | Where Does Our Coal Come From? | PBS
 
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See the full episode at http://video.pbs.org/video/2226356267/ Did you know coal supplies nearly half of America's electricity? Visit Black Thunder Mine with Yul Kwon and discover how we mine this pivotal material. See more in the four-part AMERICA REVEALED, Wednesdays, April 11- May 2 at 10/9c on PBS.
Views: 79628 PBS
Coal Miner to Trump: “Coal Mining Isn’t Coming Back” | NYT - Opinion
 
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A fifth-generation coal miner from Appalachia tells Trump his plan to loosen regulations on coal-fired plants not only is harmful to the environment, but also bad for the future of the region. Read more: https://nyti.ms/2LjD3n5 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n More from The New York Times Video: http://nytimes.com/video ---------- Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.
Views: 21535 The New York Times
Coal mine celebrated by Trump opens in Pennsylvania
 
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Leland Vittert shares an inside look
Views: 32128 Fox News
US Mines & Mineral Resources: "United States: A Ten Talent Nation" 1922 American Motion Picture
 
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Geology & Earth Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://scitech.quickfound.net Good overview of mining and mineral resources in the US as of 1922, with many nice film clips and lots of statistics. Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal and oil shale, gemstones, limestone, and dimension stone, rock salt and potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stone and metal has been done since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. The nature of mining processes creates a potential negative impact on the environment both during the mining operations and for years after the mine is closed. This impact has led to most of the world's nations adopting regulations to moderate the negative effects of mining operations. Safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have improved safety in mines significantly... Mining in the United States became prevalent in the 19th century, and the General Mining Act of 1872 was passed to encourage mining of federal lands. As with the California Gold Rush in the mid 19th century, mining for minerals and precious metals, along with ranching, was a driving factor in the Westward Expansion to the Pacific coast. With the exploration of the West, mining camps were established and "expressed a distinctive spirit, an enduring legacy to the new nation;" Gold Rushers would experience the same problems as the Land Rushers of the transient West that preceded them. Aided by railroads, many traveled West for work opportunities in mining. Western cities such as Denver and Sacramento originated as mining towns. As new areas were explored, it was usually the gold (placer and then load) and then silver that were taken first, with other metals often waiting for railroads or canals. Coarse gold dust and nuggets do not require smelting, is easy to identify and is easily transported. Modern period In the early 20th century, the gold and silver rush to the western United States also stimulated mining for base metals such as copper, lead, and iron as well as coal. Areas in modern Montana, Utah, Arizona, and later Alaska became predominate suppliers of copper to the world, which was increasingly demanding copper for electrical and households goods. Canada's mining industry grew more slowly than the United States due to limitations in transportation, capital, and U.S. competition; Ontario was the major producer of the early 20th century with nickel, copper, and gold. Meanwhile, Australia experienced the Australian gold rushes and by the 1850s was producing 40% of the world's gold, followed by the establishment of large mines such as the Mount Morgan Mine, which ran for nearly a hundred years, Broken Hill ore deposit (one of the largest zinc-lead ore deposits), and iron ore mines at Iron Knob. After declines in production, another boom in mining occurred in the 1960s and in the 21st century Australia remains a major world mineral producer. Into the 21st century, a globalized mining industry of large multinational corporations has arisen. Peak minerals and environmental impacts have also become a concern. Different elements, particularly rare earth minerals, have begun to increase in demand as a result of new technologies...
Views: 1609 Jeff Quitney
Digging for Hope: Inside an Ohio coal mine
 
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Matt Beaver and other miners describe their difficult working conditions and how they hope President Donald Trump can save their struggling industry. They work at the Vail Mine, owned by the Redbud Mining Company, in Freeport, Ohio.
Views: 486052 TheColumbusDispatch
Coal Mines
 
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The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, jacks and shearers. - H&T
Views: 12754 History of Technology
How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries
 
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How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries. Welcome to DOCUMENTARIES - home of the best documentary movies and documentary films. Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States, "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Read More About "How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining Subscribe to Documentaries to be the first to receive updates - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQtbnPVhfIsKCzbVOHk_WEg Join us in our documentaries community discussion by following us in our documentaries Google+ community discussion - https://aboutme.google.com/u/0/b/116952488485458973611 Thanks for watching DOCUMENTARIES - home of the best documentary movies and documentary films. #Documentaries #YouTubeMovies #DocumentaryMovies #Education #Entertainment Thanks for watching "How Coal Is Mined and Refined - Top Coal Mining Spots in the World - Documentaries"
Views: 1380 Documentaries
American Coal Mining Documentary - Strip Mines - Appalachian Mountains - 1974
 
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FOR OVER 25 YEARS COAL COMPANIES HAVE STRIP MINED THOUSAND OF ACRES OF AMERICAN APPALCHIAN MOUNTAINS. THOUSAND OF ACRES OF COUNTRY ARE LAID WASTE AS WHOLE MOUNTAINSIDE ARE BLASTED AND BULLDOZED TO REACH OFTEN TINY COAL SEAMS. ONE OF THE BIGGEST LAND OWNERS IN THE AREA IS THE BRITISH COMPANY "AMERICAN ASSOCIATION LTD" WHICH FORMS PART OF AN INTERNATIONAL EMPIRE HEADED BY AN EX LORD MAYOR OF LONDON, SIR DENYS LOWSON. First Shown: 25/07/1974 If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: [email protected] Quote: VT9724
Views: 13993 ThamesTv
Coal Mine GoPro
 
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Going underground to see how spray foam helps the mining industry.
Views: 4092 TheChinZtube
The Collapse of Coal
 
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American coal is in crisis. Production is down. Mining companies have declared bankruptcy. So how did America's coal industry get in this situation? And what will happen to America's coal communities? Inside Energy and The Allegheny Front teamed up to look at the collapse of coal.
Views: 37331 Inside Energy
BROKEN PROMISE: Coal Jobs Still Disappearing
 
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Trump repeatedly said he was bringing coal mingling jobs back. Oops. Cenk Uygur, the host of The Young Turks, tells you how he broke his promise. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. Read more here: https://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/trump-backing-pennsylvania-county-braces-for-layoffs-as-coal-mine-closure-threatens-hundreds-of-jobs/ “President Donald Trump may have ended the so-called “war on coal,” but that doesn’t seem to have changed the fortunes of the coal-mining industry as a whole. Local news station WTVA reports that 370 coal miners are expected to be unemployed after a coal mine located in Greene County, Pennsylvania closes for good this year. The mine closing would all but wipe out any gains made in coal mining employment since Trump’s election, as the coal industry has so far added just 500 jobs over the last year. Blair Zimmerman, a retired coal miner who now serves as Greene County’s chairman of county commissioners, tells WTVA that the mine closing will be a major blow for the entire area. “Layoffs are bad, but when it comes to shutting down a mine, that’s as bad as it gets,” he said. Zimmerman said that, despite the election of Trump, the low price of natural gas has continued to hammer the coal industry, just as it did during the Obama administration. In all, Zimmerman said that it’s very hard to see coal coming back as Trump has repeatedly promised.” Hosts: Cenk Uygur Cast: Cenk Uygur *** The Largest Online News Show in the World. Hosted by Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian. LIVE STREAMING weekdays 6-8pm ET. https://goo.gl/tJpj1m Subscribe to The Young Turks on YouTube: https://goo.gl/a3JY9i Like The Young Turks on Facebook: https://goo.gl/txrhrh Follow The Young Turks on Twitter: https://goo.gl/w6ahdV Buy TYT Merch: https://goo.gl/KVysaM Download audio and video of the full two hour show on-demand + the members-only post game show by becoming a member at https://goo.gl/v8E64M. Your membership supports the day to day operations and is vital for our continued success and growth. Young Turk (n), 1. Young progressive or insurgent member of an institution, movement, or political party. 2. A young person who rebels against authority or societal expectations.(American Heritage Dictionary)
Views: 90127 The Young Turks
Kellingley Colliery: Britain's last coal mine closes
 
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A million men used to toil beneath the ground. Coal-mining fuelled the industrial revolution and brought about the biggest industrial dispute of the last fifty years. Now Britain's last deep coal mine, Kellingley Colliery in Yorkshire, has closed. Subscribe for more like this, every day: http://bit.ly/1epe41j Dangerous world: http://bit.ly/1JCsSYb The news explained: http://bit.ly/1epgay4 Music: http://bit.ly/1RVTRNy Technology: http://bit.ly/1LI1K9y Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1wQ1Gty Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1mFUjBD
Views: 25593 Channel 4 News
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
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In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 64934 National Geographic
COAL: The documentary
 
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The Northwest is square in the middle of a controversial global debate: Should the region build export terminals that would open lucrative markets for the world's dirtiest fossil fuel? As the U.S. economy continues to struggle, can the country afford not to? COAL is a KCTS 9 and EarthFix original documentary. For more information on the documentary, visit: kcts9.org/coal or earthfix.us/coaldoc. For ongoing reporting on Coal in the Northwest, visit EarthFix: earthfix.info/coal/ Credits Written, Directed and Produced by Katie Campbell Photography by Michael Werner Katie Campbell Editor Michael Werner Narrator Katie Campbell EarthFix reporters Ashley Ahearn Bonnie Stewart Amelia Templeton Courtney Flatt Cassandra Profita Aaron Kunz Aerial photography by Katie Campbell Aerial support provided by Christopher Boyer, LightHawk Hunter Handsfield, LightHawk Additional photography Aaron Kunz Stock Footage - RevoStock Audio post production Milt Ritter Post Production Support Lisa Strube-Kilgore Phil Williams Chris Maske Music Lonely Rails Written by Seth Warren and C. Andrew Rohrmann. Performed by Seth Warren. Published by Sciencelab. Salt Flats Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Like a Phoenix Written by Steve Carter. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Celtic Mist Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Pistola Written by Geoff Levin. Published by ZFC Music. Fluttering Leaves Written by Daniel Pemberton. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Couple Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by BBC Production Music. Halcyon Skies Written by Ben Hales and Matt Hales. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Loner Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Special Thanks to Dustin Bleizeffer Shannon Anderson LightHawk Keith Williams Thunder Basin Coal Company Leroy Rohde Andy Rohrmann Tom Lubnau Columbia River Pilots Aaron Toso Courtney Wallace Lauri Hennessey
Views: 149226 EarthFixMedia
Young coal mine workers l Hidden America: Children of the Mountains PART 5/6
 
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Diane Sawyer follows 18-year-old Jeremey as he starts working in a coal mine to support his family. [Original Air Date 2/13/2009] WATCH FULL EPISODES OF 20/20: http://abc.go.com/shows/2020 SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: https://www.youtube.com/ABCNews/ Watch More on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE: https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/
Views: 101107 ABC News
The future of coal miners in Trump's America
 
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"The Messy Truth" host Van Jones discusses the future of coal mine workers in President Donald Trump's America with writer Stephen Moore.
Views: 41325 CNN
The Secret Dilemma Facing America's Coal Miners | NBC Left Field
 
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Donald Trump says he’s going to put America’s miners back to work. But with many of them claiming they’re still being forced to choose between safe work conditions, and keeping their jobs, should we really be talking about the deadly risks? SUBSCRIBE: http://nbcnews.to/2rAQzwx FOLLOW NBC LEFT FIELD: Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/2rACLSM Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/2rAsQwp Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/2rAsWUN CALL THE FIELD PHONE: ☎️ (315) LF-FIELD VISIT OUR SITE: http://nbcleftfield.com Video: Justine Bo Executive Producer: David Botti Producer: Freddie Campion __ ABOUT NBC LEFT FIELD: NBC Left Field is a new internationally-minded video troupe that makes short, creative documentaries and features specially designed for social media and set-top boxes. Our small team of cinematographers, journalists, animators and social media gurus aims to unearth stories and breathe creative life into current headlines. While pushing boundaries at home and abroad, NBC Left Field will also be serving as an experimental hub for NBC News style, treatment and audience engagement. The Secret Dilemma Facing America's Coal Miners | NBC Left Field
Views: 2687 NBC News
The changing face of America's coal country
 
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President Donald Trump has been adamant in his desire to revive American coal mining, but the industry is playing a smaller part in the country's energy output and the potential workforce isn't waiting around. Click here for the full story: http://cbc.ca/1.4097615 »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNational?sub_confirmation=1 Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online: The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational The National Updates on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CBCTheNational »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» The National is CBC Television's flagship news program. Airing seven days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada's leading journalists.
Coal miners in West Virginia find hope in Trump
 
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McDowell County in West Virginia where the coal mining industry has been in steep decline for decades, has put their hope behind Presidential candidate Donald Trump who has promised to re-open the coal mines.
Views: 7831 National Post
US coal industry staging comeback under Trump
 
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US coal industry staging comeback under Trump Higher prices and support from the new US administration are helping the US coal industry, even as overall demand for the fossil fuel continues to shrink. During his election campaign, President Donald Trump promised to bring back coal jobs and remove environmental regulations. But there are increasing worries that coal use will further add to the country's pollution crisis. Al Jazeera's Kristen Saloomey reports from Somerset, Pennsylvania. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 5637 Al Jazeera English
US coal miners hope Trump presidency can save the industry
 
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A large number of white working-class voters came out in support of US President-elect Donald Trump in the elections. Al Jazeera spoke to one such voter, a coal miner in the state of Illinois where many feel they personally made Trump's victory possible. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 5239 Al Jazeera English
Hearts of Coal: Dirty, Demanding & Dangerous (RT Documentary)
 
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It's dirty, demanding and highly dangerous, but in Russia, coal mining is a multi-billion dollar business. Join James Brown as he travels to the Kuzbass, Russia's coal basin, to see what it takes to work in an industry that employs more than 100,000 people, but which still claims lives every year. Meet the men who do one of the toughest rescue jobs in the world, the miners who spend their lives in some of the largest pits on the planet and the families that love them. Watch more on RT's documentary channel http://rtd.rt.com RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 500 million YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 14747 RT
Coal Mining Disease Re-emerges
 
04:14
Mollye Borrows talks about the alarming re-emergence of black lung disease. FOLLOW Mike Papantonio on Twitter: https://twitter.com/americaslawyer FOLLOW America’s Lawyer on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/rtamericaslawyer Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 4219 RT America
US coal production up as Trump vows to end 'war' on industry
 
01:25
Jeff Flock reports on the recent profit surges.
Views: 3450 Fox News
MINING SAFETY FILM  COAL MINE SHUTTLE CAR OPERATOR  45734
 
19:12
“The Shuttle Car Operator” is 1960s-era color film taking the viewer deep inside a bituminous coal mine to learn more about the coal-mining industry. The camera takes us into cramped spaces as drills make their way through the earth (mark 01:15) and coal hauled away on trolleys called shuttle cars. But the job of a shuttle car operator is one of the most dangerous in the coal mining industry, we’re told at mark 02:10, with one out of every seven transportation injuries involving shuttle car operators. To ensure safety the film discusses the importance of proper car maintenance and proper training of employees. Numerous scenes of shuttle cars in the bowels of the earth follow as the narrator continuously reminds the viewer of the importance of being vigilent and on the lookout for any physical hazards that may impede movement. Starting at mark 04:45 the film reminds of the viewer of those men who “paid with their lives” as crews are shown at work including checking ventilation shafts and removing hazards — though “failure to think about safety” leads to a (staged) fatality at mark 07:55. Other accidents follow, the result of workers too engaged in conversation and oblivious to changes in their underground environment, or those inadequately trained. If an operator is trained and alert, we’re told at mark 15:50, such tragedy can be averted. First introduced in the 1930s, shuttle cars are batch haulage vehicles in the underground mining industry. Shuttle cars are designed to work as a system with continuous miners, efficiently removing cut material from the working face and maximizing the productivity of the entire section. Heavy-duty, high-power drive trains enable our shuttle cars to haul heavy loads in the most difficult conditions. Traction motors power the permanent four-wheel drive system. The cast pivot axles are virtually indestructible, while the heavy-duty conveyors and abrasion-resistant conveyor decking improve reliability and durability. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 6526 PeriscopeFilm
Sago Mine Disaster
 
43:34
Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 144428 Nick Mullins
WV and U.S. Coal Production Way Up
 
02:16
U.S. coal production increased 100 percent in 2017; WV coal exports up by 42 percent.
Views: 89 WOWK 13 News
Anthracite Coal Mining circa 1920
 
15:59
more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent. Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 13638 Jeff Quitney
A Hidden America: Coal Mining
 
04:52
Section of 20/20 Documentary. I do not own the rights to this video.
Views: 37746 Damien Dickman
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
13:41
There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 187424 VICE News
COAL MINE SHUTTLE CAR OPERATOR MINING  45734
 
09:06
“The Shuttle Car Operator” is 1960s-era color film taking the viewer deep inside a bituminous coal mine to learn more about the coal-mining industry. The camera takes us into cramped spaces as drills make their way through the earth (mark 01:15) and coal hauled away on trolleys called shuttle cars. But the job of a shuttle car operator is one of the most dangerous in the coal mining industry, we’re told at mark 02:10, with one out of every seven transportation injuries involving shuttle car operators. To ensure safety the film discusses the importance of proper car maintenance and proper training of employees. Numerous scenes of shuttle cars in the bowels of the earth follow as the narrator continuously reminds the viewer of the importance of being vigilent and on the lookout for any physical hazards that may impede movement. Starting at mark 04:45 the film reminds of the viewer of those men who “paid with their lives” as crews are shown at work including checking ventilation shafts and removing hazards — though “failure to think about safety” leads to a (staged) fatality at mark 07:55. Other accidents follow, the result of workers too engaged in conversation and oblivious to changes in their underground environment, or those inadequately trained. If an operator is trained and alert, we’re told at mark 15:50, such tragedy can be averted. First introduced in the 1930s, shuttle cars are batch haulage vehicles in the underground mining industry. Shuttle cars are designed to work as a system with continuous miners, efficiently removing cut material from the working face and maximizing the productivity of the entire section. Heavy-duty, high-power drive trains enable our shuttle cars to haul heavy loads in the most difficult conditions. Traction motors power the permanent four-wheel drive system. The cast pivot axles are virtually indestructible, while the heavy-duty conveyors and abrasion-resistant conveyor decking improve reliability and durability. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 712 PeriscopeFilm
Coal Mining (1950)
 
02:35
Location unspecified. Coal miners wearing helmets with lights on underground, one sets off an explosion. Miner winds up wire and walks along tunnel. He picks up pick axe, to chip at the side of the coal. CU Three miners crouching close together talking. The men start to pull away the coal using their pickaxes. The coal is thrown in chunks on to a moving conveyor belt. A new beam is put into position to secure the ceiling. Coal is shovelled on to a moving conveyor belt. Mute Col Neg FILM ID:3337.01 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 11239 British Pathé
Global warming fears throw Utah coal industry into crisis
 
02:44
As the need to fight global warming by reducing carbon emissions intensifies, some communities are faced with stark economic choices. In the US state of Utah, a community that has built its economy around coal has been trying to sell its product abroad. Al Jazeera’s Rob Reynolds reports from Price, Utah. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 5061 Al Jazeera English
Who Killed The Coal Industry in America? 2017 Edition
 
04:17
The coal industry in the US is almost dead, but it wasn’t renewables that killed it. Get new updates straight to your inbox here https://teslanomics.co/join "The biggest contributor to coal and nuclear plant retirements has been the advantaged economics of natural gas-fired generation,” says a recent report by the Department of Energy. It also found that the rise of renewable energy, such as wind and solar, hasn’t yet created any problems for reliability and resilience of the electricity grid. The report also recommends that the department shouldn’t intervene in energy markets, such as using funds to support coal. Between 2012 and 2017, the US shut approximately 50 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired generation capacity. If planned retirements are taken into consideration, the future for coal looks even bleaker. When President Obama was in office he created the Clean Power Plan which was aimed at lowering the CO2 emissions from the US by capturing some of the carbon emitted and increasing the mix of renewable forms of energy like Wind and Solar. In March of 2017, the Trump administration repealed this hoping it would, as he said “save the coal industry” however the report from the DOE suggests otherwise.  Their report predicts into the future we’ll see more and more natural gas and less coal and nuclear. One of the main reasons is because of how much more efficient Natural Gas is compared to Coal and Nuclear. While Coal and Nuclear are similar regarding the heat generated during the process of creating electricity, the heat generated using Natural Gas has continued to decline, giving it a greater overall efficiency. The nail in the coffin for the solar industry could be renewables which combined with Natural Gas, will deliver the final blow the coal industry, laying it to rest once and for all. #hallelujah A big reason for this is because of the cost of renewables. Some forecasts suggest that the levelized average cost of electricity (LCOE) per kWh will drop significantly by 2025 making Solar from PhotoVoltaic panels and onshore wind the cheapest in the world. And we’re already seeing a huge spike in Solar investments here in the US in recent years, now accepting for almost 10% of the overall grid. So I want to say thank you to Rick Perry, for ordering this study and helping us move closer towards a brighter future where not only is our energy better for the environment, but cheaper and more sustainable as well. In fact, he will probably come around once he realizes how many more jobs the renewable energy industry is creating. His own department put out a report in showing that the Solar industry alone employed more than double the number of coal employees across the US. Like any high-level figures though, this metric didn't tell the true story as there was a job disparity across the states. Coal was by far the bigger employer in some areas still. But the point here is that there is indeed a big market for energy workers in the US and just because the Coal industry is vanishing, it doesn’t mean the jobs will vanish as well, they’ll likely just change slightly.  // Sources https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/04/25/climate/todays-energy-jobs-are-in-solar-not-coal.html https://qz.com/1061246/a-new-department-of-energy-report-explains-why-coal-is-dying-in-the-us/ // New here? Check out more Most Recent Video - https://goo.gl/k3pWlt Most Popular Video - https://goo.gl/jydACR Subscribe - https://goo.gl/tPDO7v // Want to Support the Show? Join us on Patreon! https://teslanomics.co/patreon // Shoot me a msg online fb https://fb.com/teslanomics tw https://twitter.com/teslanomicsco // My Gear Books https://kit.com/teslanomicsco/books-i-ve-actually-read Tech https://kit.com/teslanomicsco/tech-gear Camera - https://kit.com/teslanomicsco/camera-gear Aitech by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100336 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ That Day by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/YDT00lBAG2g
Stock Footage - Coal Mining in Early America
 
00:36
Archive Footage - Black & White - The Coal Mining industry of America. For this and more Footage visit: http://www.myfootage.com/details.php?gid=58&sgid=&pid=16206#tn This clip is available for licensing from MyFootage.com - Call us at (212) 620-3955 - Please Subscribe to our channel, as we are constantly adding new clips. Thanks!
Views: 3924 MyFootage.com
The Biggest Coal Mines In India
 
13:53
Biggest Dragline . Shovel .Dumper Opreting In This Mines
Views: 193533 mahesh prasad Tiwari
Coal Mines Of Cape Breton (Part 2)
 
03:37
Coal Mining in Cape Breton Nova Scotia. Music By IIIrd Tyme Out, Coal Mine Blues. Early Mining The southeastern part of Cape Breton Island is home to the Sydney Coal Field, an extensive underground coal seam extending at an angle from the shore beneath the seafloor of the Cabot Strait. This large deposit of high-sulphur coal was first extracted by French soldiers from Fortress Louisbourg in 1720 at nearby Port Morien. A major coal industry developed during the 19th century, becoming the largest energy project in British North America at its height of production. The largest integrated steel mill in the British Commonwealth was constructed on Sydney Harbor in 1901. The coal and steel industries went into decline following World War II and never fully recovered. They were nationalized by the federal and provincial governments during the late 1960s with the intention of closing them by the 1980s, however production increased in the 1970s as a result of rising world oil and steel prices. By the 1990s, environmental degradation (see Sydney Tar Ponds) and economic ruin was facing the industrial Cape Breton region. The steel mill and last coal mine were closed in 2001 and the area has been struggling to adapt. While the urban area of eastern Cape Breton County influenced by the coal and steel industries came to be referred to as "Industrial Cape Breton", many rural communities in the rest of Cape Breton Island have been relatively stable economically, largely due to the mix of fishing, forestry, small-scale agriculture, and a growing tourism industry as a result of the spectacular scenery found throughout the island. In 1914 the SCOTIA steel mill was closed and in 1920 both DOMCO/DISCO and SCOTIA were merged into a new company named British Empire Steel and Coal Company (BESCO). The copyright of this section might be in question and is likely from UMWA material. IN MARCH OF 1925, Cape Breton coal miners were receiving $3.65 in daily wages and had been working part-time for more than three years. They burned company coal to heat company houses illuminated by company electricity. Their families drank company water, were indebted to the company "Pluck Me" store and were financially destitute as evidenced by the company "Bob Tailed Sheet". Local clergy spoke of children clothed in flour sacks and dying of starvation from the infamous "four cent meal". The miners had fought continuously since 1909 for decent working conditions, an eight hour day and a living wage. The British Empire Steel Corporation (BESCO) was controlled by President Roy M. Wolvin and Vice-President J.E. McClurg who defended these conditions by frankly stating, DEVCO and SYSCO On July 7, 1967 the Cape Breton Development Corporation (DEVCO) was created and on March 30, 1968 all DOSCO mines were expropriated for $12 million by DEVCO. At the same time, the provincial government formed the Sydney Steel Corporation (SYSCO) and took over DOSCO's steel mill, with the aim being to gradually control the shut down of this industry. DEVCO brought in new tourism initiatives throughout Cape Breton Island and funded various community economic development programs, however politics and other factors such as the 1973 oil crisis brought about by the OPEC embargo following the Yom Kippur War saw demand for coal increase dramatically, particularly for electrical generation. The federal government reversed course and chose to expand, rather than retract, the production of coal and opened new mines and modernized its DOSCO-inherited properties to serve new electrical generating stations. During the 1980s the provincial government also modernized the steel mill, however both coal and steel encountered production and financial difficulties in the 1990s and DEVCO and SYSCO both decommissioned their operations by the turn of the century or shortly thereafter. The last underground coal mine on Cape Breton Island closed in November 2001. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Views: 32940 Buddy Penney
Fact checking Trump Coal mines open, prospects bleak
 
06:32
Trump Breaking News Network - Fact-checking Trump Coal mines open, prospects bleak As President Trump announced on Thursday that the U.S. would leave the Paris climate agreement, he repeatedly expressed unwavering support for the coal mining industry. Boosting coal production, bringing back coals jobs, and killing federal climate change programs have been among his top priorities since he took office. “The mines are starting to open up, having a big opening in two weeks, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, so many places,” Trump said in his Rose Garden speech. “A big opening of a brand new mine. It’s unheard of.” But across the country, coal mines aren’t starting to open as much as Trump suggests, and the industry faces a bleak future as cheap and abundant natural gas, wind and solar power outcompete coal. “The decline in U.S. coal production is the result of powerful technological and market trends that are unlikely to change anytime soon,” said Jonathan Koomey, an earth systems and energy lecturer at Stanford University. “Cheap natural gas, the rapid decline in the cost of solar and wind generation, and continued flat electricity demand make it next to impossible that U.S. coal production will significantly increase in coming years.” ----------------------------------------------------------- MAKE DONATIONS HERE http://trumpbreakingnewsnetwork.net/donation ----------------------------------------------------------- Source: http://www.salon.com/2017/06/07/fact-checking-trump-coal-mines-open-prospects-bleak_partner-2/ Please subscribe and share on your social media. Please visit our playlist: Obama News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLU6CCWA5t3rn893Vqlm80Q4ud3SMaLLS9 Clinton News https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLU6CCWA5t3rnIXWtR-8OI6M18wHXQGFMQ https://youtu.be/nZC3TzLtuo4 Visit or web: http://trumpbreakingnewsnetwork.net/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Trump-Breaking-News-Network-1866322290266195/ Trump Breaking News Network Espanol: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4rDGhl9ahkirbpCwdhd5AA TRUMPTBNN USDN1
What Coal Mining Hydrogeology tells us about the Real Risks of Fracking_London Lecture_May 2016
 
01:30:21
Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who hypothesise (amongst other things) that potable ground water supplies could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. There are very strong reasons for doubting this hypothesis, not least because migration of fractures to prolific aquifers would be highly unlikely to lead to pollution, but almost certain to result in drowning of the shale gas wells, rendering them unusable. Hence, despite having contrasting motivations, shale gas developers and environmental guardians turn out to have a strong common interest in avoiding inter-connection to aquifers. There is in fact a century-long analogue for such a ‘confluence’ of interests, provided by the history of longwall coal mining beneath the sea and major aquifers. Where large-scale mining proceeded from the surface downwards, major hydraulic inter-connection of shallow and deep zones did indeed result in widespread water pollution. However, where new mines were developed at depth without any connections to shallow old workings), complete hydraulic isolation from the near-surface hydrogeological environment was successfully maintained. This was despite the fact that longwall mining produced far greater stratal disruption than shale gas fracking ever could. A detailed example is presented from the successful operation of the Selby Coalfield beneath one of the UK’s main aquifers. This profound and sustained historical analogue provides a very clear lesson: given the lack of hydrogeological connectivity to shallow aquifers, shale gas fracking per se cannot contaminate shallow ground water. Provided operators observe long-established laws governing hydrocarbon wells and associated surface operations, other hydrogeological risks will also be minimal. Opponents of shale gas developments should therefore focus attention on more realistic potential impacts, most of which are familiar from almost any planning application, such as increased truck traffic on minor roads. Speaker Biography Paul Younger (University of Glasgow) Paul L Younger FREng holds the Rankine Chair of Engineering and is Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He was formerly Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement at Newcastle University, where he also established and led the Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and, subsequently, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability. A geologist by first degree, Paul trained in hydrogeology in the USA as a Harkness Fellow in the mid-1980s, subsequently developing a career in environmental engineering. He is perhaps best known for his research and outreach on the environmental management of water in active and abandoned mines worldwide, which won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for Newcastle University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society and a Chartered Geologist, as well as a Chartered Engineer. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2007 and has received honorary doctorates for his mine water pollution work from leading universities in Spain and South America. His current research focuses on deep geothermal. In parallel with his mainstream academic work, Paul has founded and directed four companies in the water and energy sectors and has authored more than 400 items in the international literature, including the well-received books “Mine Water: Hydrology, pollution, remediation” (Kluwer, 2002), “Groundwater in the Environment: An Introduction” (Blackwell, 2007), “Water: all that matters” (Hodder, 2012) and “Energy: all that matters” (Hodder, 2014). His knowledge of shale gas was gained through serving on the Joint Royal Academies’ Expert Panel, which reported to the UK government in 2012, and on the Independent Expert Panel on Unconventional Gas, which reported to the Scottish Government in June 2014. When not otherwise engaged, Paul’s preferred activities include exploring the Scottish Highlands and Islands, singing and playing traditional music, and indulging his love of the Spanish and Gaelic languages and cultures. Website: www.geolsoc.org.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com/geolsoc
Views: 3635 GeologicalSociety
What Happened to Coal?
 
05:31
Coal has been declining in the U.S., and now big companies are declaring bankruptcy. So what lead to coal's decline in the U.S.? Inside Energy's Leigh Paterson reports.
Views: 3624 Inside Energy
History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
09:02
In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 27484 markdcatlin
INDUSTRY ON PARADE   PACKAGING OF PRODUCTS   COAL MINING  TRANSISTORS  MAINE FISHING FLEET 64844
 
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Industry On Parade was a television series created by the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) from 1950-1960. The series consisted of weekly episodes that highlighted American manufacturing and business. Hundreds of companies and products were documented during the [program’s] decade-long run. The first episode of this set of three episodes is titled “Contents: Merchandise.” It looks at the packaging of various consumer products. Matches are produced at a production plant (00:44) and move along a conveyer belt. Cigars are machine-wrapped on an assembly line (01:22). At Millprint Inc. in Milwaukee, people sketch out packaging artwork (01:57). New packaging tape is tested (02:20). The episode then shows a packaging production plant where cardboard packages are made and put together (02:52). Boxboard is transformed into an array of containers at Old Dominion Box Company in Charlotte, NC (03:20). Strips are fed into a machine (03:47) that cuts and glues them into small boxes. 6-pack containers are manufactured at the Atlanta Paper Company (04:28) using massive printing machines; unassembled cartons are then fed into a machine that folds and glues them. Women at a St. Louis plant oversee the production of netting for bags used for produce (05:25). Propulsion cans are manufactured with large production machines (06:48). The episode then takes viewers to a New Jersey coffee packing plant (07:25). Coffee tins are filled with coffee then sealed (07:59) with pressure packing before undergoing a pressure test (08:24). Cigarettes are manufactured (08:50), packed and shipped at another factory. There are more shots of various production machines with people overseeing the production lines. A woman fills a bag with ready-mixed cake products (09:46). A grocery store conveyer belt shows a variety of grocery products in the latest packaging (10:43). Kids get a wax-coated milk carton from a vending machine (11:19). The second episode discusses “profits and progress” using a suburban family to illustrate the importance of putting profits back into the business to fuel growth. A young boy and girl set up a lemonade stand in a suburban neighborhood (14:05). The episode cuts to their father’s Texaco Filing Station (15:29), where cars arrive for services. The father buys stock in the General Transistor Corporation. The episode shows the General Transistor’s small enterprise building (17:06) at Long Island, NY. A machine pulls crystals of germanium (18:10) as a skilled worker oversees the process. Other new machines are used for research. Women clock out of work at the company (19:53). There are shots of research labs and transistor testing in quality control. Transistors are fed into a machine to mark them for their capability (22:08). The third episode (no. 122) is from 1953. It begins with a look at the surface mining operations of the Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Company in Kansas. A drill is used to remove a layer of earth, then the hillside is blasted. A giant shovel moves coal and earth (27:56). Another machine punches through the earth to break it up. A train car loaded with coal is tipped (29:05) to remove the coal. Conveyer belts move and separate the coal by grade. The segment ends with shots of coal mounds leftover from surface mining (29:50). Next, viewers are shown the Shepherd Envelope Company plant (31:29) where various envelopes are produced. A machine di-cuts paper; a woman feeds paper into a window-cutting machine (31:58). Envelopes move on a chain conveyer and are then boxed. The next segment shows the “tilt-up technique” of building new factories. The Barrett and Hile Company of San Francisco, CA, pours concrete into wall forms on the ground; a crane lifts the wall panel (33:20) up and into position. The final segment of this episode follows a Maine Sardine Fleet fishing boat (35:18) as it fishes for sardines. Men take a smaller boat (35:47) out to circle the sardines with a net. A carrier boat arrives to take the catch (37:00), using smaller nets to transfer the sardines into the carrier boat. The fish are pumped out into a canning plant using a massive vacuum (37:54), where they are hand-packed along an assembly line (38:31). A machine adds and crimps lids to the tops of the sardine cans (39:12). We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 408 PeriscopeFilm
Tensions between China, North Korea helping US coal industry?
 
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FBN's Jeff Flock on China starting to buy coal from the US.
Views: 1846 Fox Business

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